Program

We’re pleased to announce the ICIS 2020 program. Click on the tabs below to review the program by day. Expand/close the text boxes to view the session descriptions.

(Please note, program may be subject to change)

09:00 – 16:00  Pre-Conference Workshops

All Day workshops:

Micro ERP Boot Camp

Time: 09:00 – 16:00 (TBC)

Location: Scottish Event Campus

Led by Steve Luck, Center for Mind and Brain, UC-Davis

The Micro ERP Boot Camp is a 1-day version of the 10-day UC-Davis ERP Boot Camp.  This workshop provides an intensive introduction to the ERP technique, designed for infancy researchers at the graduate, postgraduate, and faculty levels. It will be designed for individuals who have recently started using ERPs, are thinking about starting a line of ERP research, or just want to be able to understand and critically evaluate published ERP research. No prior ERP background is necessary (but it will also be valuable for people with prior ERP experience).

Topics will include:

  • Experimental design and interpretation
  • Filtering and time-frequency analysis
  • Artifact rejection and correction
  • Averaging and baseline correction
  • Quantifying component amplitudes and latencies
  • Statistical analysis of ERP data

Individuals with no prior ERP background are encouraged to prepare for the workshop by reading the first two chapters of An Introduction to the Event-Related Potential Technique, 2nd Edition (MIT Press).

 

Dynamic Field Theory Boot camp: Learn to Model Development in a Day

Time: 09:00 – 16:00 (TBC)

Location: Scottish Event Campus

Organisers: John Spencer, University of East Anglia

Dynamical Field Theory (DFT) offers a framework for thinking about representation-in-the-moment that is grounded in both Dynamical Systems thinking and neurophysiology. Dynamic Fields are formalizations of how neural populations represent the continuous dimensions that characterize perceptual features, movements, and cognitive decisions. Neural fields evolve dynamically under the influence of inputs as well as strong neuronal interaction, generating activation ‘peaks’ that establish links between brain and behavior. By coupling multiple cortical fields together, one can create process theories of how children think. Moreover, by incorporating change over multiple timescales in the form of memory traces, DFT offers a way to integrate both real-time behavior and longer-term changes in cognition over learning and development. One obstacle for researchers wishing to use DFT has been that the mathematical and technical skills required to make these concepts operational are not part of the standard repertoire of developmental scientists. The goal of this tutorial is to provide the training and tools to overcome this obstacle. The goal is to literally teach you how to model development in a day.

We will start with an overview of neural dynamics. We’ll jump right into the maths behind DFT, including the basics of attractors, stability, finding fixed points, etc. We’ll use simple simulators of neural dynamics to understand the basics and be solving linear equations in the first hour. We’ll then scale up our understanding to dynamic fields, again working with simulators to ground our understanding. Next, we’ll add memory traces to think about learning and development, and then embed all of this into large scale architectures. In the afternoon, we’ll reconvene and learn how to build a DF model from scratch using our object-oriented coding language, COSIVINA. We’ll do this in a simple example taken from work by Thelen and colleagues modelling infant’s performance in the Piagetia A-not-B task. We’ll then illustrate how to move beyond this simple case, doing some show-and-tell from recent models of word learning and executive function.

 

New methods in infant social neuroscience

Time: 09:00 – 16:00 (TBC)

Location: Scottish Event Campus

Organisers: Sam Wass, University of East London

Almost all of our early waking lives are spent in the company of others. Understanding how the infant brain functions in social settings is important in itself – but it is also a vital gateway to understanding early development in other cognitive domains, such as attention and emotion regulation (Redcay & Warnell, 2018).

Although the past 20 years have seen rapid growth in our knowledge of how the infant brain processes social information (Grossmann, 2015), there remain important methodological challenges. First, most neuroimaging setups can only record from one brain at once – and are thus poorly positioned to measure social interaction, which by definition is bidirectional. Second, the practical challenges of measuring brain function in awake infants mean that conclusions are often drawn from limited samples. Third, the historical paucity of neuroimaging methods has led to an over-reliance on EEG.

