Program

We’re pleased to announce the vICIS 2020 program.

The conference proceedings will be scheduled to run twice daily over the dates of the conference:

Conference Proceedings 1: July 6 – 9, from 12:00 – 18:00, British Summer Time (BST)

Conference Proceedings 2: July 6 – 9, from 11:00 – 17:00, Pacific Daylight Time (PDT)

We recommend that you follow this 3-step guide for getting the most out of vICIS 2020:

Select your time zone

Please review the program in your time zone (or closest), by clicking on the tabs in the program proceedings below. You can determine which proceedings work best for your schedule. You are welcome to attend one or both sets of proceedings each day – and there will be an ‘on demand’ service available to view sessions in your own time

View live or pre-recorded content

The webinars and live Q&As for invited sessions will take place in Conference Proceedings 1 (BST), with pre-recorded versions available during Conference proceedings 2 (PDT). For symposia and poster live Q&A’s, the timings will depend on the participants’ location.

Make Connections

The vICIS platform has a live messaging function to facilitate Q&A and discussion with posters and talks. There are dedicated chat lounges, based on various topics and themes for like-minded attendees to covene and engage.  We encourage all attendees to utilise the chat function to connect with researchers from all over the globe.

Conference Proceedings 1 (BST)

*Sessions available on demand next day

Day 1: July 6

12:00-13:30  Poster Session 1


 

13:30-15:00  Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.1  Early language across-cultures: Input, language processes and outcome measures

Chair: Laia Fibla, University of East Anglia

S1.i:   Marisa Casillas, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

Day-wide patterns in the use of child-directed speech in two non-Western, subsistence farming communities

S1.ii:   Camila Scaff,  University of Zurich

Exploring conversational turns and partners among Tsimane forager-horticulturalists

S1.iii:   Alejandrina Cristia, CNRS, PSL University

Spontaneous vocalizations from birth to age four: Insights from a mega-analysis of 13,785 hours of audio

S1.iv:   Laia Fibla, University of East Anglia

Early language processing and language exposure across-cultures: UK and India

S1 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) with some speakers being available during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.2 Environmental influences on infant attention: A global perspective

Chair: Sarah Lloyd-Fox, University of Cambridge

S2.i:   Samantha McCann, King’s College London

Undernutrition in infancy impacts early brain development in The Gambia: An fNIRS study

S2.ii:   Annie Brandes-Aitken, New York University

Contributions of cumulative parent cortisol to the neural underpinnings of infant attention and emotion regulation

S2.iii:   Sam Wass, University of East London

Physiological stress, sustained attention and cognitive engagement in 12-month-old infants from urban environments

S2 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.3 Investigating the relationship between representing the self and the other in early development

Chair: Victoria Southgate, University of Copenhagen

S3.i:   Chiara Bulgarelli, University College London

The role of self-awareness in selective facial mimicry of native over foreign speakers

S3.ii:   Dora Kampis, University of Copenhagen

The mapping of others to oneself in 16-26-old infants

S3.iii:   Josephine Ross, University of Dundee

Autocentric or allocentric? Exploring the co-development of self-representation and positive social behavior

S3.iv:   Milica Nikolic, University of Amsterdam

Implicit self-recognition in infancy predicts self-conscious emotional reactivity in childhood

 

S.4 Early markers for neurodevelopmental disorders: Towards the identification of trajectories to atypical cognitive outcomes

Chairs: Viola Macchi Cassia, University of Milano-Bicocca & Chiara Cantiani, Scientific Institute, IRCCS Medea

S4.i:   Valeria Costanzo, IRCCS Stella Maris Foundation

Social and non-social early markers of ASD: The relationship between disengagement of attention and joint attention in high-risk siblings at 12 months of life

S4.ii:   Valentina Riva, Scientific Institute, IRCCS Medea

Atypical ERP responses to multisensory integration in infants at risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder

S4.iii:   Roberta Bettoni, University of Milano-Bicocca

Visual implicit learning abilities in infants at familial risk for Development Language Disorder

S4.iv:   Gaia Scherif, Oxford University

Understanding variable outcomes in genetic syndromes: The importance of early developmental phenotyping

S4 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.5 The rhythm of our heart and mind: Neurophysiological responses to communicative rhythms in parent-infant interactions

Chair: Trinh Nguyen, University of Vienna

S5.i:   Trinh Nguyen, University of Vienna

The role of physiological synchrony for attachment

S5.ii:   Christina Schätz, University of Vienna

Effects of maternal infant-directed singing on infant physiological arousal

S5.iii:   Ira Marriott Haresign, The University of East London

Mutual gaze leads to phase reorganization and concomitant short-term increases in interpersonal neural synchrony

S5.iv: Shir Atzil, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

S5 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

13:30-18:00  Poster Session 1 (available on demand)


15:15-15:30  Welcoming remarks with ICIS President Lisa Oakes


15:30-16:30 Live Symposium Sessions

Invited Session: Solutions for studying development in clinical settings (60 minutes with live Q&A)

Bridgette Kelleher, Purdue University

Evelyne Mercure, Goldsmiths, University of London

Susan Rivera, University of California Davis (moderator)

 

Webinar: How to have effective collaborations: Advice from the Manybabies team (60 minutes)

Christina Bergmann, Max Planck Institute

Kiley Hamlin, University of British Columbia

Krista Byers-Heinlein, Concordia University

Casey Lew-Williams, Princeton (moderator)


 

16:30-18:00  Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.6  Timing is everything: The temporal dynamics of labeling in typical and atypical language development

Chair: Jill Lany, University of Liverpool

S6.i:   Jill Lany, University of Liverpool

The temporal dynamics of labeling shape object recognition

S6.ii:   Michael Goldstein, Cornell University

Relative contributions of infant-directed speech and motion when learning new words

S6.iii:   Madhavilatha Maganti, Ashoka University

Maternal synchronous gesture adaptations during object naming to term and preterm infants: A longitudinal study

S6.iv:   Chi-hsin Chen, The Ohio State University

Children’s hearing loss affects the synchrony between parents’ object naming and children’s attention to objects in parent-child interactions

 

S.7  Individual differences in attentional control and executive functions in the first two years of life

Chair: Alexandra Hendry, University of Oxford

S7.i:   Maria Rosario Rueda, University of Granada

Early development of the executive attention network in infancy

S7.ii:   Martha Ann Bell, Virginia Tech

Monthly development of cognitive and attention inhibition in the first year

S7.iii:   Alexandra Hendry, University of Oxford

Inhibitory control at 10 and 16 months on the A-not-B task and the Early Childhood Inhibitory Touchscreen Task

S7 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.8 Parent and child contributions to emotion regulation: Beyond main effects to complex developmental pathways

Chair: Kaya de Barbaro, University of Texas at Austin

S8.i:   Lauren Bailes, University of North Carolina Greensboro

Mother and infant contributions to infant negative emotionality over time

S8.ii:   Kaya de Barbaro, University of Texas at Austin

Mama tried: Contingent responding to distress does not increase rate of real-time soothing in infants high in negative emotionality

S8.iii:   Niyantri Ravindran, The Pennsylvania State University

Parental structuring of toddler negative emotion predicts children’s use of distraction longitudinally

S8.iv: Maria Gartstein, Washington State University (Discussant)

S8 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.9  The role of action understanding in early sociomoral cognition

Chair: Brandon Woo, Harvard University

S9.i  Denis Tatone, Central European University

Twelve-month-old infants use payoff information to disambiguate the goals of agents involved in a joint activity

S9.ii:   Fransisca Ting, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

16-month-old infants perceive irrational individuals as having reduced moral rights

S9.iii:   Brandon Woo, Harvard University

Social cognition in context: Infants’ evaluations of helping in means-end sequences

S9.iv:   Elizabeth Enright, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Toddlers consider others’ goals when helping others

S.9 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only.

 

S.10  The I in team: Individual differences in infancy shape social competence and prosociality

Chair: Jess Aitken, University of Auckland

S10.i:   Robert Hepach, Leipzig University

Children’s positive emotions following helping others and seeing others being helped: Evidence for a developmental shift

S10.ii :   Jess Aitken, University of Auckland

Temperament and cooperative ability in infancy: Are effects of temperament mediated through children’s social behaviour during cooperative tasks?

S10.iii:   Amanda Brandone, Lehigh University

Developmental pathways from infant social cognition to later prosocial behavior and theory of mind

S10.iv:   Moritz Köster, Freie Universität Berlin

A developmental systems approach to early helping behavior

S.10 Q&A: Robert Hepach, Amanda Brandone & Moritz Köster will be available for questions during Congress Proceedings 1 (BST), with Amanda Brandone and Jess Aitken available for questions during both Congress Proceedings 1 (BST) and 2 (PDT)

 

18:00-19:00  End of Conference Proceedings 1 – Coffee / Cocktail hour

Day 2: July 7

12:00-13:30  Poster Session 2


 

13:30-15:00 Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.11  The origins of causal thought

Chair: Jonathan Kominsky, Rutgers University – Newark

S11.i:   Deon Benton, Brown University

Stop in the name of contact: How infants learn about the causal properties of people and objects

S11.ii:   Samantha Wood, Indiana University

Reverse engineering the origins of causal knowledge

S11.iii:   Katarina Begus, Rutgers University – Newark

Not all information is created equal: Investigating infants’ sensitivity to confounded information in a causal reasoning task

S11.iv:   Jonathan Kominsky, Rutgers University – Newark

Disconnected causal representations in the first year of life

S11 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

S.12 The structure and function of biobehavioral synchrony in early development

Chair: Bennett Bertenthal, Indiana University

S12.i:   Elizabeth daSilva, Indiana University-Purdue University Columbus

Infant-mother physiological synchrony moderates infants’ self-regulation

S12.ii:   Stefanie Höhl, University of Vienna

Tuned in: Neural synchrony in mother-infant dyads

S12.iii:   Elise Piazza, Princeton University

Neural synchrony predicts novel word learning from storybooks

S12.iv:   Megan Whitehorn, UEL

Parental frontal brain activity tracks infant attention during shared play

S12 Q&A: live questions taking place during both Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) and 2 (PDT) 

 

S.13 Rhythm perception in infants: Neural, pupillary, and motor entrainment to speech

Chair: Judit Gervain, Université Paris Descartes

S13.i:   Tineke M. Snijders, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

Tracking speech rhythm in the 7.5 month old infant brain is related to word segmentation performance at 9 months

S13.ii:   Áine Ní Choisdealbha, University of Cambridge

Changes in neural rhythmic entrainment during the first year of life

S13.iii:   Alan Langus, University of Potsdam

Individual variability in pupillary entrainment predicts speech segmentation with prosodic and statistical cues in infancy

S13.iv:   Natalie Boll-Avetisyan, University of Potsdam

Infants show spontaneous motor entrainment while listening to rhythmic speech

 

S.14 Understanding infants’ lives by the use of smartphones: Experience sampling and ambulatory assessment

Chair: Stephanie Wermelinger, University of Zurich

S14.i:   Sophie von Stumm, University of York

Using digital technologies for assessing infants’ cognitive development in real-time

S14.ii:   Nivedita Mani, University of Goettingen

Online testing technology for infant touchscreen and looking time tasks

S14.iii:   Stephanie Wermelinger, University of Zurich

Identifiying dynamic developmental processes during infancy by using the WeltentdeckerApp

S14 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

13:30-18:15  Poster Session 2 (available on demand)


 

15:00-16:30  Live Symposium Sessions

Invited Session: Secondary Data analysis of existing data files (90 minutes with live Q&A)

Michael Thomas, Birkbeck, University of London

Alex Cristia, CNRS

Marije Verhage, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam

Sarah Jensen, Boston College (moderator)

 

Invited Session: Online solutions for data collection (90 minutes minutes with live Q&A)

Rhodri Cusack, Trinity College Dublin

Emily Jone & Elena Throm, Birkbeck, University of London

Caspar Addyman, Goldsmiths, University of London

Natasha Kirkham, Birkbeck, University of London (moderator)


 

16:45-18:15  Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.15  Brain & Behavior: New insights into neural correlates of infant emotion regulation

Chair: Courtney Filippi, University of Maryland

S15.i:   Elina Thomas, Oregon Health and Science University

Newborn amygdala connectivity to prefrontal and sensory regions is associated with early emerging regulatory behavior

S15.ii:   Courtney Filippi, University of Maryland

Associations between amygdala connectivity and negative reactive temperament

S15.iii:   Chad Sylvester, Washington University

Maternal Anxiety and Neonatal Brain Response to Novel Sounds as Assessed with fMRI

S15 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.16  Insights from outside the lab: Modeling observational data to understand language learning

Chair: Mika Braginsky, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

S16.i:   Eva Portelance, Stanford University

Using neural network language models to predict age of acquisition for early vocabulary

S16.ii:   Stephan Meylan, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Characterizing child-directed listening with corpus and model-based analyses

S16.iii:   Mika Braginsky, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Characterizing the relationship between lexical and morphological development

S16.iv:   Georgia Loukatou, CNRS, PSL University

Assessing cross-linguistic viability of infant word segmentation models

S.16 Q&A: Georia Loukatou will be available for questions during Congress Proceedings 1 (BST), with Eva Portelance, Stephan Meylan & Mika Braginsky available for questions during both Congress Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.17 How multiple exemplars help infants and young children extend their knowledge

Chair: Jane Childers, Trinity University

S17.i:   Susan Graham, University of Calgary

Multiple exemplars facilitate 9-month-olds’ property generalizations

S17.ii:   Jane Childers, Trinity University

Extending verbs to new events: Does the comparison of events over delays help?

S17.iii:   Christina Schonberg, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Why do multiple examples help children learn words? The roles of aggregation, decontextualization, and memory dynamics

S17.iv:  Scott Johnson, University of California, Los Angeles

Discussant

S.17 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

S.18  Child evocative effects in the context of parenting across developmental systems: A behavioral and neurophysiological perspective

Chair: Diane Lickenbrock, Western Kentucky University

S18.i:   Kayla Brown, The Pennsylvania State University

Difficult temperament profiles and externalizing behaviors: The moderating effects on harsh parenting and dyadic inconsistency

S18.ii:   Berenice Anaya, Penn State University

Maternal anxiety and infant negative affect trajectories: The role of neural and environmental factors during infancy

S18.iii:   Diane Lickenbrock, Western Kentucky University

Infant physiological regulation with mothers and fathers: The effects of infant temperament and parent factors

S18 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.19  Fair’s fair?: Intentions and relationships impact infants’ expectations about fairness and preferences for fair individuals

Chair: Zoe Liberman, University of California Santa Barbara

S19.i:   Luca Surian, University of Trento

Preverbal infants’ intention-based evaluations of fairness

S19.ii:   Anna-Elisabeth Baumann, University of Chicago

Infants’ reactions to resource distribution outcomes as a function of ingroup/outgroup manipulations and language status

S19.iii:   Lin Bian, Cornell University

Do 4-month-olds take into account group membership when judging fair outcomes?

S19.iv:   Zoe Liberman, University of California Santa Barbara

Infants predict that distributors will act partially towards their friends

S.19 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

18:15-19:00  End of Conference Proceedings 1 – Coffee / Cocktail hour

Day 3: July 8

12:00-13:30  Poster Session 3


 

13:30-15:00  Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.20  Enhancing our understanding of social cognition in infancy through cutting-edge technology and individualized approaches

Chair: Giorgia Bussu, Radboud University Medical Center

S20.i:   Maheen Siddiqui, Birkbeck, University of London

Spatially resolved measures of cytochrome-c-oxidase during functional activation in infants

S20.ii:   David López Pérez, Institute of Psychology, Polish Academy of Sciences

Efficiency of scanning in infancy in the presence and absence of faces differentially predicts expressive and receptive language in toddlers

S20.iii:   Giorgia Bussu, Radboud University Medical Center

An individual approach to understand the nature of face processing in early autism

S20.iv:   Anna Gui, Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development, Birkbeck College, University of London

Neuroadaptive optimization to study how neural signatures of attention to faces in infants relate to later autism

S.20 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.21 Not just the linguistic factor! Associations between maternal child-directed speech and cognitive and socio-emotional competencies

Chair: Maria Spinelli, University G. D’Annunzio Chieti-Pescara

Discussant: Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, Temple University

S21.i:   Prachi Shah, University of Michigan

Parent language stimulation, parent sensitivity and socioeconomic status: Associations with curiosity

S21.ii:   Chiara Suttora, University of Bologna

The role of maternal verbal input in the emergence of mental lexicon in early childhood

S21.iii:   Maria Spinelli, University G. D’Annunzio Chieti-Pescara

Talk to me mum! The longitudinal effects of prosodic and linguistic characteristics of infant directed speech on the development of child attention and emotion regulation

S21.iv:   Brianna McMillan, Temple University

Fluid, back-and-forth conversation sets a foundation for infant executive function skills

S.21 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

S.22 Tips, tricks, and statistics: Recommendations for improving infant research methods

Chair: Lena V. Kremin, Concordia University

S22.i:   Esther Schott, Concordia University

Tools for transparency: Practical tips for sharing your research

S22.ii:   Lena V. Kremin, Concordia University

Let the data do the talking: Optimizing visualizations for transparency and readability

S22.iii:   Nivedita Mani, University of Goettingen

Bayesian sequential testing in developmental research

S22.iv:   Alejandrina Cristia, ENS, EHESS, CNRS, PSL University

Using long-form recordings to study infants’ speech input and outcomes: Opportunities and challenges

S22 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.23 Building contingency: How caregiver and child characteristics relate to interactions that support infant language

Chair: Lillian Masek, Temple University

S23.i:   Rebecca Alper, Temple University

One is not enough: Understanding variability in early language interaction quality using parent self-efficacy and developmental knowledge profiles

S23.ii:   Lillian Masek, Temple University

Building fluid and connected conversation: How caregiver speech differentially relates to interaction quality

S23.iii:   Rufan Luo, Rutgers University, Camden

Maternal question use and child language outcomes: The moderating role of SES and children’s concurrent vocabulary

S.23 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

13:30-18:00  Poster Session 3 (available on demand)


 

15:00-16:15 Live Symposium Sessions

Invited Session: Modeling development from existing data (75 minutes with Q&A)

Gert Westermann, Lancaster University

Jochen Triesch, Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies

Katherine Twomey, University of Manchester (moderator)

Live Webinar: Data Repositories: Resources for studying development (75 minutes)

Karen Adolph, New York University

Marisa Casillas, Max Planck Institute

Brian MacWhinney, Carnegie Mellon University

Caitlin Fausey, University of Oregon (moderator)


 

16:30-18:00  Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.24  Novel technologies to assess language development in infants

Chair: Julien Mayor, University of Oslo

S24.i:   Virginia Marchman, Stanford University

Using web-based platforms to expand the socioeconomic reach of parent report measures of vocabulary development

S24.ii:   Julien Mayor, University of Oslo

BabyLex-IRT: Estimating early vocabulary sizes using a Bayesian-inspired item-response theory approach

S24.iii:   Camila Scaff, University of Zurich

Socio-economic status and word comprehension in early childhood: A study in a low inequality setting and a meta-analytic review

S24.iv:   Amanda Seidl, Purdue University

The development of canonical babble in a crosslinguistic and cross-cultural corpus

S24 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.25: Embracing new technologies to quantify early learning environments

Chair: Sara Schroer, Indiana University

S25.i:   Sara Schroer, Indiana University

Hands-on learning: Toddler’s multimodal attention at naming moments leads to successful word learning

S25.ii:   George Kachergis, Stanford University

Automatically detecting children’s visual access to social information in egocentric videos

S25.iii:   Marisa Casillas, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

The linguistic landscapes of learning in two small-scale societies

S25.iv:   Mira Nencheva, Princeton University

Analyzing emotion in language input: Caregivers’ cues to valence support toddlers’ learning of emotion words

S.25 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) and Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.26 Updates from the ManyBabies Consortium: Four collaborative replications of important findings in infancy research

Chair: Michael Frank, Stanford University

S26.i:   Angeline Sin Mei Tsui, Stanford University

ManyBabies 1B: Testing bilinguals’ preference for infant-directed speech

S26.ii:   Dora Kampis, University of Copenhagen

ManyBabies 2: Theory of mind in infancy

S26.iii:   Ingmar Visser, University of Amsterdam

ManyBabies 3: Infant rule learning: a multi-lab replication study

S26.iv:   Kelsey Lucca, Arizona State University

ManyBabies 4: A large-scale, multi-lab, coordinated replication study of infants’ social evaluations

S26 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.27  Real-world interactions in Real Time: Moment-to-moment dynamics of parent-infant joint engagement in naturalistic contexts

Chair: Catalina Suarez-Rivera, New York University

S27.i:   Chen Yu, Indiana University

Multiple sensorimotor pathways to parent-infant coordinated attention in naturalistic toy play

S27.ii:   Betina Karshaleva, University of California, San Diego

Infant vocalizations and maternal speech in naturalistic play: Contingencies from 4 to 12 months

S27.iii:   Catalina Suarez-Rivera, New York University

Everyday joint engagement: Coupling of the mothers body with the infants manual actions

S27.iv:   Jacob Schatz, New York University

Playing and learning together: Spontaneous joint engagement scaffolds infant play at home

S27 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.28  Exploring the circumstances in which infants attribute dispositions to agents

Chair: Megan Pronovost, California State University, Fresno

S28.i:   You-jung Choi, Harvard University

Three-month-old infants’ understanding of a human agent’s preference

S28.ii:   Su-hua Wang, University of California, Santa Cruz

Self-experience scaffolds infants’ reasoning about preference

S28.iii:   Lin Bian, Cornell University

8-month-olds attribute, and expect others to attribute, strong preferences to agents

S28.iv:   Megan Pronovost, California State University, Fresno

20-month-old infants’ attribution of behavioral dispositions to agents

S.28 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

18:00-18:45  End of Conference Proceedings 1 – Coffee / Cocktail hour

Day 4: July 9

12:00-13:30  Poster Session 4


 

13:30-15:00  Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.29  Integrating computational and neuroimaging methods to investigate infant cognitive development

Chair: Laurie Bayet, American University

S29.i:   Benjamin Zinszer, Princeton University

Decoding representations of familiar objects in young infants using fNIRS

S29.ii:   Laurie Bayet, American University

Time-course and properties of higher-order visual representations in the infant brain

S29.iii:   Rhodri Cusack, Trinity College Dublin

Deep neural networks as a model of learning during the helpless period of infancy

S29.iv:   Nicholas Turk-Browne, Yale University

Adult-grade cognitive neuroscience in infants

S29 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.30 The reciprocal roles of parents and children in organizing learning opportunities in dyadic interaction

Chair: Steven Elmlinger, Cornell University

Discussant: Michael Goldstein, Cornell University

S30.i:   Miriam Langeloh, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences

Are you like me? Contingent adult-infant interactions in a naturalistic dual-EEG paradigm

S30.ii:   Steven Elmlinger, Cornell University

The development of prelinguistic vocal sequences: implications for early communication and language

S30.iii:   Sara Schroer, Indiana University

Toddler vocalizations shape the structure of parent-child interactions

S30.iv:   Katharina Rohlfing, Paderborn University

Do maternal vocalizations scaffold children to take up an active role in peekaboo routine?

S.30 Q&A:  All presenters available to take questions during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST). Steven Elmlinger, Sara Schroer, and Katharina Rolfing are available during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT). Discussant: Michael Goldstein is available for both Q&A sessions

 

S.31 Fine-grained environmental data illuminate the process of language learning

Chair: Daniel Swingley, University of Pennsylvania

S31.i  Daniel Swingley, University of Pennsylvania

How learning word-forms could guide infants to phonetic categories: New evidence from English

S31.ii:   Catherine Tamis-LeMonda, New York University

The food for thought: Unpacking the everyday language experiences of infants

S31.iii:   Chen Yu, Indiana University

Rethinking input: The infant’s view challenges the problem of referential uncertainty in early word learning

S31.iv:   Emmanuel Dupoux, EHESS

Reverse engineering early language acquisition: Can machine learning help?

S31 Q&A: live questions taking place with all speakers during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST), with some speakers being available during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.32 What can video coding tell us about infant development? Methodological examples and new results from two preterm infant cohorts

Chair: Sue Fletcher-Watson, University of Edinburgh

S32.i:   Bethan Dean, University of Edinburgh

Longitudinal assessment of social cognition in infants born preterm using eye-tracking and parent-child play

S32.ii:   Sinead O’Carroll, University of Edinburgh

Frequency and type of parental gesture during parent-child play is influenced by socioeconomic status and gestational age at birth

S32.iii:   Lorna Ginnell, University of Edinburgh

Reduced emotional response to the still-face paradigm in preterm infants

S.32 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.33 Parent-infant interaction styles in diverse populations and their impact on infant development

Chair: Sarah Lloyd-Fox, Cambridge University

S33.i:   Bosiljka Milosavljevic, Birkbeck, University of London

Mother-infant interactions, maternal mental health and infant cognitive outcomes in The Gambia

S33.ii:   Ciara Kelly, University of Sheffield

The communication of deaf infants with hearing parents

S33.iii:   Evelyne Mercure, Goldsmiths, University of London

Deaf mothers and their hearing infants: Social interaction, maternal sensitivity and language development

S33.iv:   Atsushi Senju, Birkbeck, University of London

Development of social attention and communication in infants of blind parents

S.33 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

13:30-18:00  Poster Session 4 (available on demand)


 

15:00-16:30 Live Symposium Sessions

 

Invited Session: Solutions for studying early language development (90 minutes with live Q&A)

Katie Alcock, Lancaster University

Mike Frank, Stanford

Elizabeth Norton, Northwestern

Jessica Horst, University of Sussex (moderator)

Webinar: Stress and Development live webinar (75 minutes)

Marion van den Heuvel, Tilburg University

Dima Amso, Brown University

Natasha Kirkham, Birkbeck, University of London

Brittney Chere, Birkbeck, University of London (moderator)


 

16:30-18:00  Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.34  Parent-infant interactions and language development in infants with communication disorders

Chair: Yuanyuan Wang, Ohio State University

S34.i :   Yuanyuan Wang, Ohio State University

The effects of hearing loss on the social feedback loop in infants with cochlear implants

S34.ii:   Girija Kadlaskar, Purdue University

Caregiver touch-speech communication and infant responses in 12-month-olds at high risk for autism spectrum disorder

S34.iii:   John Bunce, California State University East Bay

Why do I keep repeating myself? Exploring how parental assumptions of children’s comprehension effects word repetition patterns

S34.iv:   Derek Houston, The Ohio State University

Parent-infant interactions and word-learning skills in deaf infants with cochlear implants

S34 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.35  Novel approaches to electroencephalogram (EEG) lateralization: Beyond traditional asymmetry

Chair: Maria Gartstein, Washington State University

S35.i:   Maria Gartstein, Washington State University

EEG frontal asymmetry changes during emotion-eliciting tasks and parent-child interaction dynamics

S35.ii:   Ross Vanderwert, Cardiff University

Individual differences in frontal asymmetry while viewing emotion faces: A capability model approach

S35.iii:   Martha Ann Bell, Virginia Tech

Predictors of level of negative affect after arm restraint at 5 months

S35.iv:   Nancy Jones, Florida Atlantic University

Infant neurophysiological patterns and temperament are linked to maternal depressive symptoms

S.35 Q&A:  Ross Vanderwert will be available for questions during Congress Proceedings 1 (BST), with Maria Gartstein, Martha Ann Bell and Nancy Jones available for questions during Congress Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.36 Learning ‘hard words’: The role of conceptual representations when the tough gets tougher

Chair: Laura Lakusta, Montclair State University

S36.i:   Nicolò Cesana Arlotti, Johns Hopkins University

An investigation of the origins of logical quantification: Infant’s (and adult’s) representations of exhaustivity in collective or individual complex actions

S36.ii:   Ariel Starr, University of Washington

Spatial metaphor facilitates word learning

S36.iii:   Laura Lakusta, Montclair State University

Getting support for ‘support’: The privileging of ‘Support-From-Below’ in early spatial language acquisition

S.36 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

S.37 Cultural differences in mind-mindedness and infant-mother interaction

Chair: Elizabeth Meins, University of York

S37.i:   Catherine McMahon, Macquarie University

Cross-cultural comparison of maternal mind-mindedness among Australian and Chinese mothers of toddlers

S37.ii:   Yujin Lee, University of York

How does culture and empathy relate to mothers’ mind-mindedness?