In this workshop, we present recent developments in infant neuroimaging. In the morning, we summarise recent developments using the full variety of methods that are available, including Electro-Encephalography (EEG), functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Techniques will include advanced approaches such as machine learning, adaptive sample techniques, and graph theory.

In the afternoon, we present an introduction to a new approach that is increasingly being used to study infant social interactions: dyadic neuroimaging studies using either dual-EEG or dual-fNIRS. These techniques, which involve recording from two interacting brains concurrently, provide a radical new approach to studying social interaction. We outline some theoretical and underlying computational principles, and summarise current research.

 


Morning Workshops: 09:00 – 12:00

FIT'NG your analysis to your questions: Decision points in infant imaging

Time: 09:00 – 12:00 (TBC)

Location: Scottish Event Campus

Organisers: 

Fetal, Infant, & Toddler Neuroimaging Group (FIT’NG)

Alice Graham, PhD

Brittany R. Howell, PhD

Marisa Spann, PhD, MPH

Dustin Scheinost, PhD

Lilla Zollei, PhD

Presenters:

Brittany R. Howell, PhD

Fralin Biomedical Research Institute at VTC

Dept. of Human Development and Family Science

Virginia Tech

Roanoke, VA, USA

 

Deanne Thompson, PhD

Murdoch Children’s Research Institute

The Royal Children’s Hospital

Parkville, Victoria, Australia

 

Emma Robinson, PhD

Biomedical Engineering

King’s College London

London, UK

 

Lilla Zollei, PhD

Radiology

Harvard Medical School

A.A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging

Massachusetts General Hospital

Charlestown, MA, USA

 

Summary:

What is FIT’NG? We are a group of Fetal Infant Toddler Neuroimagers trying to help one another learn and disseminate best practices to advance the field. We are holding satellite workshops, meetings and informal gatherings around conferences to increase dialogue and collaboration.

This FIT’NG workshop will provide attendees with an overview of topics and decision points that are critical for conducting neuroimaging studies with infant participants. Topics to be covered include data acquisition, initial quality control, and data processing relevant to structural brain imaging. This workshop will focus on successful analysis of structural imaging as it is a critical first step to analyzing other modalities. This workshop is designed to support attendees in making analysis decisions based on their own research questions. For example, a study of volumetric change across time may benefit from approaches that are not well suited for a study of group differences at a single time point. We will consider these two scenarios, specifically longitudinal and cross-sectional questions, in structural imaging in infants younger than 12 months old. The workshop is organized into three sections: 1) sequence selection and hardware considerations (Dr. Brittany Howell), 2) preprocessing (i.e. skull stripping, segmentation) (Dr. Deanne Thompson), and 3) registration challenges in this unique population (Dr. Emma Robinson and Dr. Lilla Zollei). This workshop is in no way meant to be exhaustive, or to endorse a specific set of software or approaches, but rather will provide attendees with a working knowledge of a set of analysis techniques, resources, and decision points they can take with them to analyze their own data. After attending this workshop attendees will feel more confident that they know at what points during processing it is important to assess their data and results, and to make decisions as to whether or not the approaches they are applying are appropriate for the questions they are aiming to answer.

 

Tutorial on using head-mounted eye tracking in infant research

Time: 09:00 – 12:00 (TBC)

Location: Scottish Event Campus

Organisers: Chen Yu, Indiana University

 

 


Afternoon Workshops: 13:00 – 16:00

Facial Action Coding System for infants and young children (Baby FACS): Methods and research strategies

Time: 13:00 – 16:00 (TBC)

Location: Scottish Event Campus

Organisers:

Harriet Oster, New York University

Marco Dondi, Ferrara University

 

Widening our view: Opportunities and challenges in measuring linguistic input, processing, and development across languages and cultures

Time: 13:00 – 16:00 (TBC)

Location: Scottish Event Campus

Organisers: Marisa Casillas, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

The current standard model of language learning proposes that child-directed speech drives learning such that higher quantities of (quality) input are assumed to lead to larger vocabularies and faster processing, with effects on phonology and morphosyntax. However, much of the research on this topic has come from a narrow, WEIRD slice of the human population. Efforts to investigate this ‘standard’ model in non-English-speaking, non-Western, and sociopolitically diverse contexts have shown inspiring preliminary results but have also highlighted the difficulty of comparably measuring input, uptake, and processing across distinct languages and cultures.