S37.iii:  Nao Fujita, University of Cambridge

A cross-cultural comparison of maternal mind-mindedness and speech characteristics between Japan and the UK

S37.iv:   Katie Slocombe, University of York

Cross-cultural differences in mother-infant play behaviour

S.37 Q&A:  Katie Slocombe, Nao Fujita and Yujin Lee will be available for questions during Congress Proceedings 1 (BST), with Cathy McMahon being available for questions during Congress Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.38  Better safe than sorry: Infants’ use of social information to reason and learn about threat

Chair: Shari Liu, Harvard University

S38.i:   Shari Liu, Harvard University

Dangerous ground: Thirteen-month-old infants are sensitive to peril in other people’s actions

S38.ii:   Camille Rioux, Max Planck Institute for Human Development

Social information reduces infants’ avoidance of plants

S38.iii:   Tobias Grossmann, University of Virginia

Friend or foe? Impression formation in the human infant brain

S38.iv:   Zoe Liberman, University of California Santa Barbara

Not all negative emotions are equal: Infants selectively attend to threat

S.38 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

18:00-19:00  End of Conference Proceedings 1 – Coffee / Cocktail hour

*Sessions available on demand next day

Day 1: July 6

07:00-08:30  Poster Session 1


 

08:30-10:00  Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.1  Early language across-cultures: Input, language processes and outcome measures

Chair: Laia Fibla, University of East Anglia

S1.i:   Marisa Casillas, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

Day-wide patterns in the use of child-directed speech in two non-Western, subsistence farming communities

S1.ii:   Camila Scaff,  University of Zurich

Exploring conversational turns and partners among Tsimane forager-horticulturalists

S1.iii:   Alejandrina Cristia, CNRS, PSL University

Spontaneous vocalizations from birth to age four: Insights from a mega-analysis of 13,785 hours of audio

S1.iv:   Laia Fibla, University of East Anglia

Early language processing and language exposure across-cultures: UK and India

S1 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) with some speakers being available during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.2 Environmental influences on infant attention: A global perspective

Chair: Sarah Lloyd-Fox, University of Cambridge

S2.i:   Samantha McCann, King’s College London

Undernutrition in infancy impacts early brain development in The Gambia: An fNIRS study

S2.ii:   Annie Brandes-Aitken, New York University

Contributions of cumulative parent cortisol to the neural underpinnings of infant attention and emotion regulation

S2.iii:   Sam Wass, University of East London

Physiological stress, sustained attention and cognitive engagement in 12-month-old infants from urban environments

S2 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.3 Investigating the relationship between representing the self and the other in early development

Chair: Victoria Southgate, University of Copenhagen

S3.i:   Chiara Bulgarelli, University College London

The role of self-awareness in selective facial mimicry of native over foreign speakers

S3.ii:   Dora Kampis, University of Copenhagen

The mapping of others to oneself in 16-26-old infants

S3.iii:   Josephine Ross, University of Dundee

Autocentric or allocentric? Exploring the co-development of self-representation and positive social behavior

S3.iv:   Milica Nikolic, University of Amsterdam

Implicit self-recognition in infancy predicts self-conscious emotional reactivity in childhood

 

S.4 Early markers for neurodevelopmental disorders: Towards the identification of trajectories to atypical cognitive outcomes

Chairs: Viola Macchi Cassia, University of Milano-Bicocca & Chiara Cantiani, Scientific Institute, IRCCS Medea

S4.i:   Valeria Costanzo, IRCCS Stella Maris Foundation

Social and non-social early markers of ASD: The relationship between disengagement of attention and joint attention in high-risk siblings at 12 months of life

S4.ii:   Valentina Riva, Scientific Institute, IRCCS Medea

Atypical ERP responses to multisensory integration in infants at risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder

S4.iii:   Roberta Bettoni, University of Milano-Bicocca

Visual implicit learning abilities in infants at familial risk for Development Language Disorder

S4.iv:   Gaia Scherif, Oxford University

Understanding variable outcomes in genetic syndromes: The importance of early developmental phenotyping

S4 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.5 The rhythm of our heart and mind: Neurophysiological responses to communicative rhythms in parent-infant interactions

Chair: Trinh Nguyen, University of Vienna

S5.i:   Trinh Nguyen, University of Vienna

The role of physiological synchrony for attachment

S5.ii:   Christina Schätz, University of Vienna

Effects of maternal infant-directed singing on infant physiological arousal

S5.iii:   Ira Marriott Haresign, The University of East London

Mutual gaze leads to phase reorganization and concomitant short-term increases in interpersonal neural synchrony

S5.iv: Shir Atzil, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Discussion

S5 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

08:30-13:00  Poster Session 1 (available on demand)


10:15-10:30  Welcoming remarks with ICIS President Lisa Oakes


10:30-11:30 Live Symposium Sessions

Invited Session: Solutions for studying development in clinical settings (60 minutes with live Q&A)

Bridgette Kelleher, Purdue University

Evelyne Mercure, Goldsmiths, University of London

Susan Rivera, University of California Davis (moderator)

 

Webinar: How to have effective collaborations: Advice from the Manybabies team live webinar (60 minutes)

Christina Bergmann, Max Planck Institute

Kiley Hamlin, University of British Columbia

Krista Byers-Heinlein, Concordia University

Casey Lew-Williams, Princeton (moderator)


 

11:30-13:00  Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.6  Timing is everything: The temporal dynamics of labeling in typical and atypical language development

Chair: Jill Lany, University of Liverpool

S6.i:   Jill Lany, University of Liverpool

The temporal dynamics of labeling shape object recognition

S6.ii:   Michael Goldstein, Cornell University

Relative contributions of infant-directed speech and motion when learning new words

S6.iii:   Madhavilatha Maganti, Ashoka University

Maternal synchronous gesture adaptations during object naming to term and preterm infants: A longitudinal study

S6.iv:   Chi-hsin Chen, The Ohio State University

Children’s hearing loss affects the synchrony between parents’ object naming and children’s attention to objects in parent-child interactions

 

S.7  Individual differences in attentional control and executive functions in the first two years of life

Chair: Alexandra Hendry, University of Oxford

S7.i:   Maria Rosario Rueda, University of Granada

Early development of the executive attention network in infancy

S7.ii:   Martha Ann Bell, Virginia Tech

Monthly development of cognitive and attention inhibition in the first year

S7.iii:   Alexandra Hendry, University of Oxford

Inhibitory control at 10 and 16 months on the A-not-B task and the Early Childhood Inhibitory Touchscreen Task

S7 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.8 Parent and child contributions to emotion regulation: Beyond main effects to complex developmental pathways

Chair: Kaya de Barbaro, University of Texas at Austin

S8.i:   Lauren Bailes, University of North Carolina Greensboro

Mother and infant contributions to infant negative emotionality over time

S8.ii:   Kaya de Barbaro, University of Texas at Austin

Mama tried: Contingent responding to distress does not increase rate of real-time soothing in infants high in negative emotionality

S8.iii:   Niyantri Ravindran, The Pennsylvania State University

Parental structuring of toddler negative emotion predicts children’s use of distraction longitudinally

S8.iv: Maria Gartstein, Washington State University (Discussant)

S8 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.9  The role of action understanding in early sociomoral cognition

Chair: Brandon Woo, Harvard University

S9.i  Denis Tatone, Central European University

Twelve-month-old infants use payoff information to disambiguate the goals of agents involved in a joint activity

S9.ii:   Fransisca Ting, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

16-month-old infants perceive irrational individuals as having reduced moral rights

S9.iii:   Brandon Woo, Harvard University

Social cognition in context: Infants’ evaluations of helping in means-end sequences

S9.iv:   Elizabeth Enright, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Toddlers consider others’ goals when helping others

S.9 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.10  The I in team: Individual differences in infancy shape social competence and prosociality

Chair: Jess Aitken, University of Auckland

S10.i:   Robert Hepach, Leipzig University

Children’s positive emotions following helping others and seeing others being helped: Evidence for a developmental shift

S10.ii :   Jess Aitken, University of Auckland

Temperament and cooperative ability in infancy: Are effects of temperament mediated through children’s social behaviour during cooperative tasks?

S10.iii:   Amanda Brandone, Lehigh University

Developmental pathways from infant social cognition to later prosocial behavior and theory of mind

S10.iv:   Moritz Köster, Freie Universität Berlin

A developmental systems approach to early helping behavior

S.10 Q&A: Robert Hepach, Amanda Brandone & Moritz Köster will be available for questions during Congress Proceedings 1 (BST), with Amanda Brandone and Jess Aitken available for questions during both Congress Proceedings 1 (BST) and 2 (PDT)

 

13:00-14:00  End of Conference Proceedings 1 – Coffee / Cocktail hour

Day 2: July 7

07:00-08:30  Poster Session 2


 

08:30-10:00 Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.11  The origins of causal thought

Chair: Jonathan Kominsky, Rutgers University – Newark

S11.i:   Deon Benton, Brown University

Stop in the name of contact: How infants learn about the causal properties of people and objects

S11.ii:   Samantha Wood, Indiana University

Reverse engineering the origins of causal knowledge

S11.iii:   Katarina Begus, Rutgers University – Newark

Not all information is created equal: Investigating infants’ sensitivity to confounded information in a causal reasoning task

S11.iv:   Jonathan Kominsky, Rutgers University – Newark

Disconnected causal representations in the first year of life

S11 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

S.12 The structure and function of biobehavioral synchrony in early development

Chair: Bennett Bertenthal, Indiana University

S12.i:   Elizabeth daSilva, Indiana University-Purdue University Columbus

Infant-mother physiological synchrony moderates infants’ self-regulation

S12.ii:   Stefanie Höhl, University of Vienna

Tuned in: Neural synchrony in mother-infant dyads

S12.iii:   Elise Piazza, Princeton University

Neural synchrony predicts novel word learning from storybooks

S12.iv:   Megan Whitehorn, UEL

Parental frontal brain activity tracks infant attention during shared play

S12 Q&A: live questions taking place during both Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) and 2 (PDT) 

 

S.13 Rhythm perception in infants: Neural, pupillary, and motor entrainment to speech

Chair: Judit Gervain, Université Paris Descartes

S13.i:   Tineke M. Snijders, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

Tracking speech rhythm in the 7.5 month old infant brain is related to word segmentation performance at 9 months

S13.ii:   Áine Ní Choisdealbha, University of Cambridge

Changes in neural rhythmic entrainment during the first year of life

S13.iii:   Alan Langus, University of Potsdam

Individual variability in pupillary entrainment predicts speech segmentation with prosodic and statistical cues in infancy

S13.iv:   Natalie Boll-Avetisyan, University of Potsdam

Infants show spontaneous motor entrainment while listening to rhythmic speech

 

S.14 Understanding infants’ lives by the use of smartphones: Experience sampling and ambulatory assessment

Chair: Stephanie Wermelinger, University of Zurich

S14.i:   Sophie von Stumm, University of York

Using digital technologies for assessing infants’ cognitive development in real-time

S14.ii:   Nivedita Mani, University of Goettingen

Online testing technology for infant touchscreen and looking time tasks

S14.iii:   Stephanie Wermelinger, University of Zurich

Identifiying dynamic developmental processes during infancy by using the WeltentdeckerApp

S14 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

08:30-13:15  Poster Session 2 (available on demand)


 

10:00-11:30  Live Symposium Sessions

Invited Session: Secondary Data analysis of existing data files (90 minutes with live Q&A)

Michael Thomas, Birkbeck, University of London

Alex Cristia, CNRS

Marije Verhage, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam

Sarah Jensen, Boston College (moderator)

 

Invited Session: Online solutions for data collection (90 minutes minutes with live Q&A)

Rhodri Cusack, Trinity College Dublin

Emily Jones & Elena Throm, Birkbeck, University of London

Caspar Addyman, Goldsmiths, University of London

Natasha Kirkham, Birkbeck, University of London (moderator)


 

11:45-13:15  Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.15  Brain & Behavior: New insights into neural correlates of infant emotion regulation

Chair: Courtney Filippi, University of Maryland

S15.i:   Elina Thomas, Oregon Health and Science University

Newborn amygdala connectivity to prefrontal and sensory regions is associated with early emerging regulatory behavior

S15.ii:   Courtney Filippi, University of Maryland

Associations between amygdala connectivity and negative reactive temperament

S15.iii:   Chad Sylvester, Washington University

Maternal Anxiety and Neonatal Brain Response to Novel Sounds as Assessed with fMRI

S15 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.16  Insights from outside the lab: Modeling observational data to understand language learning

Chair: Mika Braginsky, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

S16.i:   Eva Portelance, Stanford University

Using neural network language models to predict age of acquisition for early vocabulary

S16.ii:   Stephan Meylan, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Characterizing child-directed listening with corpus and model-based analyses

S16.iii:   Mika Braginsky, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Characterizing the relationship between lexical and morphological development

S16.iv:   Georgia Loukatou, CNRS, PSL University

Assessing cross-linguistic viability of infant word segmentation models

S.16 Q&A: Georia Loukatou will be available for questions during Congress Proceedings 1 (BST), with Eva Portelance, Stephan Meylan & Mika Braginsky available for questions during both Congress Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.17 How multiple exemplars help infants and young children extend their knowledge

Chair: Jane Childers, Trinity University

S17.i:   Susan Graham, University of Calgary

Multiple exemplars facilitate 9-month-olds’ property generalizations

S17.ii:   Jane Childers, Trinity University

Extending verbs to new events: Does the comparison of events over delays help?

S17.iii:   Christina Schonberg, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Why do multiple examples help children learn words? The roles of aggregation, decontextualization, and memory dynamics

S17.iv:  Scott Johnson, University of California, Los Angeles

Discussant

S.17 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

S.18  Child evocative effects in the context of parenting across developmental systems: A behavioral and neurophysiological perspective

Chair: Diane Lickenbrock, Western Kentucky University

S18.i:   Kayla Brown, The Pennsylvania State University

Difficult temperament profiles and externalizing behaviors: The moderating effects on harsh parenting and dyadic inconsistency

S18.ii:   Berenice Anaya, Penn State University

Maternal anxiety and infant negative affect trajectories: The role of neural and environmental factors during infancy

S18.iii:   Diane Lickenbrock, Western Kentucky University

Infant physiological regulation with mothers and fathers: The effects of infant temperament and parent factors

S18 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.19  Fair’s fair?: Intentions and relationships impact infants’ expectations about fairness and preferences for fair individuals

Chair: Zoe Liberman, University of California Santa Barbara

S19.i:   Luca Surian, University of Trento

Preverbal infants’ intention-based evaluations of fairness

S19.ii:   Anna-Elisabeth Baumann, University of Chicago

Infants’ reactions to resource distribution outcomes as a function of ingroup/outgroup manipulations and language status

S19.iii:   Lin Bian, Cornell University

Do 4-month-olds take into account group membership when judging fair outcomes?

S19.iv:   Zoe Liberman, University of California Santa Barbara

Infants predict that distributors will act partially towards their friends

S.19 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

13:15-14:00  End of Conference Proceedings 1 – Coffee / Cocktail hour

Day 3: July 8

07:00-08:30  Poster Session 3


 

08:30-10:00  Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.20  Enhancing our understanding of social cognition in infancy through cutting-edge technology and individualized approaches

Chair: Giorgia Bussu, Radboud University Medical Center

S20.i:   Maheen Siddiqui, Birkbeck, University of London

Spatially resolved measures of cytochrome-c-oxidase during functional activation in infants

S20.ii:   David López Pérez, Institute of Psychology, Polish Academy of Sciences

Efficiency of scanning in infancy in the presence and absence of faces differentially predicts expressive and receptive language in toddlers

S20.iii:   Giorgia Bussu, Radboud University Medical Center

An individual approach to understand the nature of face processing in early autism

S20.iv:   Anna Gui, Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development, Birkbeck College, University of London

Neuroadaptive optimization to study how neural signatures of attention to faces in infants relate to later autism

S.20 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.21 Not just the linguistic factor! Associations between maternal child-directed speech and cognitive and socio-emotional competencies

Chair: Maria Spinelli, University G. D’Annunzio Chieti-Pescara

Discussant: Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, Temple University

S21.i:   Prachi Shah, University of Michigan

Parent language stimulation, parent sensitivity and socioeconomic status: Associations with curiosity

S21.ii:   Chiara Suttora, University of Bologna

The role of maternal verbal input in the emergence of mental lexicon in early childhood

S21.iii:   Maria Spinelli, University G. D’Annunzio Chieti-Pescara

Talk to me mum! The longitudinal effects of prosodic and linguistic characteristics of infant directed speech on the development of child attention and emotion regulation

S21.iv:   Brianna McMillan, Temple University

Fluid, back-and-forth conversation sets a foundation for infant executive function skills

S.21 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

S.22 Tips, tricks, and statistics: Recommendations for improving infant research methods

Chair: Lena V. Kremin, Concordia University

S22.i:   Esther Schott, Concordia University

Tools for transparency: Practical tips for sharing your research

S22.ii:   Lena V. Kremin, Concordia University

Let the data do the talking: Optimizing visualizations for transparency and readability

S22.iii:   Nivedita Mani, University of Goettingen

Bayesian sequential testing in developmental research

S22.iv:   Alejandrina Cristia, ENS, EHESS, CNRS, PSL University

Using long-form recordings to study infants’ speech input and outcomes: Opportunities and challenges

S22 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.23 Building contingency: How caregiver and child characteristics relate to interactions that support infant language

Chair: Lillian Masek, Temple University

S23.i:   Rebecca Alper, Temple University

One is not enough: Understanding variability in early language interaction quality using parent self-efficacy and developmental knowledge profiles

S23.ii:   Lillian Masek, Temple University

Building fluid and connected conversation: How caregiver speech differentially relates to interaction quality

S23.iii:   Rufan Luo, Rutgers University, Camden

Maternal question use and child language outcomes: The moderating role of SES and children’s concurrent vocabulary

S.23 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

08:30-13:00  Poster Session 3 (available on demand)


 

10:00-11:15 Live Symposium Sessions

Invited Session: Modeling development from existing data (75 minutes with Q&A)

Gert Westermann, Lancaster University

Jochen Triesch, Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies

Katherine Twomey, University of Manchester (moderator)

Live Webinar: Data Repositories: Resources for studying development (75 minutes)

Karen Adolph, New York University

Marisa Casillas, Max Planck Institute

Brian MacWhinney, Carnegie Mellon University

Caitlin Fausey, University of Oregon (moderator)


 

11:30-13:00  Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.24  Novel technologies to assess language development in infants

Chair: Julien Mayor, University of Oslo

S24.i:   Virginia Marchman, Stanford University

Using web-based platforms to expand the socioeconomic reach of parent report measures of vocabulary development

S24.ii:   Julien Mayor, University of Oslo

BabyLex-IRT: Estimating early vocabulary sizes using a Bayesian-inspired item-response theory approach

S24.iii:   Camila Scaff, University of Zurich

Socio-economic status and word comprehension in early childhood: A study in a low inequality setting and a meta-analytic review

S24.iv:   Amanda Seidl, Purdue University

The development of canonical babble in a crosslinguistic and cross-cultural corpus

S24 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.25: Embracing new technologies to quantify early learning environments

Chair: Sara Schroer, Indiana University

S25.i:   Sara Schroer, Indiana University

Hands-on learning: Toddler’s multimodal attention at naming moments leads to successful word learning

S25.ii:   George Kachergis, Stanford University

Automatically detecting children’s visual access to social information in egocentric videos

S25.iii:   Marisa Casillas, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

The linguistic landscapes of learning in two small-scale societies

S25.iv:   Mira Nencheva, Princeton University

Analyzing emotion in language input: Caregivers’ cues to valence support toddlers’ learning of emotion words

S.25 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) and Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.26 Updates from the ManyBabies Consortium: Four collaborative replications of important findings in infancy research

Chair: Michael Frank, Stanford University

S26.i:   Angeline Sin Mei Tsui, Stanford University

ManyBabies 1B: Testing bilinguals’ preference for infant-directed speech

S26.ii:   Dora Kampis, University of Copenhagen

ManyBabies 2: Theory of mind in infancy

S26.iii:   Ingmar Visser, University of Amsterdam

ManyBabies 3: Infant rule learning: a multi-lab replication study

S26.iv:   Kelsey Lucca, Arizona State University

ManyBabies 4: A large-scale, multi-lab, coordinated replication study of infants’ social evaluations

S26 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.27  Real-world interactions in Real Time: Moment-to-moment dynamics of parent-infant joint engagement in naturalistic contexts

Chair: Catalina Suarez-Rivera, New York University

S27.i:   Chen Yu, Indiana University

Multiple sensorimotor pathways to parent-infant coordinated attention in naturalistic toy play

S27.ii:   Betina Karshaleva, University of California, San Diego

Infant vocalizations and maternal speech in naturalistic play: Contingencies from 4 to 12 months

S27.iii:   Catalina Suarez-Rivera, New York University

Everyday joint engagement: Coupling of the mothers body with the infants manual actions

S27.iv:   Jacob Schatz, New York University

Playing and learning together: Spontaneous joint engagement scaffolds infant play at home

S27 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.28  Exploring the circumstances in which infants attribute dispositions to agents

Chair: Megan Pronovost, California State University, Fresno

S28.i:   You-jung Choi, Harvard University

Three-month-old infants’ understanding of a human agent’s preference

S28.ii:   Su-hua Wang, University of California, Santa Cruz

Self-experience scaffolds infants’ reasoning about preference

S28.iii:   Lin Bian, Cornell University

8-month-olds attribute, and expect others to attribute, strong preferences to agents

S28.iv:   Megan Pronovost, California State University, Fresno

20-month-old infants’ attribution of behavioral dispositions to agents

S.28 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

13:00-14:00  End of Conference Proceedings 1 – Coffee / Cocktail hour

Day 4: July 9

07:00-08:30  Poster Session 4


 

08:30-10:00  Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.29  Integrating computational and neuroimaging methods to investigate infant cognitive development

Chair: Laurie Bayet, American University

S29.i:   Benjamin Zinszer, Princeton University

Decoding representations of familiar objects in young infants using fNIRS

S29.ii:   Laurie Bayet, American University

Time-course and properties of higher-order visual representations in the infant brain

S29.iii:   Rhodri Cusack, Trinity College Dublin

Deep neural networks as a model of learning during the helpless period of infancy

S29.iv:   Nicholas Turk-Browne, Yale University

Adult-grade cognitive neuroscience in infants

S29 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.30 The reciprocal roles of parents and children in organizing learning opportunities in dyadic interaction

Chair: Steven Elmlinger, Cornell University

Discussant: Michael Goldstein, Cornell University

S30.i:   Miriam Langeloh, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences

Are you like me? Contingent adult-infant interactions in a naturalistic dual-EEG paradigm

S30.ii:   Steven Elmlinger, Cornell University

The development of prelinguistic vocal sequences: implications for early communication and language

S30.iii:   Sara Schroer, Indiana University

Toddler vocalizations shape the structure of parent-child interactions

S30.iv:   Katharina Rohlfing, Paderborn University

Do maternal vocalizations scaffold children to take up an active role in peekaboo routine?

S.30 Q&A:  All presenters available to take questions during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST). Steven Elmlinger, Sara Schroer, and Katharina Rolfing are available during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT). Discussant: Michael Goldstein is available for both Q&A sessions

 

S.31 Fine-grained environmental data illuminate the process of language learning

Chair: Daniel Swingley, University of Pennsylvania

S31.i  Daniel Swingley, University of Pennsylvania

How learning word-forms could guide infants to phonetic categories: New evidence from English

S31.ii:   Catherine Tamis-LeMonda, New York University

The food for thought: Unpacking the everyday language experiences of infants

S31.iii:   Chen Yu, Indiana University

Rethinking input: The infant’s view challenges the problem of referential uncertainty in early word learning

S31.iv:   Emmanuel Dupoux, EHESS

Reverse engineering early language acquisition: Can machine learning help?

S31 Q&A: live questions taking place with all speakers during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST), with some speakers being available during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.32 What can video coding tell us about infant development? Methodological examples and new results from two preterm infant cohorts

Chair: Sue Fletcher-Watson, University of Edinburgh

S32.i:   Bethan Dean, University of Edinburgh

Longitudinal assessment of social cognition in infants born preterm using eye-tracking and parent-child play

S32.ii:   Sinead O’Carroll, University of Edinburgh

Frequency and type of parental gesture during parent-child play is influenced by socioeconomic status and gestational age at birth

S32.iii:   Lorna Ginnell, University of Edinburgh

Reduced emotional response to the still-face paradigm in preterm infants

S.32 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.33 Parent-infant interaction styles in diverse populations and their impact on infant development

Chair: Sarah Lloyd-Fox, Cambridge University

S33.i:   Bosiljka Milosavljevic, Birkbeck, University of London

Mother-infant interactions, maternal mental health and infant cognitive outcomes in The Gambia

S33.ii:   Ciara Kelly, University of Sheffield

The communication of deaf infants with hearing parents

S33.iii:   Evelyne Mercure, Goldsmiths, University of London

Deaf mothers and their hearing infants: Social interaction, maternal sensitivity and language development

S33.iv:   Atsushi Senju, Birkbeck, University of London

Development of social attention and communication in infants of blind parents

S.33 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

08:30-13:00  Poster Session 4 (available on demand)


 

10:00-11:30 Live Symposium Sessions

 

Invited Session: Solutions for studying early language development (90 minutes with live Q&A)

Katie Alcock, Lancaster University

Mike Frank, Stanford

Elizabeth Norton, Northwestern

Jessica Horst, University of Sussex (moderator)

Webinar: Stress and Development live webinar (75 minutes)

Marion van den Heuvel, Tilburg University

Dima Amso, Brown University

Natasha Kirkham, Birkbeck, University of London

Brittney Chere, Birkbeck, University of London (moderator)


 

11:30-13:00  Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.34  Parent-infant interactions and language development in infants with communication disorders

Chair: Yuanyuan Wang, Ohio State University

S34.i :   Yuanyuan Wang, Ohio State University

The effects of hearing loss on the social feedback loop in infants with cochlear implants

S34.ii:   Girija Kadlaskar, Purdue University

Caregiver touch-speech communication and infant responses in 12-month-olds at high risk for autism spectrum disorder

S34.iii:   John Bunce, California State University East Bay

Why do I keep repeating myself? Exploring how parental assumptions of children’s comprehension effects word repetition patterns

S34.iv:   Derek Houston, The Ohio State University

Parent-infant interactions and word-learning skills in deaf infants with cochlear implants

S34 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.35  Novel approaches to electroencephalogram (EEG) lateralization: Beyond traditional asymmetry

Chair: Maria Gartstein, Washington State University

S35.i:   Maria Gartstein, Washington State University

EEG frontal asymmetry changes during emotion-eliciting tasks and parent-child interaction dynamics

S35.ii:   Ross Vanderwert, Cardiff University

Individual differences in frontal asymmetry while viewing emotion faces: A capability model approach

S35.iii:   Martha Ann Bell, Virginia Tech

Predictors of level of negative affect after arm restraint at 5 months

S35.iv:   Nancy Jones, Florida Atlantic University

Infant neurophysiological patterns and temperament are linked to maternal depressive symptoms

S.35 Q&A:  Ross Vanderwert will be available for questions during Congress Proceedings 1 (BST), with Maria Gartstein, Martha Ann Bell and Nancy Jones available for questions during Congress Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.36 Learning ‘hard words’: The role of conceptual representations when the tough gets tougher

Chair: Laura Lakusta, Montclair State University

S36.i:   Nicolò Cesana Arlotti, Johns Hopkins University

An investigation of the origins of logical quantification: Infant’s (and adult’s) representations of exhaustivity in collective or individual complex actions

S36.ii:   Ariel Starr, University of Washington

Spatial metaphor facilitates word learning

S36.iii:   Laura Lakusta, Montclair State University

Getting support for ‘support’: The privileging of ‘Support-From-Below’ in early spatial language acquisition

S.36 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

S.37 Cultural differences in mind-mindedness and infant-mother interaction

Chair: Elizabeth Meins, University of York

S37.i:   Catherine McMahon, Macquarie University

Cross-cultural comparison of maternal mind-mindedness among Australian and Chinese mothers of toddlers

S37.ii:   Yujin Lee, University of York

How does culture and empathy relate to mothers’ mind-mindedness?

S37.iii:  Nao Fujita, University of Cambridge

A cross-cultural comparison of maternal mind-mindedness and speech characteristics between Japan and the UK

S37.iv:   Katie Slocombe, University of York

Cross-cultural differences in mother-infant play behaviour

S.37 Q&A:  Katie Slocombe, Nao Fujita and Yujin Lee will be available for questions during Congress Proceedings 1 (BST), with Cathy McMahon being available for questions during Congress Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.38  Better safe than sorry: Infants’ use of social information to reason and learn about threat

Chair: Shari Liu, Harvard University

S38.i:   Shari Liu, Harvard University

Dangerous ground: Thirteen-month-old infants are sensitive to peril in other people’s actions

S38.ii:   Camille Rioux, Max Planck Institute for Human Development

Social information reduces infants’ avoidance of plants

S38.iii:   Tobias Grossmann, University of Virginia

Friend or foe? Impression formation in the human infant brain

S38.iv:   Zoe Liberman, University of California Santa Barbara

Not all negative emotions are equal: Infants selectively attend to threat

S.38 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

13:00-14:00  End of Conference Proceedings 1 – Coffee / Cocktail hour

*Sessions available on demand next day

Day 1: July 6

04:00-05:30  Poster Session 1


 

05:30-07:00  Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.1  Early language across-cultures: Input, language processes and outcome measures

Chair: Laia Fibla, University of East Anglia

S1.i:   Marisa Casillas, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

Day-wide patterns in the use of child-directed speech in two non-Western, subsistence farming communities

S1.ii:   Camila Scaff,  University of Zurich

Exploring conversational turns and partners among Tsimane forager-horticulturalists

S1.iii:   Alejandrina Cristia, CNRS, PSL University

Spontaneous vocalizations from birth to age four: Insights from a mega-analysis of 13,785 hours of audio

S1.iv:   Laia Fibla, University of East Anglia

Early language processing and language exposure across-cultures: UK and India

S1 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) with some speakers being available during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.2 Environmental influences on infant attention: A global perspective

Chair: Sarah Lloyd-Fox, University of Cambridge

S2.i:   Samantha McCann, King’s College London

Undernutrition in infancy impacts early brain development in The Gambia: An fNIRS study

S2.ii:   Annie Brandes-Aitken, New York University

Contributions of cumulative parent cortisol to the neural underpinnings of infant attention and emotion regulation

S2.iii:   Sam Wass, University of East London

Physiological stress, sustained attention and cognitive engagement in 12-month-old infants from urban environments

S2 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.3 Investigating the relationship between representing the self and the other in early development

Chair: Victoria Southgate, University of Copenhagen

S3.i:   Chiara Bulgarelli, University College London

The role of self-awareness in selective facial mimicry of native over foreign speakers

S3.ii:   Dora Kampis, University of Copenhagen

The mapping of others to oneself in 16-26-old infants

S3.iii:   Josephine Ross, University of Dundee

Autocentric or allocentric? Exploring the co-development of self-representation and positive social behavior

S3.iv:   Milica Nikolic, University of Amsterdam

Implicit self-recognition in infancy predicts self-conscious emotional reactivity in childhood

 

S.4 Early markers for neurodevelopmental disorders: Towards the identification of trajectories to atypical cognitive outcomes

Chairs: Viola Macchi Cassia, University of Milano-Bicocca & Chiara Cantiani, Scientific Institute, IRCCS Medea

S4.i:   Valeria Costanzo, IRCCS Stella Maris Foundation

Social and non-social early markers of ASD: The relationship between disengagement of attention and joint attention in high-risk siblings at 12 months of life

S4.ii:   Valentina Riva, Scientific Institute, IRCCS Medea

Atypical ERP responses to multisensory integration in infants at risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder

S4.iii:   Roberta Bettoni, University of Milano-Bicocca

Visual implicit learning abilities in infants at familial risk for Development Language Disorder

S4.iv:   Gaia Scherif, Oxford University

Understanding variable outcomes in genetic syndromes: The importance of early developmental phenotyping

S4 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.5 The rhythm of our heart and mind: Neurophysiological responses to communicative rhythms in parent-infant interactions

Chair: Trinh Nguyen, University of Vienna

S5.i:   Trinh Nguyen, University of Vienna

The role of physiological synchrony for attachment

S5.ii:   Christina Schätz, University of Vienna

Effects of maternal infant-directed singing on infant physiological arousal

S5.iii:   Ira Marriott Haresign, The University of East London

Mutual gaze leads to phase reorganization and concomitant short-term increases in interpersonal neural synchrony

S5.iv: Shir Atzil, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

S5 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only


05:30-10:00  Poster Session 1 (available on demand)


07:15-07:30  Welcoming remarks with ICIS President Lisa Oakes


07:30-08:30 Live Symposium Sessions

Invited Session: Solutions for studying development in clinical settings (60 minutes with live Q&A)

Bridgette Kelleher, Purdue University

Evelyne Mercure, Goldsmiths, University of London

Susan Rivera, University of California Davis (moderator)

 

Webinar: How to have effective collaborations: Advice from the Manybabies teams live webinar (60 minutes)

Christina Bergmann, Max Planck Institute

Kiley Hamlin, University of British Columbia

Krista Byers-Heinlein, Concordia University

Casey Lew-Williams, Princeton (moderator)


 

08:30-10:00  Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.6  Timing is everything: The temporal dynamics of labeling in typical and atypical language development

Chair: Jill Lany, University of Liverpool

S6.i:   Jill Lany, University of Liverpool

The temporal dynamics of labeling shape object recognition

S6.ii:   Michael Goldstein, Cornell University

Relative contributions of infant-directed speech and motion when learning new words

S6.iii:   Madhavilatha Maganti, Ashoka University

Maternal synchronous gesture adaptations during object naming to term and preterm infants: A longitudinal study

S6.iv:   Chi-hsin Chen, The Ohio State University

Children’s hearing loss affects the synchrony between parents’ object naming and children’s attention to objects in parent-child interactions

 

S.7  Individual differences in attentional control and executive functions in the first two years of life

Chair: Alexandra Hendry, University of Oxford

S7.i:   Maria Rosario Rueda, University of Granada

Early development of the executive attention network in infancy

S7.ii:   Martha Ann Bell, Virginia Tech

Monthly development of cognitive and attention inhibition in the first year

S7.iii:   Alexandra Hendry, University of Oxford

Inhibitory control at 10 and 16 months on the A-not-B task and the Early Childhood Inhibitory Touchscreen Task

S7 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.8 Parent and child contributions to emotion regulation: Beyond main effects to complex developmental pathways

Chair: Kaya de Barbaro, University of Texas at Austin

S8.i:   Lauren Bailes, University of North Carolina Greensboro

Mother and infant contributions to infant negative emotionality over time

S8.ii:   Kaya de Barbaro, University of Texas at Austin

Mama tried: Contingent responding to distress does not increase rate of real-time soothing in infants high in negative emotionality

S8.iii:   Niyantri Ravindran, The Pennsylvania State University

Parental structuring of toddler negative emotion predicts children’s use of distraction longitudinally

S8.iv: Maria Gartstein, Washington State University (Discussant)

S8 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.9  The role of action understanding in early sociomoral cognition

Chair: Brandon Woo, Harvard University

S9.i  Denis Tatone, Central European University

Twelve-month-old infants use payoff information to disambiguate the goals of agents involved in a joint activity

S9.ii:   Fransisca Ting, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

16-month-old infants perceive irrational individuals as having reduced moral rights

S9.iii:   Brandon Woo, Harvard University

Social cognition in context: Infants’ evaluations of helping in means-end sequences

S9.iv:   Elizabeth Enright, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Toddlers consider others’ goals when helping others

S.9 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.10  The I in team: Individual differences in infancy shape social competence and prosociality

Chair: Jess Aitken, University of Auckland

S10.i:   Robert Hepach, Leipzig University

Children’s positive emotions following helping others and seeing others being helped: Evidence for a developmental shift

S10.ii :   Jess Aitken, University of Auckland

Temperament and cooperative ability in infancy: Are effects of temperament mediated through children’s social behaviour during cooperative tasks?

S10.iii:   Amanda Brandone, Lehigh University

Developmental pathways from infant social cognition to later prosocial behavior and theory of mind

S10.iv:   Moritz Köster, Freie Universität Berlin

A developmental systems approach to early helping behavior

S.10 Q&A: Robert Hepach, Amanda Brandone & Moritz Köster will be available for questions during Congress Proceedings 1 (BST), with Amanda Brandone and Jess Aitken available for questions during both Congress Proceedings 1 (BST) and 2 (PDT)

 

10:00-11:00  End of Conference Proceedings 1 – Coffee / Cocktail hour

Day 2: July 7

04:00-05:30  Poster Session 2


 

05:30-07:00 Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.11  The origins of causal thought

Chair: Jonathan Kominsky, Rutgers University – Newark

S11.i:   Deon Benton, Brown University

Stop in the name of contact: How infants learn about the causal properties of people and objects

S11.ii:   Samantha Wood, Indiana University

Reverse engineering the origins of causal knowledge

S11.iii:   Katarina Begus, Rutgers University – Newark

Not all information is created equal: Investigating infants’ sensitivity to confounded information in a causal reasoning task

S11.iv:   Jonathan Kominsky, Rutgers University – Newark

Disconnected causal representations in the first year of life

S11 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

S.12 The structure and function of biobehavioral synchrony in early development

Chair: Bennett Bertenthal, Indiana University

S12.i:   Elizabeth daSilva, Indiana University-Purdue University Columbus

Infant-mother physiological synchrony moderates infants’ self-regulation

S12.ii:   Stefanie Höhl, University of Vienna

Tuned in: Neural synchrony in mother-infant dyads

S12.iii:   Elise Piazza, Princeton University

Neural synchrony predicts novel word learning from storybooks

S12.iv:   Megan Whitehorn, UEL

Parental frontal brain activity tracks infant attention during shared play

S12 Q&A: live questions taking place during both Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) and 2 (PDT) 

 

S.13 Rhythm perception in infants: Neural, pupillary, and motor entrainment to speech

Chair: Judit Gervain, Université Paris Descartes

S13.i:   Tineke M. Snijders, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

Tracking speech rhythm in the 7.5 month old infant brain is related to word segmentation performance at 9 months

S13.ii:   Áine Ní Choisdealbha, University of Cambridge

Changes in neural rhythmic entrainment during the first year of life

S13.iii:   Alan Langus, University of Potsdam

Individual variability in pupillary entrainment predicts speech segmentation with prosodic and statistical cues in infancy

S13.iv:   Natalie Boll-Avetisyan, University of Potsdam

Infants show spontaneous motor entrainment while listening to rhythmic speech

 

S.14 Understanding infants’ lives by the use of smartphones: Experience sampling and ambulatory assessment

Chair: Stephanie Wermelinger, University of Zurich

S14.i:   Sophie von Stumm, University of York

Using digital technologies for assessing infants’ cognitive development in real-time

S14.ii:   Nivedita Mani, University of Goettingen

Online testing technology for infant touchscreen and looking time tasks

S14.iii:   Stephanie Wermelinger, University of Zurich

Identifiying dynamic developmental processes during infancy by using the WeltentdeckerApp

S14 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

05:30-10:15  Poster Session 2 (available on demand)


 

07:00-08:30  Live Symposium Sessions

Invited Session: Secondary Data analysis of existing data files (90 minutes with live Q&A)

Michael Thomas, Birkbeck, University of London

Alex Cristia, CNRS

Marije Verhage, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam

Sarah Jensen, Boston College (moderator)

 

Invited Session: Online solutions for data collection (90 minutes minutes with live Q&A)

Rhodri Cusack, Trinity College Dublin

Emily Jones & Elena Throm, Birkbeck, University of London

Caspar Addyman, Goldsmiths, University of London

Natasha Kirkham, Birkbeck, University of London (moderator)


 

08:45-10:15  Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.15  Brain & Behavior: New insights into neural correlates of infant emotion regulation

Chair: Courtney Filippi, University of Maryland

S15.i:   Elina Thomas, Oregon Health and Science University

Newborn amygdala connectivity to prefrontal and sensory regions is associated with early emerging regulatory behavior

S15.ii:   Courtney Filippi, University of Maryland

Associations between amygdala connectivity and negative reactive temperament

S15.iii:   Chad Sylvester, Washington University

Maternal Anxiety and Neonatal Brain Response to Novel Sounds as Assessed with fMRI

S15 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.16  Insights from outside the lab: Modeling observational data to understand language learning

Chair: Mika Braginsky, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

S16.i:   Eva Portelance, Stanford University

Using neural network language models to predict age of acquisition for early vocabulary

S16.ii:   Stephan Meylan, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Characterizing child-directed listening with corpus and model-based analyses

S16.iii:   Mika Braginsky, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Characterizing the relationship between lexical and morphological development

S16.iv:   Georgia Loukatou, CNRS, PSL University

Assessing cross-linguistic viability of infant word segmentation models

S.16 Q&A: Georia Loukatou will be available for questions during Congress Proceedings 1 (BST), with Eva Portelance, Stephan Meylan & Mika Braginsky available for questions during both Congress Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.17 How multiple exemplars help infants and young children extend their knowledge

Chair: Jane Childers, Trinity University

S17.i:   Susan Graham, University of Calgary

Multiple exemplars facilitate 9-month-olds’ property generalizations

S17.ii:   Jane Childers, Trinity University

Extending verbs to new events: Does the comparison of events over delays help?

S17.iii:   Christina Schonberg, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Why do multiple examples help children learn words? The roles of aggregation, decontextualization, and memory dynamics

S17.iv:  Scott Johnson, University of California, Los Angeles

Discussant

S.17 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

S.18  Child evocative effects in the context of parenting across developmental systems: A behavioral and neurophysiological perspective

Chair: Diane Lickenbrock, Western Kentucky University

S18.i:   Kayla Brown, The Pennsylvania State University

Difficult temperament profiles and externalizing behaviors: The moderating effects on harsh parenting and dyadic inconsistency

S18.ii:   Berenice Anaya, Penn State University

Maternal anxiety and infant negative affect trajectories: The role of neural and environmental factors during infancy

S18.iii:   Diane Lickenbrock, Western Kentucky University

Infant physiological regulation with mothers and fathers: The effects of infant temperament and parent factors

S18 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.19  Fair’s fair?: Intentions and relationships impact infants’ expectations about fairness and preferences for fair individuals

Chair: Zoe Liberman, University of California Santa Barbara

S19.i:   Luca Surian, University of Trento

Preverbal infants’ intention-based evaluations of fairness

S19.ii:   Anna-Elisabeth Baumann, University of Chicago

Infants’ reactions to resource distribution outcomes as a function of ingroup/outgroup manipulations and language status

S19.iii:   Lin Bian, Cornell University

Do 4-month-olds take into account group membership when judging fair outcomes?

S19.iv:   Zoe Liberman, University of California Santa Barbara

Infants predict that distributors will act partially towards their friends

S.19 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

10:15-11:00  End of Conference Proceedings 1 – Coffee / Cocktail hour

Day 3: July 8

04:00-05:30  Poster Session 3


 

05:30-07:00  Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.20  Enhancing our understanding of social cognition in infancy through cutting-edge technology and individualized approaches

Chair: Giorgia Bussu, Radboud University Medical Center

S20.i:   Maheen Siddiqui, Birkbeck, University of London

Spatially resolved measures of cytochrome-c-oxidase during functional activation in infants

S20.ii:   David López Pérez, Institute of Psychology, Polish Academy of Sciences

Efficiency of scanning in infancy in the presence and absence of faces differentially predicts expressive and receptive language in toddlers

S20.iii:   Giorgia Bussu, Radboud University Medical Center

An individual approach to understand the nature of face processing in early autism

S20.iv:   Anna Gui, Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development, Birkbeck College, University of London

Neuroadaptive optimization to study how neural signatures of attention to faces in infants relate to later autism

S.20 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.21 Not just the linguistic factor! Associations between maternal child-directed speech and cognitive and socio-emotional competencies

Chair: Maria Spinelli, University G. D’Annunzio Chieti-Pescara

Discussant: Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, Temple University

S21.i:   Prachi Shah, University of Michigan

Parent language stimulation, parent sensitivity and socioeconomic status: Associations with curiosity

S21.ii:   Chiara Suttora, University of Bologna

The role of maternal verbal input in the emergence of mental lexicon in early childhood

S21.iii:   Maria Spinelli, University G. D’Annunzio Chieti-Pescara

Talk to me mum! The longitudinal effects of prosodic and linguistic characteristics of infant directed speech on the development of child attention and emotion regulation

S21.iv:   Brianna McMillan, Temple University

Fluid, back-and-forth conversation sets a foundation for infant executive function skills

S.21 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

S.22 Tips, tricks, and statistics: Recommendations for improving infant research methods

Chair: Lena V. Kremin, Concordia University

S22.i:   Esther Schott, Concordia University

Tools for transparency: Practical tips for sharing your research

S22.ii:   Lena V. Kremin, Concordia University

Let the data do the talking: Optimizing visualizations for transparency and readability

S22.iii:   Nivedita Mani, University of Goettingen

Bayesian sequential testing in developmental research

S22.iv:   Alejandrina Cristia, ENS, EHESS, CNRS, PSL University

Using long-form recordings to study infants’ speech input and outcomes: Opportunities and challenges

S22 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.23 Building contingency: How caregiver and child characteristics relate to interactions that support infant language

Chair: Lillian Masek, Temple University

S23.i:   Rebecca Alper, Temple University

One is not enough: Understanding variability in early language interaction quality using parent self-efficacy and developmental knowledge profiles

S23.ii:   Lillian Masek, Temple University

Building fluid and connected conversation: How caregiver speech differentially relates to interaction quality

S23.iii:   Rufan Luo, Rutgers University, Camden

Maternal question use and child language outcomes: The moderating role of SES and children’s concurrent vocabulary

S.23 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

05:30-10:00  Poster Session 3 (available on demand)


 

07:00-08:15 Live Symposium Sessions

Invited Session: Modeling development from existing data (75 minutes with Q&A)

Gert Westermann, Lancaster University

Jochen Triesch, Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies

Katherine Twomey, University of Manchester (moderator)

Live Webinar: Data Repositories: Resources for studying development (75 minutes)

Karen Adolph, New York University

Marisa Casillas, Max Planck Institute

Brian MacWhinney, Carnegie Mellon University

Caitlin Fausey, University of Oregon (moderator)


 

08:30-10:00  Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.24  Novel technologies to assess language development in infants

Chair: Julien Mayor, University of Oslo

S24.i:   Virginia Marchman, Stanford University

Using web-based platforms to expand the socioeconomic reach of parent report measures of vocabulary development

S24.ii:   Julien Mayor, University of Oslo

BabyLex-IRT: Estimating early vocabulary sizes using a Bayesian-inspired item-response theory approach

S24.iii:   Camila Scaff, University of Zurich

Socio-economic status and word comprehension in early childhood: A study in a low inequality setting and a meta-analytic review

S24.iv:   Amanda Seidl, Purdue University

The development of canonical babble in a crosslinguistic and cross-cultural corpus

S24 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.25  Embracing new technologies to quantify early learning environments

Chair: Sara Schroer, Indiana University

S25.i:   Sara Schroer, Indiana University

Hands-on learning: Toddler’s multimodal attention at naming moments leads to successful word learning

S25.ii:   George Kachergis, Stanford University

Automatically detecting children’s visual access to social information in egocentric videos

S25.iii:   Marisa Casillas, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

The linguistic landscapes of learning in two small-scale societies

S25.iv:   Mira Nencheva, Princeton University

Analyzing emotion in language input: Caregivers’ cues to valence support toddlers’ learning of emotion words

S.25 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) and Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.26 Updates from the ManyBabies Consortium: Four collaborative replications of important findings in infancy research

Chair: Michael Frank, Stanford University

S26.i:   Angeline Sin Mei Tsui, Stanford University

ManyBabies 1B: Testing bilinguals’ preference for infant-directed speech

S26.ii:   Dora Kampis, University of Copenhagen

ManyBabies 2: Theory of mind in infancy

S26.iii:   Ingmar Visser, University of Amsterdam

ManyBabies 3: Infant rule learning: a multi-lab replication study

S26.iv:   Kelsey Lucca, Arizona State University

ManyBabies 4: A large-scale, multi-lab, coordinated replication study of infants’ social evaluations

S26 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.27  Real-world interactions in Real Time: Moment-to-moment dynamics of parent-infant joint engagement in naturalistic contexts

Chair: Catalina Suarez-Rivera, New York University

S27.i:   Chen Yu, Indiana University

Multiple sensorimotor pathways to parent-infant coordinated attention in naturalistic toy play

S27.ii:   Betina Karshaleva, University of California, San Diego

Infant vocalizations and maternal speech in naturalistic play: Contingencies from 4 to 12 months

S27.iii:   Catalina Suarez-Rivera, New York University

Everyday joint engagement: Coupling of the mothers body with the infants manual actions

S27.iv:   Jacob Schatz, New York University

Playing and learning together: Spontaneous joint engagement scaffolds infant play at home

S27 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.28  Exploring the circumstances in which infants attribute dispositions to agents

Chair: Megan Pronovost, California State University, Fresno

S28.i:   You-jung Choi, Harvard University

Three-month-old infants’ understanding of a human agent’s preference

S28.ii:   Su-hua Wang, University of California, Santa Cruz

Self-experience scaffolds infants’ reasoning about preference

S28.iii:   Lin Bian, Cornell University

8-month-olds attribute, and expect others to attribute, strong preferences to agents

S28.iv:   Megan Pronovost, California State University, Fresno

20-month-old infants’ attribution of behavioral dispositions to agents

S.28 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

10:00-11:00  End of Conference Proceedings 1 – Coffee / Cocktail hour

Day 4: July 9

04:00-05:30  Poster Session 4


 

05:30-07:00  Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.29  Integrating computational and neuroimaging methods to investigate infant cognitive development

Chair: Laurie Bayet, American University

S29.i:   Benjamin Zinszer, Princeton University

Decoding representations of familiar objects in young infants using fNIRS

S29.ii:   Laurie Bayet, American University

Time-course and properties of higher-order visual representations in the infant brain

S29.iii:   Rhodri Cusack, Trinity College Dublin

Deep neural networks as a model of learning during the helpless period of infancy

S29.iv:   Nicholas Turk-Browne, Yale University

Adult-grade cognitive neuroscience in infants

S29 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.30 The reciprocal roles of parents and children in organizing learning opportunities in dyadic interaction

Chair: Steven Elmlinger, Cornell University

Discussant: Michael Goldstein, Cornell University

S30.i:   Miriam Langeloh, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences

Are you like me? Contingent adult-infant interactions in a naturalistic dual-EEG paradigm

S30.ii:   Steven Elmlinger, Cornell University

The development of prelinguistic vocal sequences: implications for early communication and language

S30.iii:   Sara Schroer, Indiana University

Toddler vocalizations shape the structure of parent-child interactions

S30.iv:   Katharina Rohlfing, Paderborn University

Do maternal vocalizations scaffold children to take up an active role in peekaboo routine?

S.30 Q&A:  All presenters available to take questions during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST). Steven Elmlinger, Sara Schroer, and Katharina Rolfing are available during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT). Discussant: Michael Goldstein is available for both Q&A sessions

 

S.31 Fine-grained environmental data illuminate the process of language learning

Chair: Daniel Swingley, University of Pennsylvania

S31.i  Daniel Swingley, University of Pennsylvania

How learning word-forms could guide infants to phonetic categories: New evidence from English

S31.ii:   Catherine Tamis-LeMonda, New York University

The food for thought: Unpacking the everyday language experiences of infants

S31.iii:   Chen Yu, Indiana University

Rethinking input: The infant’s view challenges the problem of referential uncertainty in early word learning

S31.iv:   Emmanuel Dupoux, EHESS

Reverse engineering early language acquisition: Can machine learning help?

S31 Q&A: live questions taking place with all speakers during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST), with some speakers being available during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.32 What can video coding tell us about infant development? Methodological examples and new results from two preterm infant cohorts

Chair: Sue Fletcher-Watson, University of Edinburgh

S32.i:   Bethan Dean, University of Edinburgh

Longitudinal assessment of social cognition in infants born preterm using eye-tracking and parent-child play

S32.ii:   Sinead O’Carroll, University of Edinburgh

Frequency and type of parental gesture during parent-child play is influenced by socioeconomic status and gestational age at birth

S32.iii:   Lorna Ginnell, University of Edinburgh

Reduced emotional response to the still-face paradigm in preterm infants

S.32 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.33 Parent-infant interaction styles in diverse populations and their impact on infant development

Chair: Sarah Lloyd-Fox, Cambridge University

S33.i:   Bosiljka Milosavljevic, Birkbeck, University of London

Mother-infant interactions, maternal mental health and infant cognitive outcomes in The Gambia

S33.ii:   Ciara Kelly, University of Sheffield

The communication of deaf infants with hearing parents

S33.iii:   Evelyne Mercure, Goldsmiths, University of London

Deaf mothers and their hearing infants: Social interaction, maternal sensitivity and language development

S33.iv:   Atsushi Senju, Birkbeck, University of London

Development of social attention and communication in infants of blind parents

S.33 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

05:30-10:00  Poster Session 4 (available on demand)


 

07:00-08:30 Live Symposium Sessions

 

Invited Session: Solutions for studying early language development (90 minutes with live Q&A)

Katie Alcock, Lancaster University

Mike Frank, Stanford

Elizabeth Norton, Northwestern

Jessica Horst, University of Sussex (moderator)

Webinar: Stress and Development live webinar (75 minutes)

Marion van den Heuvel, Tilburg University

Dima Amso, Brown University

Natasha Kirkham, Birkbeck, University of London

Brittney Chere, Birkbeck, University of London (moderator)


 

08:30-10:00  Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.34  Parent-infant interactions and language development in infants with communication disorders

Chair: Yuanyuan Wang, Ohio State University

S34.i :   Yuanyuan Wang, Ohio State University

The effects of hearing loss on the social feedback loop in infants with cochlear implants

S34.ii:   Girija Kadlaskar, Purdue University

Caregiver touch-speech communication and infant responses in 12-month-olds at high risk for autism spectrum disorder

S34.iii:   John Bunce, California State University East Bay

Why do I keep repeating myself? Exploring how parental assumptions of children’s comprehension effects word repetition patterns

S34.iv:   Derek Houston, The Ohio State University

Parent-infant interactions and word-learning skills in deaf infants with cochlear implants

S34 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.35  Novel approaches to electroencephalogram (EEG) lateralization: Beyond traditional asymmetry

Chair: Maria Gartstein, Washington State University

S35.i:   Maria Gartstein, Washington State University

EEG frontal asymmetry changes during emotion-eliciting tasks and parent-child interaction dynamics

S35.ii:   Ross Vanderwert, Cardiff University

Individual differences in frontal asymmetry while viewing emotion faces: A capability model approach

S35.iii:   Martha Ann Bell, Virginia Tech

Predictors of level of negative affect after arm restraint at 5 months

S35.iv:   Nancy Jones, Florida Atlantic University

Infant neurophysiological patterns and temperament are linked to maternal depressive symptoms

S.35 Q&A:  Ross Vanderwert will be available for questions during Congress Proceedings 1 (BST), with Maria Gartstein, Martha Ann Bell and Nancy Jones available for questions during Congress Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.36 Learning ‘hard words’: The role of conceptual representations when the tough gets tougher

Chair: Laura Lakusta, Montclair State University

S36.i:   Nicolò Cesana Arlotti, Johns Hopkins University

An investigation of the origins of logical quantification: Infant’s (and adult’s) representations of exhaustivity in collective or individual complex actions

S36.ii:   Ariel Starr, University of Washington

Spatial metaphor facilitates word learning

S36.iii:   Laura Lakusta, Montclair State University

Getting support for ‘support’: The privileging of ‘Support-From-Below’ in early spatial language acquisition

S.36 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

S.37 Cultural differences in mind-mindedness and infant-mother interaction

Chair: Elizabeth Meins, University of York

S37.i:   Catherine McMahon, Macquarie University

Cross-cultural comparison of maternal mind-mindedness among Australian and Chinese mothers of toddlers

S37.ii:   Yujin Lee, University of York

How does culture and empathy relate to mothers’ mind-mindedness?