Our aim in this workshop is to collectively define the major challenges and next steps forward in promoting high-quality, comparable, child language research as the ‘standard model’ is tested in more and more diverse populations around the world (this includes, e.g., understudied Western populations).

The workshop will consist of: (1) brief presentations on how standard methods have been used and adapted in different test sites (2) two small-group brainstorming challenges, focusing on methodological priorities and possible solutions, each culminating in whole-group guided discussion, and (3) brief brainstorm sessions and presentations regarding how the solutions could be adequately implemented post-workshop. Materials, resources, and ideas resulting from the workshop will be widely shared for continued discussion following ICIS 2020.

 


17:00 – 18:00

Presidential Address: Lisa Oakes, ICIS President

More information coming soon…

 


18:30 – 20:00

Presidential Reception: Glasgow Science Centre

ICIS have exclusive access to Glasgow Science Centre for the reception. It’s a great chance for delegates to connect with friends and colleagues, and explore the centre.

Bring the family to Glasgow and come along to this wonderful venue on opening night! See science and technology presented in unique and inspiring ways – for all ages.

Glasgow Science Centre Photograph by Martin Shields Tel 07572 457000 www.martinshields.com © Martin Shields

08:30 – 09:30

Keynote Speaker: Josep Call

Josep Call, University of St Andrews

Topic: Comparative Cognition

Click here for more information on Joseph Call…

 


09:30 – 09:45

Transition break


09:45 – 11:15

DARPA Symposium: Machine Common Sense: Using Infant Psychology to Build Better AI

Organiser: Victoria Romero, Next Century

Modern Artificial Intelligence is capable of impressive feats of learning, such as face recognition, voice to text transcription, and predictive customer support. However, it remains remarkably free of common sense. Although AI programs can provide simple factual information quickly, they are notoriously bad at the types of simple comprehension that humans find effortless. Asking Google “Who was president when Lincoln was born?” yields a lot of information about Lincoln, but none at all about James Madison (who was president when Lincoln was born). Asking a machine if an elephant can fit through a doorway results in a lot of jokes, but no information that would help a robot decide if it might reasonably attempt such a deed. To date, even advanced machine learning algorithms provide only narrow, very specialized “intelligence,” and their path to this content is often obscured in a black box.  Common sense—the things that almost all people understand about how the world works—has never been successfully instilled in a machine. This is partly because common sense relies on background knowledge that human beings accumulate as we develop from conception into adulthood. This is knowledge that includes intuitions such as how the physical world works, how people are motivated, and how agents and objects interact. Therefore, in attempting to build more human-like AI systems, we might do well to heed Alan Turing, who asked, “Instead of trying to produce a programme to simulate the adult mind, why not rather try to produce one which simulates the child’s?” A truly developmental approach to AI could yield breakthroughs that might be impossible with any other approach.

In the interest of advancing the science of Machine Common Sense (MCS), the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has funded a large-scale project that will allow close collaboration between developmental psychologists and AI engineers. This project involves three teams that will be working in the coming years to develop machine agents capable of responding in controlled circumstances as infants of various ages would normally respond in those circumstances. These teams represent a variety of theoretical viewpoints on how development and cognition proceeds in infancy. They consist of scientists from Harvard, MIT, IBM, and Stanford (Cora), Berkeley, Carnegie Mellon, and the University of Michigan (MESS), and Oregon State, New York University, and the University of Utah (OPICS). An additional team has been assigned the task of designing the virtual contexts and tasks in which the machine agents will be evaluated; this team, called PIAGET (Psychometric Intelligent Agent Graphical Environment and Testbed), consists of scientists from Next Century Corporation, Barnard College, New York University, the University of California at Davis, and Pitzer College/Claremont Graduate University. Today’s roundtable will feature representatives from DARPA as well as from each of the four teams working on this project. Short presentations by the panelists will be followed by a question-and-answer session. This symposium will keep infancy researchers abreast of the new MCS project, and afford the teams the opportunity to hear a variety of viewpoints at this nascent stage of the program.