S37.iii:  Nao Fujita, University of Cambridge

A cross-cultural comparison of maternal mind-mindedness and speech characteristics between Japan and the UK

S37.iv:   Katie Slocombe, University of York

Cross-cultural differences in mother-infant play behaviour

S.37 Q&A:  Katie Slocombe, Nao Fujita and Yujin Lee will be available for questions during Congress Proceedings 1 (BST), with Cathy McMahon being available for questions during Congress Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.38  Better safe than sorry: Infants’ use of social information to reason and learn about threat

Chair: Shari Liu, Harvard University

S38.i:   Shari Liu, Harvard University

Dangerous ground: Thirteen-month-old infants are sensitive to peril in other people’s actions

S38.ii:   Camille Rioux, Max Planck Institute for Human Development

Social information reduces infants’ avoidance of plants

S38.iii:   Tobias Grossmann, University of Virginia

Friend or foe? Impression formation in the human infant brain

S38.iv:   Zoe Liberman, University of California Santa Barbara

Not all negative emotions are equal: Infants selectively attend to threat

S.38 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

10:00-11:00  End of Conference Proceedings 1 – Coffee / Cocktail hour

*Sessions available on demand next day

Day 1: July 6

21:00-22:30   Poster Session 1


 

22:30-00:00  Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.1  Early language across-cultures: Input, language processes and outcome measures

Chair: Laia Fibla, University of East Anglia

S1.i:   Marisa Casillas, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

Day-wide patterns in the use of child-directed speech in two non-Western, subsistence farming communities

S1.ii:   Camila Scaff,  University of Zurich

Exploring conversational turns and partners among Tsimane forager-horticulturalists

S1.iii:   Alejandrina Cristia, CNRS, PSL University

Spontaneous vocalizations from birth to age four: Insights from a mega-analysis of 13,785 hours of audio

S1.iv:   Laia Fibla, University of East Anglia

Early language processing and language exposure across-cultures: UK and India

S1 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) with some speakers being available during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.2 Environmental influences on infant attention: A global perspective

Chair: Sarah Lloyd-Fox, University of Cambridge

S2.i:   Samantha McCann, King’s College London

Undernutrition in infancy impacts early brain development in The Gambia: An fNIRS study

S2.ii:   Annie Brandes-Aitken, New York University

Contributions of cumulative parent cortisol to the neural underpinnings of infant attention and emotion regulation

S2.iii:   Sam Wass, University of East London

Physiological stress, sustained attention and cognitive engagement in 12-month-old infants from urban environments

S2 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.3 Investigating the relationship between representing the self and the other in early development

Chair: Victoria Southgate, University of Copenhagen

S3.i:   Chiara Bulgarelli, University College London

The role of self-awareness in selective facial mimicry of native over foreign speakers

S3.ii:   Dora Kampis, University of Copenhagen

The mapping of others to oneself in 16-26-old infants

S3.iii:   Josephine Ross, University of Dundee

Autocentric or allocentric? Exploring the co-development of self-representation and positive social behavior

S3.iv:   Milica Nikolic, University of Amsterdam

Implicit self-recognition in infancy predicts self-conscious emotional reactivity in childhood

 

S.4 Early markers for neurodevelopmental disorders: Towards the identification of trajectories to atypical cognitive outcomes

Chairs: Viola Macchi Cassia, University of Milano-Bicocca & Chiara Cantiani, Scientific Institute, IRCCS Medea

S4.i:   Valeria Costanzo, IRCCS Stella Maris Foundation

Social and non-social early markers of ASD: The relationship between disengagement of attention and joint attention in high-risk siblings at 12 months of life

S4.ii:   Valentina Riva, Scientific Institute, IRCCS Medea

Atypical ERP responses to multisensory integration in infants at risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder

S4.iii:   Roberta Bettoni, University of Milano-Bicocca

Visual implicit learning abilities in infants at familial risk for Development Language Disorder

S4.iv:   Gaia Scherif, Oxford University

Understanding variable outcomes in genetic syndromes: The importance of early developmental phenotyping

S4 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.5 The rhythm of our heart and mind: Neurophysiological responses to communicative rhythms in parent-infant interactions

Chair: Trinh Nguyen, University of Vienna

S5.i:   Trinh Nguyen, University of Vienna

The role of physiological synchrony for attachment

S5.ii:   Christina Schätz, University of Vienna

Effects of maternal infant-directed singing on infant physiological arousal

S5.iii:   Ira Marriott Haresign, The University of East London

Mutual gaze leads to phase reorganization and concomitant short-term increases in interpersonal neural synchrony

S5.iv: Shir Atzil, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

S5 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

21:30-03:00  Poster Session 1 (available on demand)


00:15-00:30  Welcoming remarks with ICIS President Lisa Oakes


00:30-01:30 Live Symposium Sessions

Invited Session: Solutions for studying development in clinical settings (60 minutes with live Q&A)

Bridgette Kelleher, Purdue University

Evelyne Mercure, Goldsmiths, University of London

Susan Rivera, University of California Davis (moderator)

 

Webinar: How to have effective collaborations: Advice from the Manybabies team live webinar (60 minutes)

Christina Bergmann, Max Planck Institute

Kiley Hamlin, University of British Columbia

Krista Byers-Heinlein, Concordia University

Casey Lew-Williams, Princeton (moderator)


 

01:30-03:00  Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.6  Timing is everything: The temporal dynamics of labeling in typical and atypical language development

Chair: Jill Lany, University of Liverpool

S6.i:   Jill Lany, University of Liverpool

The temporal dynamics of labeling shape object recognition

S6.ii:   Michael Goldstein, Cornell University

Relative contributions of infant-directed speech and motion when learning new words

S6.iii:   Madhavilatha Maganti, Ashoka University

Maternal synchronous gesture adaptations during object naming to term and preterm infants: A longitudinal study

S6.iv:   Chi-hsin Chen, The Ohio State University

Children’s hearing loss affects the synchrony between parents’ object naming and children’s attention to objects in parent-child interactions

 

S.7  Individual differences in attentional control and executive functions in the first two years of life

Chair: Alexandra Hendry, University of Oxford

S7.i:   Maria Rosario Rueda, University of Granada

Early development of the executive attention network in infancy

S7.ii:   Martha Ann Bell, Virginia Tech

Monthly development of cognitive and attention inhibition in the first year

S7.iii:   Alexandra Hendry, University of Oxford

Inhibitory control at 10 and 16 months on the A-not-B task and the Early Childhood Inhibitory Touchscreen Task

S7 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.8 Parent and child contributions to emotion regulation: Beyond main effects to complex developmental pathways

Chair: Kaya de Barbaro, University of Texas at Austin

S8.i:   Lauren Bailes, University of North Carolina Greensboro

Mother and infant contributions to infant negative emotionality over time

S8.ii:   Kaya de Barbaro, University of Texas at Austin

Mama tried: Contingent responding to distress does not increase rate of real-time soothing in infants high in negative emotionality

S8.iii:   Niyantri Ravindran, The Pennsylvania State University

Parental structuring of toddler negative emotion predicts children’s use of distraction longitudinally

S8.iv: Maria Gartstein, Washington State University (Discussant)

S8 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.9  The role of action understanding in early sociomoral cognition

Chair: Brandon Woo, Harvard University

S9.i  Denis Tatone, Central European University

Twelve-month-old infants use payoff information to disambiguate the goals of agents involved in a joint activity

S9.ii:   Fransisca Ting, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

16-month-old infants perceive irrational individuals as having reduced moral rights

S9.iii:   Brandon Woo, Harvard University

Social cognition in context: Infants’ evaluations of helping in means-end sequences

S9.iv:   Elizabeth Enright, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Toddlers consider others’ goals when helping others

S.9 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.10  The I in team: Individual differences in infancy shape social competence and prosociality

Chair: Jess Aitken, University of Auckland

S10.i:   Robert Hepach, Leipzig University

Children’s positive emotions following helping others and seeing others being helped: Evidence for a developmental shift

S10.ii :   Jess Aitken, University of Auckland

Temperament and cooperative ability in infancy: Are effects of temperament mediated through children’s social behaviour during cooperative tasks?

S10.iii:   Amanda Brandone, Lehigh University

Developmental pathways from infant social cognition to later prosocial behavior and theory of mind

S10.iv:   Moritz Köster, Freie Universität Berlin

A developmental systems approach to early helping behavior

S.10 Q&A: Robert Hepach, Amanda Brandone & Moritz Köster will be available for questions during Congress Proceedings 1 (BST), with Amanda Brandone and Jess Aitken available for questions during both Congress Proceedings 1 (BST) and 2 (PDT)
 

 

03:00-04:00  End of Conference Proceedings 1 – Coffee / Cocktail hour

Day 2: July 7

21:00-22:30  Poster Session 2


 

22:30-00:00 Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.11  The origins of causal thought

Chair: Jonathan Kominsky, Rutgers University – Newark

S11.i:   Deon Benton, Brown University

Stop in the name of contact: How infants learn about the causal properties of people and objects

S11.ii:   Samantha Wood, Indiana University

Reverse engineering the origins of causal knowledge

S11.iii:   Katarina Begus, Rutgers University – Newark

Not all information is created equal: Investigating infants’ sensitivity to confounded information in a causal reasoning task

S11.iv:   Jonathan Kominsky, Rutgers University – Newark

Disconnected causal representations in the first year of life

S11 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

S.12 The structure and function of biobehavioral synchrony in early development

Chair: Bennett Bertenthal, Indiana University

S12.i:   Elizabeth daSilva, Indiana University-Purdue University Columbus

Infant-mother physiological synchrony moderates infants’ self-regulation

S12.ii:   Stefanie Höhl, University of Vienna

Tuned in: Neural synchrony in mother-infant dyads

S12.iii:   Elise Piazza, Princeton University

Neural synchrony predicts novel word learning from storybooks

S12.iv:   Megan Whitehorn, UEL

Parental frontal brain activity tracks infant attention during shared play

S12 Q&A: live questions taking place during both Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) and 2 (PDT) 

 

S.13 Rhythm perception in infants: Neural, pupillary, and motor entrainment to speech

Chair: Judit Gervain, Université Paris Descartes

S13.i:   Tineke M. Snijders, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

Tracking speech rhythm in the 7.5 month old infant brain is related to word segmentation performance at 9 months

S13.ii:   Áine Ní Choisdealbha, University of Cambridge

Changes in neural rhythmic entrainment during the first year of life

S13.iii:   Alan Langus, University of Potsdam

Individual variability in pupillary entrainment predicts speech segmentation with prosodic and statistical cues in infancy

S13.iv:   Natalie Boll-Avetisyan, University of Potsdam

Infants show spontaneous motor entrainment while listening to rhythmic speech

 

S.14 Understanding infants’ lives by the use of smartphones: Experience sampling and ambulatory assessment

Chair: Stephanie Wermelinger, University of Zurich

S14.i:   Sophie von Stumm, University of York

Using digital technologies for assessing infants’ cognitive development in real-time

S14.ii:   Nivedita Mani, University of Goettingen

Online testing technology for infant touchscreen and looking time tasks

S14.iii:   Stephanie Wermelinger, University of Zurich

Identifiying dynamic developmental processes during infancy by using the WeltentdeckerApp

S14 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

22:30-03:15  Poster Session 2 (available on demand)


 

00:00-01:30  Live Symposium Sessions

Invited Session: Secondary Data analysis of existing data files (90 minutes with live Q&A)

Michael Thomas, Birkbeck, University of London

Alex Cristia, CNRS

Marije Verhage, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam

Sarah Jensen, Boston College (moderator)

 

Invited Session: Online solutions for data collection (90 minutes minutes with live Q&A)

Rhodri Cusack, Trinity College Dublin

Emily Jones & Elena Throm, Birkbeck, University of London

Caspar Addyman, Goldsmiths, University of London

Natasha Kirkham, Birkbeck, University of London (moderator)


 

01:45-03:15  Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.15  Brain & Behavior: New insights into neural correlates of infant emotion regulation

Chair: Courtney Filippi, University of Maryland

S15.i:   Elina Thomas, Oregon Health and Science University

Newborn amygdala connectivity to prefrontal and sensory regions is associated with early emerging regulatory behavior

S15.ii:   Courtney Filippi, University of Maryland

Associations between amygdala connectivity and negative reactive temperament

S15.iii:   Chad Sylvester, Washington University

Maternal Anxiety and Neonatal Brain Response to Novel Sounds as Assessed with fMRI

S15 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.16  Insights from outside the lab: Modeling observational data to understand language learning

Chair: Mika Braginsky, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

S16.i:   Eva Portelance, Stanford University

Using neural network language models to predict age of acquisition for early vocabulary

S16.ii:   Stephan Meylan, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Characterizing child-directed listening with corpus and model-based analyses

S16.iii:   Mika Braginsky, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Characterizing the relationship between lexical and morphological development

S16.iv:   Georgia Loukatou, CNRS, PSL University

Assessing cross-linguistic viability of infant word segmentation models

S.16 Q&A: Georia Loukatou will be available for questions during Congress Proceedings 1 (BST), with Eva Portelance, Stephan Meylan & Mika Braginsky available for questions during both Congress Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.17 How multiple exemplars help infants and young children extend their knowledge

Chair: Jane Childers, Trinity University

S17.i:   Susan Graham, University of Calgary

Multiple exemplars facilitate 9-month-olds’ property generalizations

S17.ii:   Jane Childers, Trinity University

Extending verbs to new events: Does the comparison of events over delays help?

S17.iii:   Christina Schonberg, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Why do multiple examples help children learn words? The roles of aggregation, decontextualization, and memory dynamics

S17.iv:  Scott Johnson, University of California, Los Angeles

Discussant

S.17 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

S.18  Child evocative effects in the context of parenting across developmental systems: A behavioral and neurophysiological perspective

Chair: Diane Lickenbrock, Western Kentucky University

S18.i:   Kayla Brown, The Pennsylvania State University

Difficult temperament profiles and externalizing behaviors: The moderating effects on harsh parenting and dyadic inconsistency

S18.ii:   Berenice Anaya, Penn State University

Maternal anxiety and infant negative affect trajectories: The role of neural and environmental factors during infancy

S18.iii:   Diane Lickenbrock, Western Kentucky University

Infant physiological regulation with mothers and fathers: The effects of infant temperament and parent factors

S18 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.19  Fair’s fair?: Intentions and relationships impact infants’ expectations about fairness and preferences for fair individuals

Chair: Zoe Liberman, University of California Santa Barbara

S19.i:   Luca Surian, University of Trento

Preverbal infants’ intention-based evaluations of fairness

S19.ii:   Anna-Elisabeth Baumann, University of Chicago

Infants’ reactions to resource distribution outcomes as a function of ingroup/outgroup manipulations and language status

S19.iii:   Lin Bian, Cornell University

Do 4-month-olds take into account group membership when judging fair outcomes?

S19.iv:   Zoe Liberman, University of California Santa Barbara

Infants predict that distributors will act partially towards their friends

S.19 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

03:15-04:00  End of Conference Proceedings 1 – Coffee / Cocktail hour

Day 3: July 8

21:00-22:30  Poster Session 3


 

22:30-00:00  Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.20  Enhancing our understanding of social cognition in infancy through cutting-edge technology and individualized approaches

Chair: Giorgia Bussu, Radboud University Medical Center

S20.i:   Maheen Siddiqui, Birkbeck, University of London

Spatially resolved measures of cytochrome-c-oxidase during functional activation in infants

S20.ii:   David López Pérez, Institute of Psychology, Polish Academy of Sciences

Efficiency of scanning in infancy in the presence and absence of faces differentially predicts expressive and receptive language in toddlers

S20.iii:   Giorgia Bussu, Radboud University Medical Center

An individual approach to understand the nature of face processing in early autism

S20.iv:   Anna Gui, Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development, Birkbeck College, University of London

Neuroadaptive optimization to study how neural signatures of attention to faces in infants relate to later autism

S.20 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.21 Not just the linguistic factor! Associations between maternal child-directed speech and cognitive and socio-emotional competencies

Chair: Maria Spinelli, University G. D’Annunzio Chieti-Pescara

Discussant: Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, Temple University

S21.i:   Prachi Shah, University of Michigan

Parent language stimulation, parent sensitivity and socioeconomic status: Associations with curiosity

S21.ii:   Chiara Suttora, University of Bologna

The role of maternal verbal input in the emergence of mental lexicon in early childhood

S21.iii:   Maria Spinelli, University G. D’Annunzio Chieti-Pescara

Talk to me mum! The longitudinal effects of prosodic and linguistic characteristics of infant directed speech on the development of child attention and emotion regulation

S21.iv:   Brianna McMillan, Temple University

Fluid, back-and-forth conversation sets a foundation for infant executive function skills

S.21 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

S.22 Tips, tricks, and statistics: Recommendations for improving infant research methods

Chair: Lena V. Kremin, Concordia University

S22.i:   Esther Schott, Concordia University

Tools for transparency: Practical tips for sharing your research

S22.ii:   Lena V. Kremin, Concordia University

Let the data do the talking: Optimizing visualizations for transparency and readability

S22.iii:   Nivedita Mani, University of Goettingen

Bayesian sequential testing in developmental research

S22.iv:   Alejandrina Cristia, ENS, EHESS, CNRS, PSL University

Using long-form recordings to study infants’ speech input and outcomes: Opportunities and challenges

S22 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.23 Building contingency: How caregiver and child characteristics relate to interactions that support infant language

Chair: Lillian Masek, Temple University

S23.i:   Rebecca Alper, Temple University

One is not enough: Understanding variability in early language interaction quality using parent self-efficacy and developmental knowledge profiles

S23.ii:   Lillian Masek, Temple University

Building fluid and connected conversation: How caregiver speech differentially relates to interaction quality

S23.iii:   Rufan Luo, Rutgers University, Camden

Maternal question use and child language outcomes: The moderating role of SES and children’s concurrent vocabulary

S.23 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

22:30-03:00  Poster Session 3 (available on demand)


 

00:00-01:15 Live Symposium Sessions

Invited Session: Modeling development from existing data (75 minutes with Q&A)

Gert Westermann, Lancaster University

Jochen Triesch, Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies

Katherine Twomey, University of Manchester (moderator)

Live Webinar: Data Repositories: Resources for studying development (75 minutes)

Karen Adolph, New York University

Marisa Casillas, Max Planck Institute

Brian MacWhinney, Carnegie Mellon University

Caitlin Fausey, University of Oregon (moderator)


 

01:30-03:00  Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.24  Novel technologies to assess language development in infants

Chair: Julien Mayor, University of Oslo

S24.i:   Virginia Marchman, Stanford University

Using web-based platforms to expand the socioeconomic reach of parent report measures of vocabulary development

S24.ii:   Julien Mayor, University of Oslo

BabyLex-IRT: Estimating early vocabulary sizes using a Bayesian-inspired item-response theory approach

S24.iii:   Camila Scaff, University of Zurich

Socio-economic status and word comprehension in early childhood: A study in a low inequality setting and a meta-analytic review

S24.iv:   Amanda Seidl, Purdue University

The development of canonical babble in a crosslinguistic and cross-cultural corpus

S24 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.25: Embracing new technologies to quantify early learning environments

Chair: Sara Schroer, Indiana University

S25.i:   Sara Schroer, Indiana University

Hands-on learning: Toddler’s multimodal attention at naming moments leads to successful word learning

S25.ii:   George Kachergis, Stanford University

Automatically detecting children’s visual access to social information in egocentric videos

S25.iii:   Marisa Casillas, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

The linguistic landscapes of learning in two small-scale societies

S25.iv:   Mira Nencheva, Princeton University

Analyzing emotion in language input: Caregivers’ cues to valence support toddlers’ learning of emotion words

S.25 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) and Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.26 Updates from the ManyBabies Consortium: Four collaborative replications of important findings in infancy research

Chair: Michael Frank, Stanford University

S26.i:   Angeline Sin Mei Tsui, Stanford University

ManyBabies 1B: Testing bilinguals’ preference for infant-directed speech

S26.ii:   Dora Kampis, University of Copenhagen

ManyBabies 2: Theory of mind in infancy

S26.iii:   Ingmar Visser, University of Amsterdam

ManyBabies 3: Infant rule learning: a multi-lab replication study

S26.iv:   Kelsey Lucca, Arizona State University

ManyBabies 4: A large-scale, multi-lab, coordinated replication study of infants’ social evaluations

S26 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.27  Real-world interactions in Real Time: Moment-to-moment dynamics of parent-infant joint engagement in naturalistic contexts

Chair: Catalina Suarez-Rivera, New York University

S27.i:   Chen Yu, Indiana University

Multiple sensorimotor pathways to parent-infant coordinated attention in naturalistic toy play

S27.ii:   Betina Karshaleva, University of California, San Diego

Infant vocalizations and maternal speech in naturalistic play: Contingencies from 4 to 12 months

S27.iii:   Catalina Suarez-Rivera, New York University

Everyday joint engagement: Coupling of the mothers body with the infants manual actions

S27.iv:   Jacob Schatz, New York University

Playing and learning together: Spontaneous joint engagement scaffolds infant play at home

S27 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.28  Exploring the circumstances in which infants attribute dispositions to agents

Chair: Megan Pronovost, California State University, Fresno

S28.i:   You-jung Choi, Harvard University

Three-month-old infants’ understanding of a human agent’s preference

S28.ii:   Su-hua Wang, University of California, Santa Cruz

Self-experience scaffolds infants’ reasoning about preference

S28.iii:   Lin Bian, Cornell University

8-month-olds attribute, and expect others to attribute, strong preferences to agents

S28.iv:   Megan Pronovost, California State University, Fresno

20-month-old infants’ attribution of behavioral dispositions to agents

S.28 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

03:00-04:00  End of Conference Proceedings 1 – Coffee / Cocktail hour

Day 4: July 9

21:00-22:30  Poster Session 4


 

22:30-00:00  Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.29  Integrating computational and neuroimaging methods to investigate infant cognitive development

Chair: Laurie Bayet, American University

S29.i:   Benjamin Zinszer, Princeton University

Decoding representations of familiar objects in young infants using fNIRS

S29.ii:   Laurie Bayet, American University

Time-course and properties of higher-order visual representations in the infant brain

S29.iii:   Rhodri Cusack, Trinity College Dublin

Deep neural networks as a model of learning during the helpless period of infancy

S29.iv:   Nicholas Turk-Browne, Yale University

Adult-grade cognitive neuroscience in infants

S29 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.30 The reciprocal roles of parents and children in organizing learning opportunities in dyadic interaction

Chair: Steven Elmlinger, Cornell University

Discussant: Michael Goldstein, Cornell University

S30.i:   Miriam Langeloh, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences

Are you like me? Contingent adult-infant interactions in a naturalistic dual-EEG paradigm

S30.ii:   Steven Elmlinger, Cornell University

The development of prelinguistic vocal sequences: implications for early communication and language

S30.iii:   Sara Schroer, Indiana University

Toddler vocalizations shape the structure of parent-child interactions

S30.iv:   Katharina Rohlfing, Paderborn University

Do maternal vocalizations scaffold children to take up an active role in peekaboo routine?

S.30 Q&A:  All presenters available to take questions during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST). Steven Elmlinger, Sara Schroer, and Katharina Rolfing are available during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT). Discussant: Michael Goldstein is available for both Q&A sessions

 

S.31 Fine-grained environmental data illuminate the process of language learning

Chair: Daniel Swingley, University of Pennsylvania

S31.i  Daniel Swingley, University of Pennsylvania

How learning word-forms could guide infants to phonetic categories: New evidence from English

S31.ii:   Catherine Tamis-LeMonda, New York University

The food for thought: Unpacking the everyday language experiences of infants

S31.iii:   Chen Yu, Indiana University

Rethinking input: The infant’s view challenges the problem of referential uncertainty in early word learning

S31.iv:   Emmanuel Dupoux, EHESS

Reverse engineering early language acquisition: Can machine learning help?

S31 Q&A: live questions taking place with all speakers during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST), with some speakers being available during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.32 What can video coding tell us about infant development? Methodological examples and new results from two preterm infant cohorts

Chair: Sue Fletcher-Watson, University of Edinburgh

S32.i:   Bethan Dean, University of Edinburgh

Longitudinal assessment of social cognition in infants born preterm using eye-tracking and parent-child play

S32.ii:   Sinead O’Carroll, University of Edinburgh

Frequency and type of parental gesture during parent-child play is influenced by socioeconomic status and gestational age at birth

S32.iii:   Lorna Ginnell, University of Edinburgh

Reduced emotional response to the still-face paradigm in preterm infants

S.32 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.33 Parent-infant interaction styles in diverse populations and their impact on infant development

Chair: Sarah Lloyd-Fox, Cambridge University

S33.i:   Bosiljka Milosavljevic, Birkbeck, University of London

Mother-infant interactions, maternal mental health and infant cognitive outcomes in The Gambia

S33.ii:   Ciara Kelly, University of Sheffield

The communication of deaf infants with hearing parents

S33.iii:   Evelyne Mercure, Goldsmiths, University of London

Deaf mothers and their hearing infants: Social interaction, maternal sensitivity and language development

S33.iv:   Atsushi Senju, Birkbeck, University of London

Development of social attention and communication in infants of blind parents

S.33 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

22:30-03:00  Poster Session 4 (available on demand)


 

00:00-01:30 Live Symposium Sessions

 

Invited Session: Solutions for studying early language development (90 minutes with live Q&A)

Katie Alcock, Lancaster University

Mike Frank, Stanford

Elizabeth Norton, Northwestern

Jessica Horst, University of Sussex (moderator)

Webinar: Stress and Development live live webinar (75 minutes)

Marion van den Heuvel, Tilburg University

Dima Amso, Brown University

Natasha Kirkham, Birkbeck, University of London

Brittney Chere, Birkbeck, University of London (moderator)


 

01:30-03:00  Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.34  Parent-infant interactions and language development in infants with communication disorders

Chair: Yuanyuan Wang, Ohio State University

S34.i :   Yuanyuan Wang, Ohio State University

The effects of hearing loss on the social feedback loop in infants with cochlear implants

S34.ii:   Girija Kadlaskar, Purdue University

Caregiver touch-speech communication and infant responses in 12-month-olds at high risk for autism spectrum disorder

S34.iii:   John Bunce, California State University East Bay

Why do I keep repeating myself? Exploring how parental assumptions of children’s comprehension effects word repetition patterns

S34.iv:   Derek Houston, The Ohio State University

Parent-infant interactions and word-learning skills in deaf infants with cochlear implants

S34 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.35  Novel approaches to electroencephalogram (EEG) lateralization: Beyond traditional asymmetry

Chair: Maria Gartstein, Washington State University

S35.i:   Maria Gartstein, Washington State University

EEG frontal asymmetry changes during emotion-eliciting tasks and parent-child interaction dynamics

S35.ii:   Ross Vanderwert, Cardiff University

Individual differences in frontal asymmetry while viewing emotion faces: A capability model approach

S35.iii:   Martha Ann Bell, Virginia Tech

Predictors of level of negative affect after arm restraint at 5 months

S35.iv:   Nancy Jones, Florida Atlantic University

Infant neurophysiological patterns and temperament are linked to maternal depressive symptoms

S.35 Q&A:  Ross Vanderwert will be available for questions during Congress Proceedings 1 (BST), with Maria Gartstein, Martha Ann Bell and Nancy Jones available for questions during Congress Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.36 Learning ‘hard words’: The role of conceptual representations when the tough gets tougher

Chair: Laura Lakusta, Montclair State University

S36.i:   Nicolò Cesana Arlotti, Johns Hopkins University

An investigation of the origins of logical quantification: Infant’s (and adult’s) representations of exhaustivity in collective or individual complex actions

S36.ii:   Ariel Starr, University of Washington

Spatial metaphor facilitates word learning

S36.iii:   Laura Lakusta, Montclair State University

Getting support for ‘support’: The privileging of ‘Support-From-Below’ in early spatial language acquisition

S.36 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

S.37 Cultural differences in mind-mindedness and infant-mother interaction

Chair: Elizabeth Meins, University of York

S37.i:   Catherine McMahon, Macquarie University

Cross-cultural comparison of maternal mind-mindedness among Australian and Chinese mothers of toddlers

S37.ii:   Yujin Lee, University of York

How does culture and empathy relate to mothers’ mind-mindedness?

S37.iii:  Nao Fujita, University of Cambridge

A cross-cultural comparison of maternal mind-mindedness and speech characteristics between Japan and the UK

S37.iv:   Katie Slocombe, University of York

Cross-cultural differences in mother-infant play behaviour

S.37 Q&A:  Katie Slocombe, Nao Fujita and Yujin Lee will be available for questions during Congress Proceedings 1 (BST), with Cathy McMahon being available for questions during Congress Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.38  Better safe than sorry: Infants’ use of social information to reason and learn about threat

Chair: Shari Liu, Harvard University

S38.i:   Shari Liu, Harvard University

Dangerous ground: Thirteen-month-old infants are sensitive to peril in other people’s actions

S38.ii:   Camille Rioux, Max Planck Institute for Human Development

Social information reduces infants’ avoidance of plants

S38.iii:   Tobias Grossmann, University of Virginia

Friend or foe? Impression formation in the human infant brain

S38.iv:   Zoe Liberman, University of California Santa Barbara

Not all negative emotions are equal: Infants selectively attend to threat

S.38 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

03:00-04:00  End of Conference Proceedings 1 – Coffee / Cocktail hour

Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT)

*Sessions available on demand next day

 

Day 1: July 6

11:00-12:30  Poster Session 1


 

12:30-14:00  Symposium Sessions

 

S.1  Early language across-cultures: Input, language processes and outcome measures

Chair: Laia Fibla, University of East Anglia

S1.i:   Marisa Casillas, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

Day-wide patterns in the use of child-directed speech in two non-Western, subsistence farming communities

S1.ii:   Camila Scaff,  University of Zurich

Exploring conversational turns and partners among Tsimane forager-horticulturalists

S1.iii:   Alejandrina Cristia, CNRS, PSL University

Spontaneous vocalizations from birth to age four: Insights from a mega-analysis of 13,785 hours of audio

S1.iv:   Laia Fibla, University of East Anglia

Early language processing and language exposure across-cultures: UK and India

S1 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) with some speakers being available during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.2 Environmental influences on infant attention: A global perspective

Chair: Sarah Lloyd-Fox, University of Cambridge

S2.i:   Samantha McCann, King’s College London

Undernutrition in infancy impacts early brain development in The Gambia: An fNIRS study

S2.ii:   Annie Brandes-Aitken, New York University

Contributions of cumulative parent cortisol to the neural underpinnings of infant attention and emotion regulation

S2.iii:   Sam Wass, University of East London

Physiological stress, sustained attention and cognitive engagement in 12-month-old infants from urban environments

S2 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.3 Investigating the relationship between representing the self and the other in early development

Chair: Victoria Southgate, University of Copenhagen

S3.i:   Chiara Bulgarelli, University College London

The role of self-awareness in selective facial mimicry of native over foreign speakers

S3.ii:   Dora Kampis, University of Copenhagen

The mapping of others to oneself in 16-26-old infants

S3.iii:   Josephine Ross, University of Dundee

Autocentric or allocentric? Exploring the co-development of self-representation and positive social behavior

S3.iv:   Milica Nikolic, University of Amsterdam

Implicit self-recognition in infancy predicts self-conscious emotional reactivity in childhood

 

S.4 Early markers for neurodevelopmental disorders: Towards the identification of trajectories to atypical cognitive outcomes

Chairs: Viola Macchi Cassia, University of Milano-Bicocca & Chiara Cantiani, Scientific Institute, IRCCS Medea

S4.i:   Valeria Costanzo, IRCCS Stella Maris Foundation

Social and non-social early markers of ASD: The relationship between disengagement of attention and joint attention in high-risk siblings at 12 months of life

S4.ii:   Valentina Riva, Scientific Institute, IRCCS Medea

Atypical ERP responses to multisensory integration in infants at risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder

S4.iii:   Roberta Bettoni, University of Milano-Bicocca

Visual implicit learning abilities in infants at familial risk for Development Language Disorder

S4.iv:   Gaia Scherif, Oxford University

Understanding variable outcomes in genetic syndromes: The importance of early developmental phenotyping

S4 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.5 The rhythm of our heart and mind: Neurophysiological responses to communicative rhythms in parent-infant interactions

Chair: Trinh Nguyen, University of Vienna

S5.i:   Trinh Nguyen, University of Vienna

The role of physiological synchrony for attachment

S5.ii:   Christina Schätz, University of Vienna

Effects of maternal infant-directed singing on infant physiological arousal

S5.iii:   Ira Marriott Haresign, The University of East London

Mutual gaze leads to phase reorganization and concomitant short-term increases in interpersonal neural synchrony

S5.iv: Shir Atzil, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Discussion

S5 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

12:30-17:00  Poster Session 1 (available on demand)


14:00-14:30  Welcoming remarks with ICIS President Lisa Oakes


14:30-15:30 Pre-recorded Symposium Sessions

Invited Session: Solutions for studying development in clinical settings (60 minutes with live Q&A)

Bridgette Kelleher, Purdue University

Evelyne Mercure, Goldsmiths, University of London

Susan Rivera, University of California Davis (moderator)

 

Recorded Webinar: How to have effective collaborations: Advice from the ManyBabies team live webinar (60 minutes)

Christina Bergmann, Max Planck Institute

Kiley Hamlin, University of British Columbia

Krista Byers-Heinlein, Concordia University

Casey Lew-Williams, Princeton (moderator)


 

15:30-17:00  Symposium Sessions

 

S.6  Timing is everything: The temporal dynamics of labeling in typical and atypical language development

Chair: Jill Lany, University of Liverpool

S6.i:   Jill Lany, University of Liverpool

The temporal dynamics of labeling shape object recognition

S6.ii:   Michael Goldstein, Cornell University

Relative contributions of infant-directed speech and motion when learning new words

S6.iii:   Madhavilatha Maganti, Ashoka University

Maternal synchronous gesture adaptations during object naming to term and preterm infants: A longitudinal study

S6.iv:   Chi-hsin Chen, The Ohio State University

Children’s hearing loss affects the synchrony between parents’ object naming and children’s attention to objects in parent-child interactions

 

S.7  Individual differences in attentional control and executive functions in the first two years of life

Chair: Alexandra Hendry, University of Oxford

S7.i:   Maria Rosario Rueda, University of Granada

Early development of the executive attention network in infancy

S7.ii:   Martha Ann Bell, Virginia Tech

Monthly development of cognitive and attention inhibition in the first year

S7.iii:   Alexandra Hendry, University of Oxford

Inhibitory control at 10 and 16 months on the A-not-B task and the Early Childhood Inhibitory Touchscreen Task

S7 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.8 Parent and child contributions to emotion regulation: Beyond main effects to complex developmental pathways

Chair: Kaya de Barbaro, University of Texas at Austin

S8.i:   Lauren Bailes, University of North Carolina Greensboro

Mother and infant contributions to infant negative emotionality over time

S8.ii:   Kaya de Barbaro, University of Texas at Austin

Mama tried: Contingent responding to distress does not increase rate of real-time soothing in infants high in negative emotionality

S8.iii:   Niyantri Ravindran, The Pennsylvania State University

Parental structuring of toddler negative emotion predicts children’s use of distraction longitudinally

S8.iv: Maria Gartstein, Washington State University (Discussant)

S8 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.9  The role of action understanding in early sociomoral cognition

Chair: Brandon Woo, Harvard University

S9.i  Denis Tatone, Central European University

Twelve-month-old infants use payoff information to disambiguate the goals of agents involved in a joint activity

S9.ii:   Fransisca Ting, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

16-month-old infants perceive irrational individuals as having reduced moral rights

S9.iii:   Brandon Woo, Harvard University

Social cognition in context: Infants’ evaluations of helping in means-end sequences

S9.iv:   Elizabeth Enright, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Toddlers consider others’ goals when helping others

S.9 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.10  The I in team: Individual differences in infancy shape social competence and prosociality

Chair: Jess Aitken, University of Auckland

S10.i:   Robert Hepach, Leipzig University

Children’s positive emotions following helping others and seeing others being helped: Evidence for a developmental shift

S10.ii :   Jess Aitken, University of Auckland

Temperament and cooperative ability in infancy: Are effects of temperament mediated through children’s social behaviour during cooperative tasks?

S10.iii:   Amanda Brandone, Lehigh University

Developmental pathways from infant social cognition to later prosocial behavior and theory of mind

S10.iv:   Moritz Köster, Freie Universität Berlin

A developmental systems approach to early helping behavior

S.10 Q&A: Robert Hepach, Amanda Brandone & Moritz Köster will be available for questions during Congress Proceedings 1 (BST), with Amanda Brandone and Jess Aitken available for questions during both Congress Proceedings 1 (BST) and 2 (PDT)
 

Day 2: July 7

11:00-12:30  Poster Session 2


 

12:30-14:00 Symposium Sessions

 

S.11  The origins of causal thought

Chair: Jonathan Kominsky, Rutgers University – Newark

S11.i:   Deon Benton, Brown University

Stop in the name of contact: How infants learn about the causal properties of people and objects

S11.ii:   Samantha Wood, Indiana University

Reverse engineering the origins of causal knowledge

S11.iii:   Katarina Begus, Rutgers University – Newark

Not all information is created equal: Investigating infants’ sensitivity to confounded information in a causal reasoning task

S11.iv:   Jonathan Kominsky, Rutgers University – Newark

Disconnected causal representations in the first year of life

S11 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

S.12 The structure and function of biobehavioral synchrony in early development

Chair: Bennett Bertenthal, Indiana University

S12.i:   Elizabeth daSilva, Indiana University-Purdue University Columbus

Infant-mother physiological synchrony moderates infants’ self-regulation

S12.ii:   Stefanie Höhl, University of Vienna

Tuned in: Neural synchrony in mother-infant dyads

S12.iii:   Elise Piazza, Princeton University

Neural synchrony predicts novel word learning from storybooks

S12.iv:   Megan Whitehorn, UEL

Parental frontal brain activity tracks infant attention during shared play

S12 Q&A: live questions taking place during both Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) and 2 (PDT) 

 

S.13 Rhythm perception in infants: Neural, pupillary, and motor entrainment to speech

Chair: Judit Gervain, Université Paris Descartes

S13.i:   Tineke M. Snijders, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

Tracking speech rhythm in the 7.5 month old infant brain is related to word segmentation performance at 9 months

S13.ii:   Áine Ní Choisdealbha, University of Cambridge

Changes in neural rhythmic entrainment during the first year of life

S13.iii:   Alan Langus, University of Potsdam

Individual variability in pupillary entrainment predicts speech segmentation with prosodic and statistical cues in infancy

S13.iv:   Natalie Boll-Avetisyan, University of Potsdam

Infants show spontaneous motor entrainment while listening to rhythmic speech

 

S.14 Understanding infants’ lives by the use of smartphones: Experience sampling and ambulatory assessment

Chair: Stephanie Wermelinger, University of Zurich

S14.i:   Sophie von Stumm, University of York

Using digital technologies for assessing infants’ cognitive development in real-time

S14.ii:   Nivedita Mani, University of Goettingen

Online testing technology for infant touchscreen and looking time tasks

S14.iii:   Stephanie Wermelinger, University of Zurich

Identifiying dynamic developmental processes during infancy by using the WeltentdeckerApp

S14 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

12:30-17:15  Poster Session 2 (available on demand)


 

14:00-15:30 Symposium Sessions

Invited Session: Secondary Data analysis of existing data files (pre-recorded)

Michael Thomas, Birkbeck, University of London

Alex Cristia, CNRS

Marije Verhage, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam

Sarah Jensen, Boston College (moderator)

 

Invited Session: Online solutions for data collection (pre-recorded)

Rhodri Cusack, Trinity College Dublin

Emily Jones & Elena Throm, Birkbeck, University of London

Caspar Addyman, Goldsmiths, University of London

Natasha Kirkham, Birkbeck, University of London (moderator)


 

15:45-17:15  Symposium Sessions

 

S.15  Brain & Behavior: New insights into neural correlates of infant emotion regulation

Chair: Courtney Filippi, University of Maryland

S15.i:   Elina Thomas, Oregon Health and Science University

Newborn amygdala connectivity to prefrontal and sensory regions is associated with early emerging regulatory behavior

S15.ii:   Courtney Filippi, University of Maryland

Associations between amygdala connectivity and negative reactive temperament

S15.iii:   Chad Sylvester, Washington University

Maternal Anxiety and Neonatal Brain Response to Novel Sounds as Assessed with fMRI

S15 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.16  Insights from outside the lab: Modeling observational data to understand language learning

Chair: Mika Braginsky, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

S16.i:   Eva Portelance, Stanford University

Using neural network language models to predict age of acquisition for early vocabulary

S16.ii:   Stephan Meylan, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Characterizing child-directed listening with corpus and model-based analyses

S16.iii:   Mika Braginsky, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Characterizing the relationship between lexical and morphological development

S16.iv:   Georgia Loukatou, CNRS, PSL University

Assessing cross-linguistic viability of infant word segmentation models

S.16 Q&A: Georia Loukatou will be available for questions during Congress Proceedings 1 (BST), with Eva Portelance, Stephan Meylan & Mika Braginsky available for questions during both Congress Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.17 How multiple exemplars help infants and young children extend their knowledge

Chair: Jane Childers, Trinity University

S17.i:   Susan Graham, University of Calgary

Multiple exemplars facilitate 9-month-olds’ property generalizations

S17.ii:   Jane Childers, Trinity University

Extending verbs to new events: Does the comparison of events over delays help?

S17.iii:   Christina Schonberg, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Why do multiple examples help children learn words? The roles of aggregation, decontextualization, and memory dynamics

S17.iv:  Scott Johnson, University of California, Los Angeles

Discussant

S.17 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

S.18  Child evocative effects in the context of parenting across developmental systems: A behavioral and neurophysiological perspective

Chair: Diane Lickenbrock, Western Kentucky University

S18.i:   Kayla Brown, The Pennsylvania State University

Difficult temperament profiles and externalizing behaviors: The moderating effects on harsh parenting and dyadic inconsistency

S18.ii:   Berenice Anaya, Penn State University

Maternal anxiety and infant negative affect trajectories: The role of neural and environmental factors during infancy

S18.iii:   Diane Lickenbrock, Western Kentucky University

Infant physiological regulation with mothers and fathers: The effects of infant temperament and parent factors

S18 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.19  Fair’s fair?: Intentions and relationships impact infants’ expectations about fairness and preferences for fair individuals

Chair: Zoe Liberman, University of California Santa Barbara

S19.i:   Luca Surian, University of Trento

Preverbal infants’ intention-based evaluations of fairness

S19.ii:   Anna-Elisabeth Baumann, University of Chicago

Infants’ reactions to resource distribution outcomes as a function of ingroup/outgroup manipulations and language status

S19.iii:   Lin Bian, Cornell University

Do 4-month-olds take into account group membership when judging fair outcomes?

S19.iv:   Zoe Liberman, University of California Santa Barbara

Infants predict that distributors will act partially towards their friends

S.19 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

Day 3: July 8

11:00-12:30  Poster Session 3


 

12:30-14:00  Symposium Sessions

 

S.20  Enhancing our understanding of social cognition in infancy through cutting-edge technology and individualized approaches

Chair: Giorgia Bussu, Radboud University Medical Center

S20.i:   Maheen Siddiqui, Birkbeck, University of London

Spatially resolved measures of cytochrome-c-oxidase during functional activation in infants

S20.ii:   David López Pérez, Institute of Psychology, Polish Academy of Sciences

Efficiency of scanning in infancy in the presence and absence of faces differentially predicts expressive and receptive language in toddlers

S20.iii:   Giorgia Bussu, Radboud University Medical Center

An individual approach to understand the nature of face processing in early autism

S20.iv:   Anna Gui, Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development, Birkbeck College, University of London

Neuroadaptive optimization to study how neural signatures of attention to faces in infants relate to later autism

S.20 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.21 Not just the linguistic factor! Associations between maternal child-directed speech and cognitive and socio-emotional competencies

Chair: Maria Spinelli, University G. D’Annunzio Chieti-Pescara

Discussant: Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, Temple University

S21.i:   Prachi Shah, University of Michigan

Parent language stimulation, parent sensitivity and socioeconomic status: Associations with curiosity

S21.ii:   Chiara Suttora, University of Bologna

The role of maternal verbal input in the emergence of mental lexicon in early childhood

S21.iii:   Maria Spinelli, University G. D’Annunzio Chieti-Pescara

Talk to me mum! The longitudinal effects of prosodic and linguistic characteristics of infant directed speech on the development of child attention and emotion regulation

S21.iv:   Brianna McMillan, Temple University

Fluid, back-and-forth conversation sets a foundation for infant executive function skills

S.21 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

S.22 Tips, tricks, and statistics: Recommendations for improving infant research methods

Chair: Lena V. Kremin, Concordia University

S22.i:   Esther Schott, Concordia University

Tools for transparency: Practical tips for sharing your research

S22.ii:   Lena V. Kremin, Concordia University

Let the data do the talking: Optimizing visualizations for transparency and readability

S22.iii:   Nivedita Mani, University of Goettingen

Bayesian sequential testing in developmental research

S22.iv:   Alejandrina Cristia, ENS, EHESS, CNRS, PSL University

Using long-form recordings to study infants’ speech input and outcomes: Opportunities and challenges

S22 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.23 Building contingency: How caregiver and child characteristics relate to interactions that support infant language

Chair: Lillian Masek, Temple University

S23.i:   Rebecca Alper, Temple University

One is not enough: Understanding variability in early language interaction quality using parent self-efficacy and developmental knowledge profiles

S23.ii:   Lillian Masek, Temple University

Building fluid and connected conversation: How caregiver speech differentially relates to interaction quality

S23.iii:   Rufan Luo, Rutgers University, Camden

Maternal question use and child language outcomes: The moderating role of SES and children’s concurrent vocabulary

S.23 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

12:30-17:00  Poster Session 3 (available on demand)


 

14:00-15:15 Symposium Sessions

Invited Session: Modeling development from existing data (pre-recorded)

Gert Westermann, Lancaster University

Jochen Triesch, Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies

Katherine Twomey, University of Manchester (moderator)

Recorded Webinar: Data Repositories: Resources for studying development (75 minutes)

Karen Adolph, New York University

Marisa Casillas, Max Planck Institute

Brian MacWhinney, Carnegie Mellon University

Caitlin Fausey, University of Oregon (moderator)


 

15:30-17:00  Symposium Sessions

 

S.24  Novel technologies to assess language development in infants

Chair: Julien Mayor, University of Oslo

S24.i:   Virginia Marchman, Stanford University

Using web-based platforms to expand the socioeconomic reach of parent report measures of vocabulary development

S24.ii:   Julien Mayor, University of Oslo

BabyLex-IRT: Estimating early vocabulary sizes using a Bayesian-inspired item-response theory approach

S24.iii:   Camila Scaff, University of Zurich

Socio-economic status and word comprehension in early childhood: A study in a low inequality setting and a meta-analytic review

S24.iv:   Amanda Seidl, Purdue University

The development of canonical babble in a crosslinguistic and cross-cultural corpus

S24 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.25:  Embracing new technologies to quantify early learning environments

Chair: Sara Schroer, Indiana University

S25.i:   Sara Schroer, Indiana University

Hands-on learning: Toddler’s multimodal attention at naming moments leads to successful word learning

S25.ii:   George Kachergis, Stanford University

Automatically detecting children’s visual access to social information in egocentric videos

S25.iii:   Marisa Casillas, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

The linguistic landscapes of learning in two small-scale societies

S25.iv:   Mira Nencheva, Princeton University

Analyzing emotion in language input: Caregivers’ cues to valence support toddlers’ learning of emotion words

S.25 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) and Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.26 Updates from the ManyBabies Consortium: Four collaborative replications of important findings in infancy research

Chair: Michael Frank, Stanford University

S26.i:   Angeline Sin Mei Tsui, Stanford University

ManyBabies 1B: Testing bilinguals’ preference for infant-directed speech

S26.ii:   Dora Kampis, University of Copenhagen

ManyBabies 2: Theory of mind in infancy

S26.iii:   Ingmar Visser, University of Amsterdam

ManyBabies 3: Infant rule learning: a multi-lab replication study

S26.iv:   Kelsey Lucca, Arizona State University

ManyBabies 4: A large-scale, multi-lab, coordinated replication study of infants’ social evaluations

S26 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.27  Real-world interactions in Real Time: Moment-to-moment dynamics of parent-infant joint engagement in naturalistic contexts

Chair: Catalina Suarez-Rivera, New York University

S27.i:   Chen Yu, Indiana University

Multiple sensorimotor pathways to parent-infant coordinated attention in naturalistic toy play

S27.ii:   Betina Karshaleva, University of California, San Diego

Infant vocalizations and maternal speech in naturalistic play: Contingencies from 4 to 12 months

S27.iii:   Catalina Suarez-Rivera, New York University

Everyday joint engagement: Coupling of the mothers body with the infants manual actions

S27.iv:   Jacob Schatz, New York University

Playing and learning together: Spontaneous joint engagement scaffolds infant play at home

S27 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.28  Exploring the circumstances in which infants attribute dispositions to agents

Chair: Megan Pronovost, California State University, Fresno

S28.i:   You-jung Choi, Harvard University

Three-month-old infants’ understanding of a human agent’s preference

S28.ii:   Su-hua Wang, University of California, Santa Cruz

Self-experience scaffolds infants’ reasoning about preference

S28.iii:   Lin Bian, Cornell University

8-month-olds attribute, and expect others to attribute, strong preferences to agents

S28.iv:   Megan Pronovost, California State University, Fresno

20-month-old infants’ attribution of behavioral dispositions to agents

S.28 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

Day 4: July 9

11:00-12:30  Poster Session 4


 

12:30-14:00  Symposium Sessions

 

S.29  Integrating computational and neuroimaging methods to investigate infant cognitive development

Chair: Laurie Bayet, American University

S29.i:   Benjamin Zinszer, Princeton University

Decoding representations of familiar objects in young infants using fNIRS

S29.ii:   Laurie Bayet, American University

Time-course and properties of higher-order visual representations in the infant brain

S29.iii:   Rhodri Cusack, Trinity College Dublin

Deep neural networks as a model of learning during the helpless period of infancy

S29.iv:   Nicholas Turk-Browne, Yale University

Adult-grade cognitive neuroscience in infants

S29 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.30 The reciprocal roles of parents and children in organizing learning opportunities in dyadic interaction

Chair: Steven Elmlinger, Cornell University

Discussant: Michael Goldstein, Cornell University

S30.i:   Miriam Langeloh, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences

Are you like me? Contingent adult-infant interactions in a naturalistic dual-EEG paradigm

S30.ii:   Steven Elmlinger, Cornell University

The development of prelinguistic vocal sequences: implications for early communication and language

S30.iii:   Sara Schroer, Indiana University

Toddler vocalizations shape the structure of parent-child interactions

S30.iv:   Katharina Rohlfing, Paderborn University

Do maternal vocalizations scaffold children to take up an active role in peekaboo routine?

S.30 Q&A:  All presenters available to take questions during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST). Steven Elmlinger, Sara Schroer, and Katharina Rolfing are available during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT). Discussant: Michael Goldstein is available for both Q&A sessions

 

S.31 Fine-grained environmental data illuminate the process of language learning

Chair: Daniel Swingley, University of Pennsylvania

S31.i  Daniel Swingley, University of Pennsylvania

How learning word-forms could guide infants to phonetic categories: New evidence from English

S31.ii:   Catherine Tamis-LeMonda, New York University

The food for thought: Unpacking the everyday language experiences of infants

S31.iii:   Chen Yu, Indiana University

Rethinking input: The infant’s view challenges the problem of referential uncertainty in early word learning

S31.iv:   Emmanuel Dupoux, EHESS

Reverse engineering early language acquisition: Can machine learning help?