Speakers:

DARPA: Matt Turek

Cora AI Team: Elizabeth Spelke (Harvard University) & Joshua Tenenbaum (MIT)

MESS AI Team: Alison Gopnik & Celeste Kidd (University of California- Berkeley)

OPICS AI Team: Karen Adolph (NYU)

PIAGET Evaluation Team: David Moore (Pitzer College/ Claremont Graduate University), Koleen McCrink (Barnard College, Columbia University), and Victoria Romero (Next Century)

 

Parallel Symposium Sessions

More information coming soon…

 


11:15 – 11:45

Coffee Break


11:45 – 13:15

Invited Session: Nivedita Mani

Click here for more information on Nivedita Mani…

 

Learning Sciences Exchange (LSX) Symposium - Smashing Disciplinary Silos for the Good of Children: Introducing the Learning Sciences Exchange

In combination with the New America Foundation and the Jacobs Foundation, ICIS is about to launch the second class of the Learning Sciences Exchange, or LSX. Created to attract exceptional mid-career fellows who are passionate about working across disciplines to improve the lives of young children and families, these fellows are from the world of journalism, science of learning, educational policy and entertainment. This session begins with an overview of the LSX experience, followed by presentations by members of the three teams who will describe what they learned from their participation and how we can work across disciplinary boundaries to strengthen the ways we translate science into practice.

Panelists will include:

Robert Carpenter, Director, University of Southern California’s Media Institute for Social Change

Catherine de Lange, Biomedical Features Editor, New Scientist

Melissa Hogenboom, Senior Science Journalist, BBC Global News

Sacha Kyle, Theater and Television Creator, director of CBeebies

Lisa Scott, Psychology Department, University of Florida; Director of the Brain, Cognition and Development Research Laboratory.

 


13:15 – 14:30

Lunch Break (on own)

There are conveniently located cafes and restaurants onsite at the SEC. If you want to stretch your legs, the SEC is a 5 minute walk from Argyle Street in the Finnieston area, considered a ‘culinary hub‘ in Glasgow.

Click here for map

Lunch Workshop - sponsored by Procter and Gamble - Baby’s sleep & its effect on baby’s development

Dr. Addyman and Dr Sarah Lloyd-Fox will share some of their recent research results. Dr. Frank Wiesemann will share Pampers’ research on baby development and it’s application in product development and communication to parents.

Dr. Addyman is also presenting and signing his new book “the Laughing baby”!

Confirmed panelists:

Dr. Caspar Addyman, Goldsmiths, University of London

Comparing sleep patterns and morning mood between Brazilian and British babies

Two samples of parents took part in study to investigate infant sleep and how it related to temperament, mood and other factors. Parents in Sao Paulo, Brazil (N=117) completed 10 sleep diary about their infants (53 female infants, mean age 13.9 months), together with a temperament measure (IBQ-R) and demographic data. Parents in the United Kingdom (N=142, 74 female infants, ) answered same questions but over a 21 day period (3×7 blocks). In both cases analysis revealed that bedtime and diaper type were significant predictors of sleep duration. This and other results will be discussed.

Dr Sarah Lloyd-Fox, University of Cambridge

Measuring sleep in families living in rural Gambia

The Brain Imaging in Global Health (BRIGHT) Study which has been measuring sleep patterns of infants living in rural Gambia. Some of the findings of this study will be shared, and also some of the challenges and interesting results associated with measuring sleep in a population who use a verbal (non-written) language, do not systematically measure time using a 24 hour clock and have a diverse, often multiple, caregiver family structure.