S31 Q&A: live questions taking place with all speakers during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST), with some speakers being available during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.32 What can video coding tell us about infant development? Methodological examples and new results from two preterm infant cohorts

Chair: Sue Fletcher-Watson, University of Edinburgh

S32.i:   Bethan Dean, University of Edinburgh

Longitudinal assessment of social cognition in infants born preterm using eye-tracking and parent-child play

S32.ii:   Sinead O’Carroll, University of Edinburgh

Frequency and type of parental gesture during parent-child play is influenced by socioeconomic status and gestational age at birth

S32.iii:   Lorna Ginnell, University of Edinburgh

Reduced emotional response to the still-face paradigm in preterm infants

S.32 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.33 Parent-infant interaction styles in diverse populations and their impact on infant development

Chair: Sarah Lloyd-Fox, Cambridge University

S33.i:   Bosiljka Milosavljevic, Birkbeck, University of London

Mother-infant interactions, maternal mental health and infant cognitive outcomes in The Gambia

S33.ii:   Ciara Kelly, University of Sheffield

The communication of deaf infants with hearing parents

S33.iii:   Evelyne Mercure, Goldsmiths, University of London

Deaf mothers and their hearing infants: Social interaction, maternal sensitivity and language development

S33.iv:   Atsushi Senju, Birkbeck, University of London

Development of social attention and communication in infants of blind parents

S.33 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

12:30-17:00  Poster Session 4 (available on demand)


 

14:00-15:30 Symposium Sessions

 

Invited Session: Solutions for studying early language development (pre-recorded)

Katie Alcock, Lancaster University

Mike Frank, Stanford

Elizabeth Norton, Northwestern

Jessica Horst, University of Sussex (moderator)

Recorded Webinar: Stress and Development live live webinar (75 minutes)

Marion van den Heuvel, Tilburg University

Dima Amso, Brown University

Natasha Kirkham, Birkbeck, University of London

Brittney Chere, Birkbeck, University of London (moderator)


 

15:30-17:00  Symposium Sessions

 

S.34  Parent-infant interactions and language development in infants with communication disorders

Chair: Yuanyuan Wang, Ohio State University

S34.i :   Yuanyuan Wang, Ohio State University

The effects of hearing loss on the social feedback loop in infants with cochlear implants

S34.ii:   Girija Kadlaskar, Purdue University

Caregiver touch-speech communication and infant responses in 12-month-olds at high risk for autism spectrum disorder

S34.iii:   John Bunce, California State University East Bay

Why do I keep repeating myself? Exploring how parental assumptions of children’s comprehension effects word repetition patterns

S34.iv:   Derek Houston, The Ohio State University

Parent-infant interactions and word-learning skills in deaf infants with cochlear implants

S34 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.35  Novel approaches to electroencephalogram (EEG) lateralization: Beyond traditional asymmetry

Chair: Maria Gartstein, Washington State University

S35.i:   Maria Gartstein, Washington State University

EEG frontal asymmetry changes during emotion-eliciting tasks and parent-child interaction dynamics

S35.ii:   Ross Vanderwert, Cardiff University

Individual differences in frontal asymmetry while viewing emotion faces: A capability model approach

S35.iii:   Martha Ann Bell, Virginia Tech

Predictors of level of negative affect after arm restraint at 5 months

S35.iv:   Nancy Jones, Florida Atlantic University

Infant neurophysiological patterns and temperament are linked to maternal depressive symptoms

S.35 Q&A:  Ross Vanderwert will be available for questions during Congress Proceedings 1 (BST), with Maria Gartstein, Martha Ann Bell and Nancy Jones available for questions during Congress Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.36 Learning ‘hard words’: The role of conceptual representations when the tough gets tougher

Chair: Laura Lakusta, Montclair State University

S36.i:   Nicolò Cesana Arlotti, Johns Hopkins University

An investigation of the origins of logical quantification: Infant’s (and adult’s) representations of exhaustivity in collective or individual complex actions

S36.ii:   Ariel Starr, University of Washington

Spatial metaphor facilitates word learning

S36.iii:   Laura Lakusta, Montclair State University

Getting support for ‘support’: The privileging of ‘Support-From-Below’ in early spatial language acquisition

S.36 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

S.37 Cultural differences in mind-mindedness and infant-mother interaction

Chair: Elizabeth Meins, University of York

S37.i:   Catherine McMahon, Macquarie University

Cross-cultural comparison of maternal mind-mindedness among Australian and Chinese mothers of toddlers

S37.ii:   Yujin Lee, University of York

How does culture and empathy relate to mothers’ mind-mindedness?

S37.iii:  Nao Fujita, University of Cambridge

A cross-cultural comparison of maternal mind-mindedness and speech characteristics between Japan and the UK

S37.iv:   Katie Slocombe, University of York

Cross-cultural differences in mother-infant play behaviour

S.37 Q&A:  Katie Slocombe, Nao Fujita and Yujin Lee will be available for questions during Congress Proceedings 1 (BST), with Cathy McMahon being available for questions during Congress Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.38  Better safe than sorry: Infants’ use of social information to reason and learn about threat

Chair: Shari Liu, Harvard University

S38.i:   Shari Liu, Harvard University

Dangerous ground: Thirteen-month-old infants are sensitive to peril in other people’s actions

S38.ii:   Camille Rioux, Max Planck Institute for Human Development

Social information reduces infants’ avoidance of plants

S38.iii:   Tobias Grossmann, University of Virginia

Friend or foe? Impression formation in the human infant brain

S38.iv:   Zoe Liberman, University of California Santa Barbara

Not all negative emotions are equal: Infants selectively attend to threat

S.38 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

*Sessions available on demand next day

Day 1: July 6

14:00-15:30  Poster Session 1


 

15:30-17:00  Symposium Sessions

 

S.1  Early language across-cultures: Input, language processes and outcome measures

Chair: Laia Fibla, University of East Anglia

S1.i:   Marisa Casillas, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

Day-wide patterns in the use of child-directed speech in two non-Western, subsistence farming communities

S1.ii:   Camila Scaff,  University of Zurich

Exploring conversational turns and partners among Tsimane forager-horticulturalists

S1.iii:   Alejandrina Cristia, CNRS, PSL University

Spontaneous vocalizations from birth to age four: Insights from a mega-analysis of 13,785 hours of audio

S1.iv:   Laia Fibla, University of East Anglia

Early language processing and language exposure across-cultures: UK and India

S1 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) with some speakers being available during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.2 Environmental influences on infant attention: A global perspective

Chair: Sarah Lloyd-Fox, University of Cambridge

S2.i:   Samantha McCann, King’s College London

Undernutrition in infancy impacts early brain development in The Gambia: An fNIRS study

S2.ii:   Annie Brandes-Aitken, New York University

Contributions of cumulative parent cortisol to the neural underpinnings of infant attention and emotion regulation

S2.iii:   Sam Wass, University of East London

Physiological stress, sustained attention and cognitive engagement in 12-month-old infants from urban environments

S2 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.3 Investigating the relationship between representing the self and the other in early development

Chair: Victoria Southgate, University of Copenhagen

S3.i:   Chiara Bulgarelli, University College London

The role of self-awareness in selective facial mimicry of native over foreign speakers

S3.ii:   Dora Kampis, University of Copenhagen

The mapping of others to oneself in 16-26-old infants

S3.iii:   Josephine Ross, University of Dundee

Autocentric or allocentric? Exploring the co-development of self-representation and positive social behavior

S3.iv:   Milica Nikolic, University of Amsterdam

Implicit self-recognition in infancy predicts self-conscious emotional reactivity in childhood

 

S.4 Early markers for neurodevelopmental disorders: Towards the identification of trajectories to atypical cognitive outcomes

Chairs: Viola Macchi Cassia, University of Milano-Bicocca & Chiara Cantiani, Scientific Institute, IRCCS Medea

S4.i:   Valeria Costanzo, IRCCS Stella Maris Foundation

Social and non-social early markers of ASD: The relationship between disengagement of attention and joint attention in high-risk siblings at 12 months of life

S4.ii:   Valentina Riva, Scientific Institute, IRCCS Medea

Atypical ERP responses to multisensory integration in infants at risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder

S4.iii:   Roberta Bettoni, University of Milano-Bicocca

Visual implicit learning abilities in infants at familial risk for Development Language Disorder

S4.iv:   Gaia Scherif, Oxford University

Understanding variable outcomes in genetic syndromes: The importance of early developmental phenotyping

S4 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.5 The rhythm of our heart and mind: Neurophysiological responses to communicative rhythms in parent-infant interactions

Chair: Trinh Nguyen, University of Vienna

S5.i:   Trinh Nguyen, University of Vienna

The role of physiological synchrony for attachment

S5.ii:   Christina Schätz, University of Vienna

Effects of maternal infant-directed singing on infant physiological arousal

S5.iii:   Ira Marriott Haresign, The University of East London

Mutual gaze leads to phase reorganization and concomitant short-term increases in interpersonal neural synchrony

S5.iv: Shir Atzil, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Discussion

S5 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

15:30-20:00  Poster Session 1 (available on demand)


17:00-17:30  Welcoming remarks with ICIS President Lisa Oakes


17:30-18:30 Symposium Sessions

Invited Session: Solutions for studying development in clinical settings (pre-recorded)

Bridgette Kelleher, Purdue University

Evelyne Mercure, Goldsmiths, University of London

Susan Rivera, University of California Davis (moderator)

 

Recorded Webinar: How to have effective collaborations: Advice from the ManyBabies team (60 minutes)

Christina Bergmann, Max Planck Institute

Kiley Hamlin, University of British Columbia

Krista Byers-Heinlein, Concordia University

Casey Lew-Williams, Princeton (moderator)


 

18:30-20:00  Symposium Sessions

 

S.6  Timing is everything: The temporal dynamics of labeling in typical and atypical language development

Chair: Jill Lany, University of Liverpool

S6.i:   Jill Lany, University of Liverpool

The temporal dynamics of labeling shape object recognition

S6.ii:   Michael Goldstein, Cornell University

Relative contributions of infant-directed speech and motion when learning new words

S6.iii:   Madhavilatha Maganti, Ashoka University

Maternal synchronous gesture adaptations during object naming to term and preterm infants: A longitudinal study

S6.iv:   Chi-hsin Chen, The Ohio State University

Children’s hearing loss affects the synchrony between parents’ object naming and children’s attention to objects in parent-child interactions

 

S.7  Individual differences in attentional control and executive functions in the first two years of life

Chair: Alexandra Hendry, University of Oxford

S7.i:   Maria Rosario Rueda, University of Granada

Early development of the executive attention network in infancy

S7.ii:   Martha Ann Bell, Virginia Tech

Monthly development of cognitive and attention inhibition in the first year

S7.iii:   Alexandra Hendry, University of Oxford

Inhibitory control at 10 and 16 months on the A-not-B task and the Early Childhood Inhibitory Touchscreen Task

S7 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.8 Parent and child contributions to emotion regulation: Beyond main effects to complex developmental pathways

Chair: Kaya de Barbaro, University of Texas at Austin

S8.i:   Lauren Bailes, University of North Carolina Greensboro

Mother and infant contributions to infant negative emotionality over time

S8.ii:   Kaya de Barbaro, University of Texas at Austin

Mama tried: Contingent responding to distress does not increase rate of real-time soothing in infants high in negative emotionality

S8.iii:   Niyantri Ravindran, The Pennsylvania State University

Parental structuring of toddler negative emotion predicts children’s use of distraction longitudinally

S8.iv: Maria Gartstein, Washington State University (Discussant)

S8 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.9  The role of action understanding in early sociomoral cognition

Chair: Brandon Woo, Harvard University

S9.i  Denis Tatone, Central European University

Twelve-month-old infants use payoff information to disambiguate the goals of agents involved in a joint activity

S9.ii:   Fransisca Ting, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

16-month-old infants perceive irrational individuals as having reduced moral rights

S9.iii:   Brandon Woo, Harvard University

Social cognition in context: Infants’ evaluations of helping in means-end sequences

S9.iv:   Elizabeth Enright, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Toddlers consider others’ goals when helping others

S.9 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.10  The I in team: Individual differences in infancy shape social competence and prosociality

Chair: Jess Aitken, University of Auckland

S10.i:   Robert Hepach, Leipzig University

Children’s positive emotions following helping others and seeing others being helped: Evidence for a developmental shift

S10.ii :   Jess Aitken, University of Auckland

Temperament and cooperative ability in infancy: Are effects of temperament mediated through children’s social behaviour during cooperative tasks?

S10.iii:   Amanda Brandone, Lehigh University

Developmental pathways from infant social cognition to later prosocial behavior and theory of mind

S10.iv:   Moritz Köster, Freie Universität Berlin

A developmental systems approach to early helping behavior

S.10 Q&A: Robert Hepach, Amanda Brandone & Moritz Köster will be available for questions during Congress Proceedings 1 (BST), with Amanda Brandone and Jess Aitken available for questions during both Congress Proceedings 1 (BST) and 2 (PDT)

Day 2: July 7

14:00-15:30  Poster Session 2


 

15:30-17:00 Symposium Sessions

 

S.11  The origins of causal thought

Chair: Jonathan Kominsky, Rutgers University – Newark

S11.i:   Deon Benton, Brown University

Stop in the name of contact: How infants learn about the causal properties of people and objects

S11.ii:   Samantha Wood, Indiana University

Reverse engineering the origins of causal knowledge

S11.iii:   Katarina Begus, Rutgers University – Newark

Not all information is created equal: Investigating infants’ sensitivity to confounded information in a causal reasoning task

S11.iv:   Jonathan Kominsky, Rutgers University – Newark

Disconnected causal representations in the first year of life

S11 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

S.12 The structure and function of biobehavioral synchrony in early development

Chair: Bennett Bertenthal, Indiana University

S12.i:   Elizabeth daSilva, Indiana University-Purdue University Columbus

Infant-mother physiological synchrony moderates infants’ self-regulation

S12.ii:   Stefanie Höhl, University of Vienna

Tuned in: Neural synchrony in mother-infant dyads

S12.iii:   Elise Piazza, Princeton University

Neural synchrony predicts novel word learning from storybooks

S12.iv:   Megan Whitehorn, UEL

Parental frontal brain activity tracks infant attention during shared play

S12 Q&A: live questions taking place during both Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) and 2 (PDT) 

 

S.13 Rhythm perception in infants: Neural, pupillary, and motor entrainment to speech

Chair: Judit Gervain, Université Paris Descartes

S13.i:   Tineke M. Snijders, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

Tracking speech rhythm in the 7.5 month old infant brain is related to word segmentation performance at 9 months

S13.ii:   Áine Ní Choisdealbha, University of Cambridge

Changes in neural rhythmic entrainment during the first year of life

S13.iii:   Alan Langus, University of Potsdam

Individual variability in pupillary entrainment predicts speech segmentation with prosodic and statistical cues in infancy

S13.iv:   Natalie Boll-Avetisyan, University of Potsdam

Infants show spontaneous motor entrainment while listening to rhythmic speech

 

S.14 Understanding infants’ lives by the use of smartphones: Experience sampling and ambulatory assessment

Chair: Stephanie Wermelinger, University of Zurich

S14.i:   Sophie von Stumm, University of York

Using digital technologies for assessing infants’ cognitive development in real-time

S14.ii:   Nivedita Mani, University of Goettingen

Online testing technology for infant touchscreen and looking time tasks

S14.iii:   Stephanie Wermelinger, University of Zurich

Identifiying dynamic developmental processes during infancy by using the WeltentdeckerApp

S14 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

15:30-20:15  Poster Session 2 (available on demand)


 

17:00-18:30  Symposium Sessions

Invited Session: Secondary Data analysis of existing data files (90 minutes with live Q&A)

Michael Thomas, Birkbeck, University of London

Alex Cristia, CNRS

Marije Verhage, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam

Sarah Jensen, Boston College (moderator)

 

Invited Session: Online solutions for data collection (90 minutes minutes with live Q&A)

Rhodri Cusack, Trinity College Dublin

Emily Jones & Elena Throm, Birkbeck, University of London

Caspar Addyman, Goldsmiths, University of London

Natasha Kirkham, Birkbeck, University of London (moderator)


 

18:45-20:15  Symposium Sessions

 

S.15  Brain & Behavior: New insights into neural correlates of infant emotion regulation

Chair: Courtney Filippi, University of Maryland

S15.i:   Elina Thomas, Oregon Health and Science University

Newborn amygdala connectivity to prefrontal and sensory regions is associated with early emerging regulatory behavior

S15.ii:   Courtney Filippi, University of Maryland

Associations between amygdala connectivity and negative reactive temperament

S15.iii:   Chad Sylvester, Washington University

Maternal Anxiety and Neonatal Brain Response to Novel Sounds as Assessed with fMRI

S15 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.16  Insights from outside the lab: Modeling observational data to understand language learning

Chair: Mika Braginsky, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

S16.i:   Eva Portelance, Stanford University

Using neural network language models to predict age of acquisition for early vocabulary

S16.ii:   Stephan Meylan, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Characterizing child-directed listening with corpus and model-based analyses

S16.iii:   Mika Braginsky, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Characterizing the relationship between lexical and morphological development

S16.iv:   Georgia Loukatou, CNRS, PSL University

Assessing cross-linguistic viability of infant word segmentation models

S.16 Q&A: Georia Loukatou will be available for questions during Congress Proceedings 1 (BST), with Eva Portelance, Stephan Meylan & Mika Braginsky available for questions during both Congress Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.17 How multiple exemplars help infants and young children extend their knowledge

Chair: Jane Childers, Trinity University

S17.i:   Susan Graham, University of Calgary

Multiple exemplars facilitate 9-month-olds’ property generalizations

S17.ii:   Jane Childers, Trinity University

Extending verbs to new events: Does the comparison of events over delays help?

S17.iii:   Christina Schonberg, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Why do multiple examples help children learn words? The roles of aggregation, decontextualization, and memory dynamics

S17.iv:  Scott Johnson, University of California, Los Angeles

Discussant

S.17 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

S.18  Child evocative effects in the context of parenting across developmental systems: A behavioral and neurophysiological perspective

Chair: Diane Lickenbrock, Western Kentucky University

S18.i:   Kayla Brown, The Pennsylvania State University

Difficult temperament profiles and externalizing behaviors: The moderating effects on harsh parenting and dyadic inconsistency

S18.ii:   Berenice Anaya, Penn State University

Maternal anxiety and infant negative affect trajectories: The role of neural and environmental factors during infancy

S18.iii:   Diane Lickenbrock, Western Kentucky University

Infant physiological regulation with mothers and fathers: The effects of infant temperament and parent factors

S18 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.19  Fair’s fair?: Intentions and relationships impact infants’ expectations about fairness and preferences for fair individuals

Chair: Zoe Liberman, University of California Santa Barbara

S19.i:   Luca Surian, University of Trento

Preverbal infants’ intention-based evaluations of fairness

S19.ii:   Anna-Elisabeth Baumann, University of Chicago

Infants’ reactions to resource distribution outcomes as a function of ingroup/outgroup manipulations and language status

S19.iii:   Lin Bian, Cornell University

Do 4-month-olds take into account group membership when judging fair outcomes?

S19.iv:   Zoe Liberman, University of California Santa Barbara

Infants predict that distributors will act partially towards their friends

S.19 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

Day 3: July 8

14:00-15:30  Poster Session 3


 

15:30-17:00  Symposium Sessions

 

S.20  Enhancing our understanding of social cognition in infancy through cutting-edge technology and individualized approaches

Chair: Giorgia Bussu, Radboud University Medical Center

S20.i:   Maheen Siddiqui, Birkbeck, University of London

Spatially resolved measures of cytochrome-c-oxidase during functional activation in infants

S20.ii:   David López Pérez, Institute of Psychology, Polish Academy of Sciences

Efficiency of scanning in infancy in the presence and absence of faces differentially predicts expressive and receptive language in toddlers

S20.iii:   Giorgia Bussu, Radboud University Medical Center

An individual approach to understand the nature of face processing in early autism

S20.iv:   Anna Gui, Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development, Birkbeck College, University of London

Neuroadaptive optimization to study how neural signatures of attention to faces in infants relate to later autism

S.20 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.21 Not just the linguistic factor! Associations between maternal child-directed speech and cognitive and socio-emotional competencies

Chair: Maria Spinelli, University G. D’Annunzio Chieti-Pescara

Discussant: Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, Temple University

S21.i:   Prachi Shah, University of Michigan

Parent language stimulation, parent sensitivity and socioeconomic status: Associations with curiosity

S21.ii:   Chiara Suttora, University of Bologna

The role of maternal verbal input in the emergence of mental lexicon in early childhood

S21.iii:   Maria Spinelli, University G. D’Annunzio Chieti-Pescara

Talk to me mum! The longitudinal effects of prosodic and linguistic characteristics of infant directed speech on the development of child attention and emotion regulation

S21.iv:   Brianna McMillan, Temple University

Fluid, back-and-forth conversation sets a foundation for infant executive function skills

S.21 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

S.22 Tips, tricks, and statistics: Recommendations for improving infant research methods

Chair: Lena V. Kremin, Concordia University

S22.i:   Esther Schott, Concordia University

Tools for transparency: Practical tips for sharing your research

S22.ii:   Lena V. Kremin, Concordia University

Let the data do the talking: Optimizing visualizations for transparency and readability

S22.iii:   Nivedita Mani, University of Goettingen

Bayesian sequential testing in developmental research

S22.iv:   Alejandrina Cristia, ENS, EHESS, CNRS, PSL University

Using long-form recordings to study infants’ speech input and outcomes: Opportunities and challenges

S22 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.23 Building contingency: How caregiver and child characteristics relate to interactions that support infant language

Chair: Lillian Masek, Temple University

S23.i:   Rebecca Alper, Temple University

One is not enough: Understanding variability in early language interaction quality using parent self-efficacy and developmental knowledge profiles

S23.ii:   Lillian Masek, Temple University

Building fluid and connected conversation: How caregiver speech differentially relates to interaction quality

S23.iii:   Rufan Luo, Rutgers University, Camden

Maternal question use and child language outcomes: The moderating role of SES and children’s concurrent vocabulary

S.23 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

15:30-20:00  Poster Session 3 (available on demand)


 

17:00-18:15 Symposium Sessions

Invited Session: Modeling development from existing data (pre-recorded)

Gert Westermann, Lancaster University

Jochen Triesch, Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies

Katherine Twomey, University of Manchester (moderator)

Recorded Webinar: Data Repositories: Resources for studying development (75 minutes)

Karen Adolph, New York University

Marisa Casillas, Max Planck Institute

Brian MacWhinney, Carnegie Mellon University

Caitlin Fausey, University of Oregon (moderator)


 

18:30-20:00  Symposium Sessions

 

S.24  Novel technologies to assess language development in infants

Chair: Julien Mayor, University of Oslo

S24.i:   Virginia Marchman, Stanford University

Using web-based platforms to expand the socioeconomic reach of parent report measures of vocabulary development

S24.ii:   Julien Mayor, University of Oslo

BabyLex-IRT: Estimating early vocabulary sizes using a Bayesian-inspired item-response theory approach

S24.iii:   Camila Scaff, University of Zurich

Socio-economic status and word comprehension in early childhood: A study in a low inequality setting and a meta-analytic review

S24.iv:   Amanda Seidl, Purdue University

The development of canonical babble in a crosslinguistic and cross-cultural corpus

S24 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.25:  Embracing new technologies to quantify early learning environments

Chair: Sara Schroer, Indiana University

S25.i:   Sara Schroer, Indiana University

Hands-on learning: Toddler’s multimodal attention at naming moments leads to successful word learning

S25.ii:   George Kachergis, Stanford University

Automatically detecting children’s visual access to social information in egocentric videos

S25.iii:   Marisa Casillas, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

The linguistic landscapes of learning in two small-scale societies

S25.iv:   Mira Nencheva, Princeton University

Analyzing emotion in language input: Caregivers’ cues to valence support toddlers’ learning of emotion words

S.25 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) and Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.26 Updates from the ManyBabies Consortium: Four collaborative replications of important findings in infancy research

Chair: Michael Frank, Stanford University

S26.i:   Angeline Sin Mei Tsui, Stanford University

ManyBabies 1B: Testing bilinguals’ preference for infant-directed speech

S26.ii:   Dora Kampis, University of Copenhagen

ManyBabies 2: Theory of mind in infancy

S26.iii:   Ingmar Visser, University of Amsterdam

ManyBabies 3: Infant rule learning: a multi-lab replication study

S26.iv:   Kelsey Lucca, Arizona State University

ManyBabies 4: A large-scale, multi-lab, coordinated replication study of infants’ social evaluations

S26 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.27  Real-world interactions in Real Time: Moment-to-moment dynamics of parent-infant joint engagement in naturalistic contexts

Chair: Catalina Suarez-Rivera, New York University

S27.i:   Chen Yu, Indiana University

Multiple sensorimotor pathways to parent-infant coordinated attention in naturalistic toy play

S27.ii:   Betina Karshaleva, University of California, San Diego

Infant vocalizations and maternal speech in naturalistic play: Contingencies from 4 to 12 months

S27.iii:   Catalina Suarez-Rivera, New York University

Everyday joint engagement: Coupling of the mothers body with the infants manual actions

S27.iv:   Jacob Schatz, New York University

Playing and learning together: Spontaneous joint engagement scaffolds infant play at home

S27 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.28  Exploring the circumstances in which infants attribute dispositions to agents

Chair: Megan Pronovost, California State University, Fresno

S28.i:   You-jung Choi, Harvard University

Three-month-old infants’ understanding of a human agent’s preference

S28.ii:   Su-hua Wang, University of California, Santa Cruz

Self-experience scaffolds infants’ reasoning about preference

S28.iii:   Lin Bian, Cornell University

8-month-olds attribute, and expect others to attribute, strong preferences to agents

S28.iv:   Megan Pronovost, California State University, Fresno

20-month-old infants’ attribution of behavioral dispositions to agents

S.28 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

Day 4: July 9

14:00-15:30  Poster Session 4


 

15:30-17:00  Symposium Sessions

 

S.29  Integrating computational and neuroimaging methods to investigate infant cognitive development

Chair: Laurie Bayet, American University

S29.i:   Benjamin Zinszer, Princeton University

Decoding representations of familiar objects in young infants using fNIRS

S29.ii:   Laurie Bayet, American University

Time-course and properties of higher-order visual representations in the infant brain

S29.iii:   Rhodri Cusack, Trinity College Dublin

Deep neural networks as a model of learning during the helpless period of infancy

S29.iv:   Nicholas Turk-Browne, Yale University

Adult-grade cognitive neuroscience in infants

S29 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.30 The reciprocal roles of parents and children in organizing learning opportunities in dyadic interaction

Chair: Steven Elmlinger, Cornell University

Discussant: Michael Goldstein, Cornell University

S30.i:   Miriam Langeloh, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences

Are you like me? Contingent adult-infant interactions in a naturalistic dual-EEG paradigm

S30.ii:   Steven Elmlinger, Cornell University

The development of prelinguistic vocal sequences: implications for early communication and language

S30.iii:   Sara Schroer, Indiana University

Toddler vocalizations shape the structure of parent-child interactions

S30.iv:   Katharina Rohlfing, Paderborn University

Do maternal vocalizations scaffold children to take up an active role in peekaboo routine?

S.30 Q&A:  All presenters available to take questions during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST). Steven Elmlinger, Sara Schroer, and Katharina Rolfing are available during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT). Discussant: Michael Goldstein is available for both Q&A sessions

 

S.31 Fine-grained environmental data illuminate the process of language learning

Chair: Daniel Swingley, University of Pennsylvania

S31.i  Daniel Swingley, University of Pennsylvania

How learning word-forms could guide infants to phonetic categories: New evidence from English

S31.ii:   Catherine Tamis-LeMonda, New York University

The food for thought: Unpacking the everyday language experiences of infants

S31.iii:   Chen Yu, Indiana University

Rethinking input: The infant’s view challenges the problem of referential uncertainty in early word learning

S31.iv:   Emmanuel Dupoux, EHESS

Reverse engineering early language acquisition: Can machine learning help?

S31 Q&A: live questions taking place with all speakers during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST), with some speakers being available during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.32 What can video coding tell us about infant development? Methodological examples and new results from two preterm infant cohorts

Chair: Sue Fletcher-Watson, University of Edinburgh

S32.i:   Bethan Dean, University of Edinburgh

Longitudinal assessment of social cognition in infants born preterm using eye-tracking and parent-child play

S32.ii:   Sinead O’Carroll, University of Edinburgh

Frequency and type of parental gesture during parent-child play is influenced by socioeconomic status and gestational age at birth

S32.iii:   Lorna Ginnell, University of Edinburgh

Reduced emotional response to the still-face paradigm in preterm infants

S.32 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.33 Parent-infant interaction styles in diverse populations and their impact on infant development

Chair: Sarah Lloyd-Fox, Cambridge University

S33.i:   Bosiljka Milosavljevic, Birkbeck, University of London

Mother-infant interactions, maternal mental health and infant cognitive outcomes in The Gambia

S33.ii:   Ciara Kelly, University of Sheffield

The communication of deaf infants with hearing parents

S33.iii:   Evelyne Mercure, Goldsmiths, University of London

Deaf mothers and their hearing infants: Social interaction, maternal sensitivity and language development

S33.iv:   Atsushi Senju, Birkbeck, University of London

Development of social attention and communication in infants of blind parents

S.33 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

15:30-20:00  Poster Session 4 (available on demand)


 

17:00-18:30 Symposium Sessions

 

Invited Session: Solutions for studying early language development (pre-recorded)

Katie Alcock, Lancaster University

Mike Frank, Stanford

Elizabeth Norton, Northwestern

Jessica Horst, University of Sussex (moderator)

Recorded Webinar: Stress and Development live live webinar (pre-recorded)

Marion van den Heuvel, Tilburg University

Dima Amso, Brown University

Natasha Kirkham, Birkbeck, University of London

Brittney Chere, Birkbeck, University of London (moderator)


 

18:30-20:00  Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.34  Parent-infant interactions and language development in infants with communication disorders

Chair: Yuanyuan Wang, Ohio State University

S34.i :   Yuanyuan Wang, Ohio State University

The effects of hearing loss on the social feedback loop in infants with cochlear implants

S34.ii:   Girija Kadlaskar, Purdue University

Caregiver touch-speech communication and infant responses in 12-month-olds at high risk for autism spectrum disorder

S34.iii:   John Bunce, California State University East Bay

Why do I keep repeating myself? Exploring how parental assumptions of children’s comprehension effects word repetition patterns

S34.iv:   Derek Houston, The Ohio State University

Parent-infant interactions and word-learning skills in deaf infants with cochlear implants

S34 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.35  Novel approaches to electroencephalogram (EEG) lateralization: Beyond traditional asymmetry

Chair: Maria Gartstein, Washington State University

S35.i:   Maria Gartstein, Washington State University

EEG frontal asymmetry changes during emotion-eliciting tasks and parent-child interaction dynamics

S35.ii:   Ross Vanderwert, Cardiff University

Individual differences in frontal asymmetry while viewing emotion faces: A capability model approach

S35.iii:   Martha Ann Bell, Virginia Tech

Predictors of level of negative affect after arm restraint at 5 months

S35.iv:   Nancy Jones, Florida Atlantic University

Infant neurophysiological patterns and temperament are linked to maternal depressive symptoms

S.35 Q&A:  Ross Vanderwert will be available for questions during Congress Proceedings 1 (BST), with Maria Gartstein, Martha Ann Bell and Nancy Jones available for questions during Congress Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.36 Learning ‘hard words’: The role of conceptual representations when the tough gets tougher

Chair: Laura Lakusta, Montclair State University

S36.i:   Nicolò Cesana Arlotti, Johns Hopkins University

An investigation of the origins of logical quantification: Infant’s (and adult’s) representations of exhaustivity in collective or individual complex actions

S36.ii:   Ariel Starr, University of Washington

Spatial metaphor facilitates word learning

S36.iii:   Laura Lakusta, Montclair State University

Getting support for ‘support’: The privileging of ‘Support-From-Below’ in early spatial language acquisition

S.36 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

S.37 Cultural differences in mind-mindedness and infant-mother interaction

Chair: Elizabeth Meins, University of York

S37.i:   Catherine McMahon, Macquarie University

Cross-cultural comparison of maternal mind-mindedness among Australian and Chinese mothers of toddlers

S37.ii:   Yujin Lee, University of York

How does culture and empathy relate to mothers’ mind-mindedness?

S37.iii:  Nao Fujita, University of Cambridge

A cross-cultural comparison of maternal mind-mindedness and speech characteristics between Japan and the UK

S37.iv:   Katie Slocombe, University of York

Cross-cultural differences in mother-infant play behaviour

S.37 Q&A:  Katie Slocombe, Nao Fujita and Yujin Lee will be available for questions during Congress Proceedings 1 (BST), with Cathy McMahon being available for questions during Congress Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.38  Better safe than sorry: Infants’ use of social information to reason and learn about threat

Chair: Shari Liu, Harvard University

S38.i:   Shari Liu, Harvard University

Dangerous ground: Thirteen-month-old infants are sensitive to peril in other people’s actions

S38.ii:   Camille Rioux, Max Planck Institute for Human Development

Social information reduces infants’ avoidance of plants

S38.iii:   Tobias Grossmann, University of Virginia

Friend or foe? Impression formation in the human infant brain

S38.iv:   Zoe Liberman, University of California Santa Barbara

Not all negative emotions are equal: Infants selectively attend to threat

S.38 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

*Sessions available on demand next day

Day 1: July 6

19:00-20:30  Poster Session 1


 

20:30-22:00  Symposium Sessions

 

S.1  Early language across-cultures: Input, language processes and outcome measures

Chair: Laia Fibla, University of East Anglia

S1.i:   Marisa Casillas, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

Day-wide patterns in the use of child-directed speech in two non-Western, subsistence farming communities

S1.ii:   Camila Scaff,  University of Zurich

Exploring conversational turns and partners among Tsimane forager-horticulturalists

S1.iii:   Alejandrina Cristia, CNRS, PSL University

Spontaneous vocalizations from birth to age four: Insights from a mega-analysis of 13,785 hours of audio

S1.iv:   Laia Fibla, University of East Anglia

Early language processing and language exposure across-cultures: UK and India

S1 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) with some speakers being available during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.2 Environmental influences on infant attention: A global perspective

Chair: Sarah Lloyd-Fox, University of Cambridge

S2.i:   Samantha McCann, King’s College London

Undernutrition in infancy impacts early brain development in The Gambia: An fNIRS study

S2.ii:   Annie Brandes-Aitken, New York University

Contributions of cumulative parent cortisol to the neural underpinnings of infant attention and emotion regulation

S2.iii:   Sam Wass, University of East London

Physiological stress, sustained attention and cognitive engagement in 12-month-old infants from urban environments

S2 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.3 Investigating the relationship between representing the self and the other in early development

Chair: Victoria Southgate, University of Copenhagen

S3.i:   Chiara Bulgarelli, University College London

The role of self-awareness in selective facial mimicry of native over foreign speakers

S3.ii:   Dora Kampis, University of Copenhagen

The mapping of others to oneself in 16-26-old infants

S3.iii:   Josephine Ross, University of Dundee

Autocentric or allocentric? Exploring the co-development of self-representation and positive social behavior

S3.iv:   Milica Nikolic, University of Amsterdam

Implicit self-recognition in infancy predicts self-conscious emotional reactivity in childhood

 

S.4 Early markers for neurodevelopmental disorders: Towards the identification of trajectories to atypical cognitive outcomes

Chairs: Viola Macchi Cassia, University of Milano-Bicocca & Chiara Cantiani, Scientific Institute, IRCCS Medea

S4.i:   Valeria Costanzo, IRCCS Stella Maris Foundation

Social and non-social early markers of ASD: The relationship between disengagement of attention and joint attention in high-risk siblings at 12 months of life

S4.ii:   Valentina Riva, Scientific Institute, IRCCS Medea

Atypical ERP responses to multisensory integration in infants at risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder

S4.iii:   Roberta Bettoni, University of Milano-Bicocca

Visual implicit learning abilities in infants at familial risk for Development Language Disorder

S4.iv:   Gaia Scherif, Oxford University

Understanding variable outcomes in genetic syndromes: The importance of early developmental phenotyping

S4 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.5 The rhythm of our heart and mind: Neurophysiological responses to communicative rhythms in parent-infant interactions

Chair: Trinh Nguyen, University of Vienna

S5.i:   Trinh Nguyen, University of Vienna

The role of physiological synchrony for attachment

S5.ii:   Christina Schätz, University of Vienna

Effects of maternal infant-directed singing on infant physiological arousal

S5.iii:   Ira Marriott Haresign, The University of East London

Mutual gaze leads to phase reorganization and concomitant short-term increases in interpersonal neural synchrony

S5.iv: Shir Atzil, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

S5 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

20:30-01:00  Poster Session 1 (available on demand)


22:00-22:30  Welcoming remarks with ICIS President Lisa Oakes


22:30-23:30 Symposium Sessions

Invited Session: Solutions for studying development in clinical settings (pre-recorded)

Bridgette Kelleher, Purdue University

Evelyne Mercure, Goldsmiths, University of London

Susan Rivera, University of California Davis (moderator)

 

Recorded Webinar: How to have effective collaborations: Advice from the Manybabies team webinar (60 minutes)

Christina Bergmann, Max Planck Institute

Kiley Hamlin, University of British Columbia

Krista Byers-Heinlein, Concordia University

Casey Lew-Williams, Princeton (moderator)


 

23:30-01:00  Symposium Sessions

 

S.6  Timing is everything: The temporal dynamics of labeling in typical and atypical language development

Chair: Jill Lany, University of Liverpool

S6.i:   Jill Lany, University of Liverpool

The temporal dynamics of labeling shape object recognition

S6.ii:   Michael Goldstein, Cornell University

Relative contributions of infant-directed speech and motion when learning new words

S6.iii:   Madhavilatha Maganti, Ashoka University

Maternal synchronous gesture adaptations during object naming to term and preterm infants: A longitudinal study

S6.iv:   Chi-hsin Chen, The Ohio State University

Children’s hearing loss affects the synchrony between parents’ object naming and children’s attention to objects in parent-child interactions

 

S.7  Individual differences in attentional control and executive functions in the first two years of life

Chair: Alexandra Hendry, University of Oxford

S7.i:   Maria Rosario Rueda, University of Granada

Early development of the executive attention network in infancy

S7.ii:   Martha Ann Bell, Virginia Tech

Monthly development of cognitive and attention inhibition in the first year

S7.iii:   Alexandra Hendry, University of Oxford

Inhibitory control at 10 and 16 months on the A-not-B task and the Early Childhood Inhibitory Touchscreen Task

S7 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.8 Parent and child contributions to emotion regulation: Beyond main effects to complex developmental pathways

Chair: Kaya de Barbaro, University of Texas at Austin

S8.i:   Lauren Bailes, University of North Carolina Greensboro

Mother and infant contributions to infant negative emotionality over time

S8.ii:   Kaya de Barbaro, University of Texas at Austin

Mama tried: Contingent responding to distress does not increase rate of real-time soothing in infants high in negative emotionality

S8.iii:   Niyantri Ravindran, The Pennsylvania State University

Parental structuring of toddler negative emotion predicts children’s use of distraction longitudinally

S8.iv: Maria Gartstein, Washington State University (Discussant)

S8 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.9  The role of action understanding in early sociomoral cognition

Chair: Brandon Woo, Harvard University

S9.i  Denis Tatone, Central European University

Twelve-month-old infants use payoff information to disambiguate the goals of agents involved in a joint activity

S9.ii:   Fransisca Ting, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

16-month-old infants perceive irrational individuals as having reduced moral rights

S9.iii:   Brandon Woo, Harvard University

Social cognition in context: Infants’ evaluations of helping in means-end sequences

S9.iv:   Elizabeth Enright, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Toddlers consider others’ goals when helping others

S.9 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.10  The I in team: Individual differences in infancy shape social competence and prosociality

Chair: Jess Aitken, University of Auckland

S10.i:   Robert Hepach, Leipzig University

Children’s positive emotions following helping others and seeing others being helped: Evidence for a developmental shift

S10.ii :   Jess Aitken, University of Auckland

Temperament and cooperative ability in infancy: Are effects of temperament mediated through children’s social behaviour during cooperative tasks?

S10.iii:   Amanda Brandone, Lehigh University

Developmental pathways from infant social cognition to later prosocial behavior and theory of mind

S10.iv:   Moritz Köster, Freie Universität Berlin

A developmental systems approach to early helping behavior

S.10 Q&A: Robert Hepach, Amanda Brandone & Moritz Köster will be available for questions during Congress Proceedings 1 (BST), with Amanda Brandone and Jess Aitken available for questions during both Congress Proceedings 1 (BST) and 2 (PDT)

Day 2: July 7

19:00-20:30  Poster Session 2


 

20:30-22:00 Symposium Sessions

 

S.11  The origins of causal thought

Chair: Jonathan Kominsky, Rutgers University – Newark

S11.i:   Deon Benton, Brown University

Stop in the name of contact: How infants learn about the causal properties of people and objects

S11.ii:   Samantha Wood, Indiana University

Reverse engineering the origins of causal knowledge

S11.iii:   Katarina Begus, Rutgers University – Newark

Not all information is created equal: Investigating infants’ sensitivity to confounded information in a causal reasoning task

S11.iv:   Jonathan Kominsky, Rutgers University – Newark

Disconnected causal representations in the first year of life

S11 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

S.12 The structure and function of biobehavioral synchrony in early development

Chair: Bennett Bertenthal, Indiana University

S12.i:   Elizabeth daSilva, Indiana University-Purdue University Columbus

Infant-mother physiological synchrony moderates infants’ self-regulation

S12.ii:   Stefanie Höhl, University of Vienna

Tuned in: Neural synchrony in mother-infant dyads

S12.iii:   Elise Piazza, Princeton University

Neural synchrony predicts novel word learning from storybooks

S12.iv:   Megan Whitehorn, UEL

Parental frontal brain activity tracks infant attention during shared play

S12 Q&A: live questions taking place during both Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) and 2 (PDT) 

 

S.13 Rhythm perception in infants: Neural, pupillary, and motor entrainment to speech

Chair: Judit Gervain, Université Paris Descartes

S13.i:   Tineke M. Snijders, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

Tracking speech rhythm in the 7.5 month old infant brain is related to word segmentation performance at 9 months

S13.ii:   Áine Ní Choisdealbha, University of Cambridge

Changes in neural rhythmic entrainment during the first year of life

S13.iii:   Alan Langus, University of Potsdam

Individual variability in pupillary entrainment predicts speech segmentation with prosodic and statistical cues in infancy

S13.iv:   Natalie Boll-Avetisyan, University of Potsdam

Infants show spontaneous motor entrainment while listening to rhythmic speech

 

S.14 Understanding infants’ lives by the use of smartphones: Experience sampling and ambulatory assessment

Chair: Stephanie Wermelinger, University of Zurich

S14.i:   Sophie von Stumm, University of York

Using digital technologies for assessing infants’ cognitive development in real-time

S14.ii:   Nivedita Mani, University of Goettingen

Online testing technology for infant touchscreen and looking time tasks

S14.iii:   Stephanie Wermelinger, University of Zurich

Identifiying dynamic developmental processes during infancy by using the WeltentdeckerApp

S14 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

20:30-01:15  Poster Session 2 (available on demand)


 

22:00-23:30  Symposium Sessions

Invited Session: Secondary Data analysis of existing data files (pre-recorded)

Michael Thomas, Birkbeck, University of London

Alex Cristia, CNRS

Marije Verhage, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam

Sarah Jensen, Boston College (moderator)

 

Invited Session: Online solutions for data collection (pre-recorded)

Rhodri Cusack, Trinity College Dublin

Emily Jones & Elena Throm, Birkbeck, University of London

Caspar Addyman, Goldsmiths, University of London

Natasha Kirkham, Birkbeck, University of London (moderator)


 

23:45-01:15  Symposium Sessions

 

S.15  Brain & Behavior: New insights into neural correlates of infant emotion regulation

Chair: Courtney Filippi, University of Maryland

S15.i:   Elina Thomas, Oregon Health and Science University

Newborn amygdala connectivity to prefrontal and sensory regions is associated with early emerging regulatory behavior

S15.ii:   Courtney Filippi, University of Maryland

Associations between amygdala connectivity and negative reactive temperament

S15.iii:   Chad Sylvester, Washington University

Maternal Anxiety and Neonatal Brain Response to Novel Sounds as Assessed with fMRI

S15 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.16  Insights from outside the lab: Modeling observational data to understand language learning

Chair: Mika Braginsky, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

S16.i:   Eva Portelance, Stanford University

Using neural network language models to predict age of acquisition for early vocabulary

S16.ii:   Stephan Meylan, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Characterizing child-directed listening with corpus and model-based analyses

S16.iii:   Mika Braginsky, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Characterizing the relationship between lexical and morphological development

S16.iv:   Georgia Loukatou, CNRS, PSL University

Assessing cross-linguistic viability of infant word segmentation models

S.16 Q&A: Georia Loukatou will be available for questions during Congress Proceedings 1 (BST), with Eva Portelance, Stephan Meylan & Mika Braginsky available for questions during both Congress Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.17 How multiple exemplars help infants and young children extend their knowledge

Chair: Jane Childers, Trinity University

S17.i:   Susan Graham, University of Calgary

Multiple exemplars facilitate 9-month-olds’ property generalizations

S17.ii:   Jane Childers, Trinity University

Extending verbs to new events: Does the comparison of events over delays help?

S17.iii:   Christina Schonberg, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Why do multiple examples help children learn words? The roles of aggregation, decontextualization, and memory dynamics

S17.iv:  Scott Johnson, University of California, Los Angeles

Discussant

S.17 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

S.18  Child evocative effects in the context of parenting across developmental systems: A behavioral and neurophysiological perspective

Chair: Diane Lickenbrock, Western Kentucky University

S18.i:   Kayla Brown, The Pennsylvania State University

Difficult temperament profiles and externalizing behaviors: The moderating effects on harsh parenting and dyadic inconsistency

S18.ii:   Berenice Anaya, Penn State University

Maternal anxiety and infant negative affect trajectories: The role of neural and environmental factors during infancy

S18.iii:   Diane Lickenbrock, Western Kentucky University

Infant physiological regulation with mothers and fathers: The effects of infant temperament and parent factors

S18 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.19  Fair’s fair?: Intentions and relationships impact infants’ expectations about fairness and preferences for fair individuals

Chair: Zoe Liberman, University of California Santa Barbara

S19.i:   Luca Surian, University of Trento

Preverbal infants’ intention-based evaluations of fairness

S19.ii:   Anna-Elisabeth Baumann, University of Chicago

Infants’ reactions to resource distribution outcomes as a function of ingroup/outgroup manipulations and language status

S19.iii:   Lin Bian, Cornell University

Do 4-month-olds take into account group membership when judging fair outcomes?

S19.iv:   Zoe Liberman, University of California Santa Barbara

Infants predict that distributors will act partially towards their friends

S.19 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

Day 3: July 8

19:00-20:30  Poster Session 3


 

20:30-22:00  Symposium Sessions

 

S.20  Enhancing our understanding of social cognition in infancy through cutting-edge technology and individualized approaches

Chair: Giorgia Bussu, Radboud University Medical Center

S20.i:   Maheen Siddiqui, Birkbeck, University of London

Spatially resolved measures of cytochrome-c-oxidase during functional activation in infants

S20.ii:   David López Pérez, Institute of Psychology, Polish Academy of Sciences

Efficiency of scanning in infancy in the presence and absence of faces differentially predicts expressive and receptive language in toddlers

S20.iii:   Giorgia Bussu, Radboud University Medical Center

An individual approach to understand the nature of face processing in early autism

S20.iv:   Anna Gui, Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development, Birkbeck College, University of London

Neuroadaptive optimization to study how neural signatures of attention to faces in infants relate to later autism

S.20 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.21 Not just the linguistic factor! Associations between maternal child-directed speech and cognitive and socio-emotional competencies

Chair: Maria Spinelli, University G. D’Annunzio Chieti-Pescara

Discussant: Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, Temple University

S21.i:   Prachi Shah, University of Michigan

Parent language stimulation, parent sensitivity and socioeconomic status: Associations with curiosity

S21.ii:   Chiara Suttora, University of Bologna

The role of maternal verbal input in the emergence of mental lexicon in early childhood

S21.iii:   Maria Spinelli, University G. D’Annunzio Chieti-Pescara

Talk to me mum! The longitudinal effects of prosodic and linguistic characteristics of infant directed speech on the development of child attention and emotion regulation

S21.iv:   Brianna McMillan, Temple University

Fluid, back-and-forth conversation sets a foundation for infant executive function skills

S.21 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

S.22 Tips, tricks, and statistics: Recommendations for improving infant research methods

Chair: Lena V. Kremin, Concordia University

S22.i:   Esther Schott, Concordia University

Tools for transparency: Practical tips for sharing your research

S22.ii:   Lena V. Kremin, Concordia University

Let the data do the talking: Optimizing visualizations for transparency and readability

S22.iii:   Nivedita Mani, University of Goettingen

Bayesian sequential testing in developmental research

S22.iv:   Alejandrina Cristia, ENS, EHESS, CNRS, PSL University

Using long-form recordings to study infants’ speech input and outcomes: Opportunities and challenges

S22 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.23 Building contingency: How caregiver and child characteristics relate to interactions that support infant language

Chair: Lillian Masek, Temple University

S23.i:   Rebecca Alper, Temple University

One is not enough: Understanding variability in early language interaction quality using parent self-efficacy and developmental knowledge profiles

S23.ii:   Lillian Masek, Temple University

Building fluid and connected conversation: How caregiver speech differentially relates to interaction quality

S23.iii:   Rufan Luo, Rutgers University, Camden

Maternal question use and child language outcomes: The moderating role of SES and children’s concurrent vocabulary

S.23 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

20:30-01:00  Poster Session 3 (available on demand)


 

22:00-23:15 Symposium Sessions

Invited Session: Modeling development from existing data (pre-recorded)

Gert Westermann, Lancaster University

Jochen Triesch, Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies

Katherine Twomey, University of Manchester (moderator)

Recorded Webinar: Data Repositories: Resources for studying development (75 minutes)

Karen Adolph, New York University

Marisa Casillas, Max Planck Institute

Brian MacWhinney, Carnegie Mellon University

Caitlin Fausey, University of Oregon (moderator)


 

23:30-01:00  Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.24  Novel technologies to assess language development in infants

Chair: Julien Mayor, University of Oslo

S24.i:   Virginia Marchman, Stanford University

Using web-based platforms to expand the socioeconomic reach of parent report measures of vocabulary development

S24.ii:   Julien Mayor, University of Oslo

BabyLex-IRT: Estimating early vocabulary sizes using a Bayesian-inspired item-response theory approach

S24.iii:   Camila Scaff, University of Zurich

Socio-economic status and word comprehension in early childhood: A study in a low inequality setting and a meta-analytic review

S24.iv:   Amanda Seidl, Purdue University

The development of canonical babble in a crosslinguistic and cross-cultural corpus

S24 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.25: Embracing new technologies to quantify early learning environments

Chair: Sara Schroer, Indiana University

S25.i:   Sara Schroer, Indiana University

Hands-on learning: Toddler’s multimodal attention at naming moments leads to successful word learning

S25.ii:   George Kachergis, Stanford University

Automatically detecting children’s visual access to social information in egocentric videos

S25.iii:   Marisa Casillas, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

The linguistic landscapes of learning in two small-scale societies

S25.iv:   Mira Nencheva, Princeton University

Analyzing emotion in language input: Caregivers’ cues to valence support toddlers’ learning of emotion words

S.25 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) and Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.26 Updates from the ManyBabies Consortium: Four collaborative replications of important findings in infancy research

Chair: Michael Frank, Stanford University

S26.i:   Angeline Sin Mei Tsui, Stanford University

ManyBabies 1B: Testing bilinguals’ preference for infant-directed speech

S26.ii:   Dora Kampis, University of Copenhagen

ManyBabies 2: Theory of mind in infancy

S26.iii:   Ingmar Visser, University of Amsterdam

ManyBabies 3: Infant rule learning: a multi-lab replication study

S26.iv:   Kelsey Lucca, Arizona State University

ManyBabies 4: A large-scale, multi-lab, coordinated replication study of infants’ social evaluations

S26 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.27  Real-world interactions in Real Time: Moment-to-moment dynamics of parent-infant joint engagement in naturalistic contexts

Chair: Catalina Suarez-Rivera, New York University

S27.i:   Chen Yu, Indiana University

Multiple sensorimotor pathways to parent-infant coordinated attention in naturalistic toy play

S27.ii:   Betina Karshaleva, University of California, San Diego

Infant vocalizations and maternal speech in naturalistic play: Contingencies from 4 to 12 months

S27.iii:   Catalina Suarez-Rivera, New York University

Everyday joint engagement: Coupling of the mothers body with the infants manual actions

S27.iv:   Jacob Schatz, New York University

Playing and learning together: Spontaneous joint engagement scaffolds infant play at home

S27 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.28  Exploring the circumstances in which infants attribute dispositions to agents

Chair: Megan Pronovost, California State University, Fresno

S28.i:   You-jung Choi, Harvard University

Three-month-old infants’ understanding of a human agent’s preference

S28.ii:   Su-hua Wang, University of California, Santa Cruz

Self-experience scaffolds infants’ reasoning about preference

S28.iii:   Lin Bian, Cornell University

8-month-olds attribute, and expect others to attribute, strong preferences to agents

S28.iv:   Megan Pronovost, California State University, Fresno

20-month-old infants’ attribution of behavioral dispositions to agents

S.28 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

Day 4: July 9

19:00-20:30  Poster Session 4


 

20:30-22:00  Symposium Sessions

S.29  Integrating computational and neuroimaging methods to investigate infant cognitive development

Chair: Laurie Bayet, American University

S29.i:   Benjamin Zinszer, Princeton University

Decoding representations of familiar objects in young infants using fNIRS

S29.ii:   Laurie Bayet, American University

Time-course and properties of higher-order visual representations in the infant brain

S29.iii:   Rhodri Cusack, Trinity College Dublin

Deep neural networks as a model of learning during the helpless period of infancy

S29.iv:   Nicholas Turk-Browne, Yale University

Adult-grade cognitive neuroscience in infants

S29 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.30 The reciprocal roles of parents and children in organizing learning opportunities in dyadic interaction

Chair: Steven Elmlinger, Cornell University

Discussant: Michael Goldstein, Cornell University

S30.i:   Miriam Langeloh, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences

Are you like me? Contingent adult-infant interactions in a naturalistic dual-EEG paradigm

S30.ii:   Steven Elmlinger, Cornell University

The development of prelinguistic vocal sequences: implications for early communication and language

S30.iii:   Sara Schroer, Indiana University

Toddler vocalizations shape the structure of parent-child interactions

S30.iv:   Katharina Rohlfing, Paderborn University

Do maternal vocalizations scaffold children to take up an active role in peekaboo routine?

S.30 Q&A:  All presenters available to take questions during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST). Steven Elmlinger, Sara Schroer, and Katharina Rolfing are available during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT). Discussant: Michael Goldstein is available for both Q&A sessions

 

S.31 Fine-grained environmental data illuminate the process of language learning

Chair: Daniel Swingley, University of Pennsylvania

S31.i  Daniel Swingley, University of Pennsylvania

How learning word-forms could guide infants to phonetic categories: New evidence from English

S31.ii:   Catherine Tamis-LeMonda, New York University

The food for thought: Unpacking the everyday language experiences of infants

S31.iii:   Chen Yu, Indiana University

Rethinking input: The infant’s view challenges the problem of referential uncertainty in early word learning

S31.iv:   Emmanuel Dupoux, EHESS

Reverse engineering early language acquisition: Can machine learning help?