Dr Frank Wiesemann, Procter & Gamble German Innovation Center

Assessing sleep quality of infants in their homes

Infants sleep quality is a major concern area for parents, as it influences infant’s development but also the quality of life of the whole family. Therefore it is important to assess sleep quality of infants in their normal environment. The presentation will share results of several studies with different tools and study designs to assess infant sleep quality and factors impacting it. It will further be discussed how academia and industry researchers can effectively collaborate to assist parents in supporting their babies’ sleep quality.

 

 


14:30 – 16:00

Invited Session: Maria de Hevia

Please click here for more information on Maria de Hevia…

 

Parallel Symposium Sessions

More information coming soon…

 


16:00 – 18:00

Posters and Exhibitors

08:30 – 09:30

Presidential Symposium

Sarah Lloyd Fox, University of Cambridge

Topic: Global Health – Gambia project

Seth Pollak, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Topic: Global Health – low SES in USA

Kim Noble, Columbia University

Topic: Global Health – SES disparities USA

Michael Thomas, Birkbeck, University of London

Topic: Global Health – genetics

Click here for more information on the Presidential Symposium speakers

 


09:30 – 09:45

Transition break


09:45 – 11:15

Invited Session for early stage researchers and students: Diane Poulin Dubois

Diane Poulin Dubois, Concordia University

Working title: Top tips I have learned during my career

Click here for more information on Diane Poulin Dubois…

 

Parallel Symposium Sessions

More information coming soon…

 


11:15 – 11:45

Coffee Break


11:45 – 13:15

Views by 2: Group 1 - Bayesian models vs. Process models

Denis Mareschal, Birkbeck, University of London

Michael Frank, Department of Psychology, Stanford University

Click here for more information on the Views by 2 speakers

 

Views by 2: Group 2 - Infant Social Cognition

Emese Nagy, University of Dundee

Victoria Southgate, University of Copenhagen

Click here for more information on the Views by 2 speakers

 

Views by 2: Group 3 - Language

Larissa Samuelson, University of East Anglia

Judit Gervain, CNRS Paris, France

Click here for more information on the Views by 2 speakers

 


13:15 – 14:30

Lunch Break (on own)

There are conveniently located cafes and restaurants onsite at the SEC. If you want to stretch your legs, the SEC is a 5 minute walk from Argyle Street in the Finnieston area, considered a ‘culinary hub‘ in Glasgow.

Click here for map

 


14:30 – 16:00

Invited Session: Dima Amso

Please click here for more information on Dima Amso…

 

Student led symposium

Organised by the ICIS 2020 Student Committee

More information coming soon…

 

Parallel Symposium Sessions

More information coming soon…

 


16:00 – 18:00

Posters and Exhibitors

08:30 – 09:30

Keynote Speaker: Clare Elwell

Clare Elwell, University College London

Topic: Neuroscience/Methods/Global Health

Click here for more information on Clare Elwell…

 


09:30 – 10:15

Awards / Business Meeting


10:15 – 12:15

Posters and Exhibitors


12:15 – 13:15

Lunch Break (on own)

There are conveniently located cafes and restaurants onsite at the SEC. If you want to stretch your legs, the SEC is a 5 minute walk from Argyle Street in the Finnieston area, considered a ‘culinary hub‘ in Glasgow.

Click here for map

 


13:15 – 14:45

Invited session: Vanessa Lobue

Click here for more information on Vanessa Lobue…

 

Parallel Symposium Sessions

More information coming soon…

 


14:45 – 15:00

Transition break


15:00 – 16:30

Parallel Symposium Sessions

More information coming soon…

 


16:30 – 16:45

Transition break


16:45 – 18:15

Parallel Symposium Sessions

More information coming soon…

 


Thank you to our 2020 Sponsors & Exhibitors!