S31 Q&A: live questions taking place with all speakers during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST), with some speakers being available during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.32 What can video coding tell us about infant development? Methodological examples and new results from two preterm infant cohorts

Chair: Sue Fletcher-Watson, University of Edinburgh

S32.i:   Bethan Dean, University of Edinburgh

Longitudinal assessment of social cognition in infants born preterm using eye-tracking and parent-child play

S32.ii:   Sinead O’Carroll, University of Edinburgh

Frequency and type of parental gesture during parent-child play is influenced by socioeconomic status and gestational age at birth

S32.iii:   Lorna Ginnell, University of Edinburgh

Reduced emotional response to the still-face paradigm in preterm infants

S.32 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.33 Parent-infant interaction styles in diverse populations and their impact on infant development

Chair: Sarah Lloyd-Fox, Cambridge University

S33.i:   Bosiljka Milosavljevic, Birkbeck, University of London

Mother-infant interactions, maternal mental health and infant cognitive outcomes in The Gambia

S33.ii:   Ciara Kelly, University of Sheffield

The communication of deaf infants with hearing parents

S33.iii:   Evelyne Mercure, Goldsmiths, University of London

Deaf mothers and their hearing infants: Social interaction, maternal sensitivity and language development

S33.iv:   Atsushi Senju, Birkbeck, University of London

Development of social attention and communication in infants of blind parents

S.33 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

20:30-01:00  Poster Session 4 (available on demand)


 

22:00-22:30 Symposium Sessions

 

Invited Session: Solutions for studying early language development (pre-recorded)

Katie Alcock, Lancaster University

Mike Frank, Stanford

Elizabeth Norton, Northwestern

Jessica Horst, University of Sussex (moderator)

Recorded Webinar: Stress and Development webinar (75 minutes)

Marion van den Heuvel, Tilburg University

Dima Amso, Brown University

Natasha Kirkham, Birkbeck, University of London

Brittney Chere, Birkbeck, University of London (moderator)


 

23:30-01:00  Symposium Sessions

 

S.34  Parent-infant interactions and language development in infants with communication disorders

Chair: Yuanyuan Wang, Ohio State University

S34.i :   Yuanyuan Wang, Ohio State University

The effects of hearing loss on the social feedback loop in infants with cochlear implants

S34.ii:   Girija Kadlaskar, Purdue University

Caregiver touch-speech communication and infant responses in 12-month-olds at high risk for autism spectrum disorder

S34.iii:   John Bunce, California State University East Bay

Why do I keep repeating myself? Exploring how parental assumptions of children’s comprehension effects word repetition patterns

S34.iv:   Derek Houston, The Ohio State University

Parent-infant interactions and word-learning skills in deaf infants with cochlear implants

S34 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.35  Novel approaches to electroencephalogram (EEG) lateralization: Beyond traditional asymmetry

Chair: Maria Gartstein, Washington State University

S35.i:   Maria Gartstein, Washington State University

EEG frontal asymmetry changes during emotion-eliciting tasks and parent-child interaction dynamics

S35.ii:   Ross Vanderwert, Cardiff University

Individual differences in frontal asymmetry while viewing emotion faces: A capability model approach

S35.iii:   Martha Ann Bell, Virginia Tech

Predictors of level of negative affect after arm restraint at 5 months

S35.iv:   Nancy Jones, Florida Atlantic University

Infant neurophysiological patterns and temperament are linked to maternal depressive symptoms

S.35 Q&A:  Ross Vanderwert will be available for questions during Congress Proceedings 1 (BST), with Maria Gartstein, Martha Ann Bell and Nancy Jones available for questions during Congress Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.36 Learning ‘hard words’: The role of conceptual representations when the tough gets tougher

Chair: Laura Lakusta, Montclair State University

S36.i:   Nicolò Cesana Arlotti, Johns Hopkins University

An investigation of the origins of logical quantification: Infant’s (and adult’s) representations of exhaustivity in collective or individual complex actions

S36.ii:   Ariel Starr, University of Washington

Spatial metaphor facilitates word learning

S36.iii:   Laura Lakusta, Montclair State University

Getting support for ‘support’: The privileging of ‘Support-From-Below’ in early spatial language acquisition

S.36 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

S.37 Cultural differences in mind-mindedness and infant-mother interaction

Chair: Elizabeth Meins, University of York

S37.i:   Catherine McMahon, Macquarie University

Cross-cultural comparison of maternal mind-mindedness among Australian and Chinese mothers of toddlers

S37.ii:   Yujin Lee, University of York

How does culture and empathy relate to mothers’ mind-mindedness?

S37.iii:  Nao Fujita, University of Cambridge

A cross-cultural comparison of maternal mind-mindedness and speech characteristics between Japan and the UK

S37.iv:   Katie Slocombe, University of York

Cross-cultural differences in mother-infant play behaviour

S.37 Q&A:  Katie Slocombe, Nao Fujita and Yujin Lee will be available for questions during Congress Proceedings 1 (BST), with Cathy McMahon being available for questions during Congress Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.38  Better safe than sorry: Infants’ use of social information to reason and learn about threat

Chair: Shari Liu, Harvard University

S38.i:   Shari Liu, Harvard University

Dangerous ground: Thirteen-month-old infants are sensitive to peril in other people’s actions

S38.ii:   Camille Rioux, Max Planck Institute for Human Development

Social information reduces infants’ avoidance of plants

S38.iii:   Tobias Grossmann, University of Virginia

Friend or foe? Impression formation in the human infant brain

S38.iv:   Zoe Liberman, University of California Santa Barbara

Not all negative emotions are equal: Infants selectively attend to threat

S.38 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

*Sessions available on demand next day

Day 1: July 7

04:00-05:30  Poster Session 1


 

05:30-07:00  Symposium Sessions

 

S.1  Early language across-cultures: Input, language processes and outcome measures

Chair: Laia Fibla, University of East Anglia

S1.i:   Marisa Casillas, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

Day-wide patterns in the use of child-directed speech in two non-Western, subsistence farming communities

S1.ii:   Camila Scaff,  University of Zurich

Exploring conversational turns and partners among Tsimane forager-horticulturalists

S1.iii:   Alejandrina Cristia, CNRS, PSL University

Spontaneous vocalizations from birth to age four: Insights from a mega-analysis of 13,785 hours of audio

S1.iv:   Laia Fibla, University of East Anglia

Early language processing and language exposure across-cultures: UK and India

S1 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) with some speakers being available during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.2 Environmental influences on infant attention: A global perspective

Chair: Sarah Lloyd-Fox, University of Cambridge

S2.i:   Samantha McCann, King’s College London

Undernutrition in infancy impacts early brain development in The Gambia: An fNIRS study

S2.ii:   Annie Brandes-Aitken, New York University

Contributions of cumulative parent cortisol to the neural underpinnings of infant attention and emotion regulation

S2.iii:   Sam Wass, University of East London

Physiological stress, sustained attention and cognitive engagement in 12-month-old infants from urban environments

S2 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.3 Investigating the relationship between representing the self and the other in early development

Chair: Victoria Southgate, University of Copenhagen

S3.i:   Chiara Bulgarelli, University College London

The role of self-awareness in selective facial mimicry of native over foreign speakers

S3.ii:   Dora Kampis, University of Copenhagen

The mapping of others to oneself in 16-26-old infants

S3.iii:   Josephine Ross, University of Dundee

Autocentric or allocentric? Exploring the co-development of self-representation and positive social behavior

S3.iv:   Milica Nikolic, University of Amsterdam

Implicit self-recognition in infancy predicts self-conscious emotional reactivity in childhood

 

S.4 Early markers for neurodevelopmental disorders: Towards the identification of trajectories to atypical cognitive outcomes

Chairs: Viola Macchi Cassia, University of Milano-Bicocca & Chiara Cantiani, Scientific Institute, IRCCS Medea

S4.i:   Valeria Costanzo, IRCCS Stella Maris Foundation

Social and non-social early markers of ASD: The relationship between disengagement of attention and joint attention in high-risk siblings at 12 months of life

S4.ii:   Valentina Riva, Scientific Institute, IRCCS Medea

Atypical ERP responses to multisensory integration in infants at risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder

S4.iii:   Roberta Bettoni, University of Milano-Bicocca

Visual implicit learning abilities in infants at familial risk for Development Language Disorder

S4.iv:   Gaia Scherif, Oxford University

Understanding variable outcomes in genetic syndromes: The importance of early developmental phenotyping

S4 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.5 The rhythm of our heart and mind: Neurophysiological responses to communicative rhythms in parent-infant interactions

Chair: Trinh Nguyen, University of Vienna

S5.i:   Trinh Nguyen, University of Vienna

The role of physiological synchrony for attachment

S5.ii:   Christina Schätz, University of Vienna

Effects of maternal infant-directed singing on infant physiological arousal

S5.iii:   Ira Marriott Haresign, The University of East London

Mutual gaze leads to phase reorganization and concomitant short-term increases in interpersonal neural synchrony

S5.iv: Shir Atzil, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

S5 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

05:30-10:00  Poster Session 1 (available on demand)


07:00-07:30  Welcoming remarks with ICIS President Lisa Oakes


07:30-08:30 Symposium Sessions

Invited Session: Solutions for studying development in clinical settings (pre-recorded)

Bridgette Kelleher, Purdue University

Evelyne Mercure, Goldsmiths, University of London

Susan Rivera, University of California Davis (moderator)

 

Recorded Webinar: How to have effective collaborations: Advice from the Manybabies team webinar (60 minutes)

Christina Bergmann, Max Planck Institute

Kiley Hamlin, University of British Columbia

Krista Byers-Heinlein, Concordia University

Casey Lew-Williams, Princeton (moderator)


 

08:30-10:00  Symposium Sessions

 

S.6  Timing is everything: The temporal dynamics of labeling in typical and atypical language development

Chair: Jill Lany, University of Liverpool

S6.i:   Jill Lany, University of Liverpool

The temporal dynamics of labeling shape object recognition

S6.ii:   Michael Goldstein, Cornell University

Relative contributions of infant-directed speech and motion when learning new words

S6.iii:   Madhavilatha Maganti, Ashoka University

Maternal synchronous gesture adaptations during object naming to term and preterm infants: A longitudinal study

S6.iv:   Chi-hsin Chen, The Ohio State University

Children’s hearing loss affects the synchrony between parents’ object naming and children’s attention to objects in parent-child interactions

 

S.7  Individual differences in attentional control and executive functions in the first two years of life

Chair: Alexandra Hendry, University of Oxford

S7.i:   Maria Rosario Rueda, University of Granada

Early development of the executive attention network in infancy

S7.ii:   Martha Ann Bell, Virginia Tech

Monthly development of cognitive and attention inhibition in the first year

S7.iii:   Alexandra Hendry, University of Oxford

Inhibitory control at 10 and 16 months on the A-not-B task and the Early Childhood Inhibitory Touchscreen Task

S7 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.8 Parent and child contributions to emotion regulation: Beyond main effects to complex developmental pathways

Chair: Kaya de Barbaro, University of Texas at Austin

S8.i:   Lauren Bailes, University of North Carolina Greensboro

Mother and infant contributions to infant negative emotionality over time

S8.ii:   Kaya de Barbaro, University of Texas at Austin

Mama tried: Contingent responding to distress does not increase rate of real-time soothing in infants high in negative emotionality

S8.iii:   Niyantri Ravindran, The Pennsylvania State University

Parental structuring of toddler negative emotion predicts children’s use of distraction longitudinally

S8.iv: Maria Gartstein, Washington State University (Discussant)

S8 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.9  The role of action understanding in early sociomoral cognition

Chair: Brandon Woo, Harvard University

S9.i  Denis Tatone, Central European University

Twelve-month-old infants use payoff information to disambiguate the goals of agents involved in a joint activity

S9.ii:   Fransisca Ting, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

16-month-old infants perceive irrational individuals as having reduced moral rights

S9.iii:   Brandon Woo, Harvard University

Social cognition in context: Infants’ evaluations of helping in means-end sequences

S9.iv:   Elizabeth Enright, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Toddlers consider others’ goals when helping others

S.9 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.10  The I in team: Individual differences in infancy shape social competence and prosociality

Chair: Jess Aitken, University of Auckland

S10.i:   Robert Hepach, Leipzig University

Children’s positive emotions following helping others and seeing others being helped: Evidence for a developmental shift

S10.ii :   Jess Aitken, University of Auckland

Temperament and cooperative ability in infancy: Are effects of temperament mediated through children’s social behaviour during cooperative tasks?

S10.iii:   Amanda Brandone, Lehigh University

Developmental pathways from infant social cognition to later prosocial behavior and theory of mind

S10.iv:   Moritz Köster, Freie Universität Berlin

A developmental systems approach to early helping behavior

S.10 Q&A: Robert Hepach, Amanda Brandone & Moritz Köster will be available for questions during Congress Proceedings 1 (BST), with Amanda Brandone and Jess Aitken available for questions during both Congress Proceedings 1 (BST) and 2 (PDT)

Day 2: July 8

04:00-05:30  Poster Session 2


 

05:30-07:00 Symposium Sessions

 

S.11  The origins of causal thought

Chair: Jonathan Kominsky, Rutgers University – Newark

S11.i:   Deon Benton, Brown University

Stop in the name of contact: How infants learn about the causal properties of people and objects

S11.ii:   Samantha Wood, Indiana University

Reverse engineering the origins of causal knowledge

S11.iii:   Katarina Begus, Rutgers University – Newark

Not all information is created equal: Investigating infants’ sensitivity to confounded information in a causal reasoning task

S11.iv:   Jonathan Kominsky, Rutgers University – Newark

Disconnected causal representations in the first year of life

S11 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

S.12 The structure and function of biobehavioral synchrony in early development

Chair: Bennett Bertenthal, Indiana University

S12.i:   Elizabeth daSilva, Indiana University-Purdue University Columbus

Infant-mother physiological synchrony moderates infants’ self-regulation

S12.ii:   Stefanie Höhl, University of Vienna

Tuned in: Neural synchrony in mother-infant dyads

S12.iii:   Elise Piazza, Princeton University

Neural synchrony predicts novel word learning from storybooks

S12.iv:   Megan Whitehorn, UEL

Parental frontal brain activity tracks infant attention during shared play

S12 Q&A: live questions taking place during both Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) and 2 (PDT) 

 

S.13 Rhythm perception in infants: Neural, pupillary, and motor entrainment to speech

Chair: Judit Gervain, Université Paris Descartes

S13.i:   Tineke M. Snijders, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

Tracking speech rhythm in the 7.5 month old infant brain is related to word segmentation performance at 9 months

S13.ii:   Áine Ní Choisdealbha, University of Cambridge

Changes in neural rhythmic entrainment during the first year of life

S13.iii:   Alan Langus, University of Potsdam

Individual variability in pupillary entrainment predicts speech segmentation with prosodic and statistical cues in infancy

S13.iv:   Natalie Boll-Avetisyan, University of Potsdam

Infants show spontaneous motor entrainment while listening to rhythmic speech

 

S.14 Understanding infants’ lives by the use of smartphones: Experience sampling and ambulatory assessment

Chair: Stephanie Wermelinger, University of Zurich

S14.i:   Sophie von Stumm, University of York

Using digital technologies for assessing infants’ cognitive development in real-time

S14.ii:   Nivedita Mani, University of Goettingen

Online testing technology for infant touchscreen and looking time tasks

S14.iii:   Stephanie Wermelinger, University of Zurich

Identifiying dynamic developmental processes during infancy by using the WeltentdeckerApp

S14 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

05:30-10:15  Poster Session 2 (available on demand)


 

07:00-08:30  Symposium Sessions

Invited Session: Secondary Data analysis of existing data files (pre-recorded)

Michael Thomas, Birkbeck, University of London

Alex Cristia, CNRS

Marije Verhage, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam

Sarah Jensen, Boston College (moderator)

 

Invited Session: Online solutions for data collection (pre-recorded)

Rhodri Cusack, Trinity College Dublin

Emily Jones & Elena Throm, Birkbeck, University of London

Caspar Addyman, Goldsmiths, University of London

Natasha Kirkham, Birkbeck, University of London (moderator)


 

08:45-10:15  Live Symposium Sessions

 

S.15  Brain & Behavior: New insights into neural correlates of infant emotion regulation

Chair: Courtney Filippi, University of Maryland

S15.i:   Elina Thomas, Oregon Health and Science University

Newborn amygdala connectivity to prefrontal and sensory regions is associated with early emerging regulatory behavior

S15.ii:   Courtney Filippi, University of Maryland

Associations between amygdala connectivity and negative reactive temperament

S15.iii:   Chad Sylvester, Washington University

Maternal Anxiety and Neonatal Brain Response to Novel Sounds as Assessed with fMRI

S15 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.16  Insights from outside the lab: Modeling observational data to understand language learning

Chair: Mika Braginsky, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

S16.i:   Eva Portelance, Stanford University

Using neural network language models to predict age of acquisition for early vocabulary

S16.ii:   Stephan Meylan, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Characterizing child-directed listening with corpus and model-based analyses

S16.iii:   Mika Braginsky, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Characterizing the relationship between lexical and morphological development

S16.iv:   Georgia Loukatou, CNRS, PSL University

Assessing cross-linguistic viability of infant word segmentation models

S.16 Q&A: Georia Loukatou will be available for questions during Congress Proceedings 1 (BST), with Eva Portelance, Stephan Meylan & Mika Braginsky available for questions during both Congress Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.17 How multiple exemplars help infants and young children extend their knowledge

Chair: Jane Childers, Trinity University

S17.i:   Susan Graham, University of Calgary

Multiple exemplars facilitate 9-month-olds’ property generalizations

S17.ii:   Jane Childers, Trinity University

Extending verbs to new events: Does the comparison of events over delays help?

S17.iii:   Christina Schonberg, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Why do multiple examples help children learn words? The roles of aggregation, decontextualization, and memory dynamics

S17.iv:  Scott Johnson, University of California, Los Angeles

Discussant

S.17 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

S.18  Child evocative effects in the context of parenting across developmental systems: A behavioral and neurophysiological perspective

Chair: Diane Lickenbrock, Western Kentucky University

S18.i:   Kayla Brown, The Pennsylvania State University

Difficult temperament profiles and externalizing behaviors: The moderating effects on harsh parenting and dyadic inconsistency

S18.ii:   Berenice Anaya, Penn State University

Maternal anxiety and infant negative affect trajectories: The role of neural and environmental factors during infancy

S18.iii:   Diane Lickenbrock, Western Kentucky University

Infant physiological regulation with mothers and fathers: The effects of infant temperament and parent factors

S18 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.19  Fair’s fair?: Intentions and relationships impact infants’ expectations about fairness and preferences for fair individuals

Chair: Zoe Liberman, University of California Santa Barbara

S19.i:   Luca Surian, University of Trento

Preverbal infants’ intention-based evaluations of fairness

S19.ii:   Anna-Elisabeth Baumann, University of Chicago

Infants’ reactions to resource distribution outcomes as a function of ingroup/outgroup manipulations and language status

S19.iii:   Lin Bian, Cornell University

Do 4-month-olds take into account group membership when judging fair outcomes?

S19.iv:   Zoe Liberman, University of California Santa Barbara

Infants predict that distributors will act partially towards their friends

S.19 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

Day 3: July 9

04:00-05:30  Poster Session 3


 

05:30-07:00  Symposium Sessions

 

S.20  Enhancing our understanding of social cognition in infancy through cutting-edge technology and individualized approaches

Chair: Giorgia Bussu, Radboud University Medical Center

S20.i:   Maheen Siddiqui, Birkbeck, University of London

Spatially resolved measures of cytochrome-c-oxidase during functional activation in infants

S20.ii:   David López Pérez, Institute of Psychology, Polish Academy of Sciences

Efficiency of scanning in infancy in the presence and absence of faces differentially predicts expressive and receptive language in toddlers

S20.iii:   Giorgia Bussu, Radboud University Medical Center

An individual approach to understand the nature of face processing in early autism

S20.iv:   Anna Gui, Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development, Birkbeck College, University of London

Neuroadaptive optimization to study how neural signatures of attention to faces in infants relate to later autism

S.20 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.21 Not just the linguistic factor! Associations between maternal child-directed speech and cognitive and socio-emotional competencies

Chair: Maria Spinelli, University G. D’Annunzio Chieti-Pescara

Discussant: Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, Temple University

S21.i:   Prachi Shah, University of Michigan

Parent language stimulation, parent sensitivity and socioeconomic status: Associations with curiosity

S21.ii:   Chiara Suttora, University of Bologna

The role of maternal verbal input in the emergence of mental lexicon in early childhood

S21.iii:   Maria Spinelli, University G. D’Annunzio Chieti-Pescara

Talk to me mum! The longitudinal effects of prosodic and linguistic characteristics of infant directed speech on the development of child attention and emotion regulation

S21.iv:   Brianna McMillan, Temple University

Fluid, back-and-forth conversation sets a foundation for infant executive function skills

S.21 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

S.22 Tips, tricks, and statistics: Recommendations for improving infant research methods

Chair: Lena V. Kremin, Concordia University

S22.i:   Esther Schott, Concordia University

Tools for transparency: Practical tips for sharing your research

S22.ii:   Lena V. Kremin, Concordia University

Let the data do the talking: Optimizing visualizations for transparency and readability

S22.iii:   Nivedita Mani, University of Goettingen

Bayesian sequential testing in developmental research

S22.iv:   Alejandrina Cristia, ENS, EHESS, CNRS, PSL University

Using long-form recordings to study infants’ speech input and outcomes: Opportunities and challenges

S22 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.23 Building contingency: How caregiver and child characteristics relate to interactions that support infant language

Chair: Lillian Masek, Temple University

S23.i:   Rebecca Alper, Temple University

One is not enough: Understanding variability in early language interaction quality using parent self-efficacy and developmental knowledge profiles

S23.ii:   Lillian Masek, Temple University

Building fluid and connected conversation: How caregiver speech differentially relates to interaction quality

S23.iii:   Rufan Luo, Rutgers University, Camden

Maternal question use and child language outcomes: The moderating role of SES and children’s concurrent vocabulary

S.23 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

05:30-10:00  Poster Session 3 (available on demand)


 

07:00-08:15 Symposium Sessions

Invited Session: Modeling development from existing data (pre-recorded)

Gert Westermann, Lancaster University

Jochen Triesch, Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies

Katherine Twomey, University of Manchester (moderator)

Recorded Webinar: Data Repositories: Resources for studying development (75 minutes)

Karen Adolph, New York University

Marisa Casillas, Max Planck Institute

Brian MacWhinney, Carnegie Mellon University

Caitlin Fausey, University of Oregon (moderator)


 

08:30-10:00  Symposium Sessions

 

S.24  Novel technologies to assess language development in infants

Chair: Julien Mayor, University of Oslo

S24.i:   Virginia Marchman, Stanford University

Using web-based platforms to expand the socioeconomic reach of parent report measures of vocabulary development

S24.ii:   Julien Mayor, University of Oslo

BabyLex-IRT: Estimating early vocabulary sizes using a Bayesian-inspired item-response theory approach

S24.iii:   Camila Scaff, University of Zurich

Socio-economic status and word comprehension in early childhood: A study in a low inequality setting and a meta-analytic review

S24.iv:   Amanda Seidl, Purdue University

The development of canonical babble in a crosslinguistic and cross-cultural corpus

S24 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.25: Embracing new technologies to quantify early learning environments

Chair: Sara Schroer, Indiana University

S25.i:   Sara Schroer, Indiana University

Hands-on learning: Toddler’s multimodal attention at naming moments leads to successful word learning

S25.ii:   George Kachergis, Stanford University

Automatically detecting children’s visual access to social information in egocentric videos

S25.iii:   Marisa Casillas, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

The linguistic landscapes of learning in two small-scale societies

S25.iv:   Mira Nencheva, Princeton University

Analyzing emotion in language input: Caregivers’ cues to valence support toddlers’ learning of emotion words

S.25 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) and Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.26 Updates from the ManyBabies Consortium: Four collaborative replications of important findings in infancy research

Chair: Michael Frank, Stanford University

S26.i:   Angeline Sin Mei Tsui, Stanford University

ManyBabies 1B: Testing bilinguals’ preference for infant-directed speech

S26.ii:   Dora Kampis, University of Copenhagen

ManyBabies 2: Theory of mind in infancy

S26.iii:   Ingmar Visser, University of Amsterdam

ManyBabies 3: Infant rule learning: a multi-lab replication study

S26.iv:   Kelsey Lucca, Arizona State University

ManyBabies 4: A large-scale, multi-lab, coordinated replication study of infants’ social evaluations

S26 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.27  Real-world interactions in Real Time: Moment-to-moment dynamics of parent-infant joint engagement in naturalistic contexts

Chair: Catalina Suarez-Rivera, New York University

S27.i:   Chen Yu, Indiana University

Multiple sensorimotor pathways to parent-infant coordinated attention in naturalistic toy play

S27.ii:   Betina Karshaleva, University of California, San Diego

Infant vocalizations and maternal speech in naturalistic play: Contingencies from 4 to 12 months

S27.iii:   Catalina Suarez-Rivera, New York University

Everyday joint engagement: Coupling of the mothers body with the infants manual actions

S27.iv:   Jacob Schatz, New York University

Playing and learning together: Spontaneous joint engagement scaffolds infant play at home

S27 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.28  Exploring the circumstances in which infants attribute dispositions to agents

Chair: Megan Pronovost, California State University, Fresno

S28.i:   You-jung Choi, Harvard University

Three-month-old infants’ understanding of a human agent’s preference

S28.ii:   Su-hua Wang, University of California, Santa Cruz

Self-experience scaffolds infants’ reasoning about preference

S28.iii:   Lin Bian, Cornell University

8-month-olds attribute, and expect others to attribute, strong preferences to agents

S28.iv:   Megan Pronovost, California State University, Fresno

20-month-old infants’ attribution of behavioral dispositions to agents

S.28 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

Day 4: July 10

04:00-05:30  Poster Session 4


 

05:30-07:00  Symposium Sessions

 

S.29  Integrating computational and neuroimaging methods to investigate infant cognitive development

Chair: Laurie Bayet, American University

S29.i:   Benjamin Zinszer, Princeton University

Decoding representations of familiar objects in young infants using fNIRS

S29.ii:   Laurie Bayet, American University

Time-course and properties of higher-order visual representations in the infant brain

S29.iii:   Rhodri Cusack, Trinity College Dublin

Deep neural networks as a model of learning during the helpless period of infancy

S29.iv:   Nicholas Turk-Browne, Yale University

Adult-grade cognitive neuroscience in infants

S29 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.30 The reciprocal roles of parents and children in organizing learning opportunities in dyadic interaction

Chair: Steven Elmlinger, Cornell University

Discussant: Michael Goldstein, Cornell University

S30.i:   Miriam Langeloh, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences

Are you like me? Contingent adult-infant interactions in a naturalistic dual-EEG paradigm

S30.ii:   Steven Elmlinger, Cornell University

The development of prelinguistic vocal sequences: implications for early communication and language

S30.iii:   Sara Schroer, Indiana University

Toddler vocalizations shape the structure of parent-child interactions

S30.iv:   Katharina Rohlfing, Paderborn University

Do maternal vocalizations scaffold children to take up an active role in peekaboo routine?

S.30 Q&A:  All presenters available to take questions during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST). Steven Elmlinger, Sara Schroer, and Katharina Rolfing are available during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT). Discussant: Michael Goldstein is available for both Q&A sessions

 

S.31 Fine-grained environmental data illuminate the process of language learning

Chair: Daniel Swingley, University of Pennsylvania

S31.i  Daniel Swingley, University of Pennsylvania

How learning word-forms could guide infants to phonetic categories: New evidence from English

S31.ii:   Catherine Tamis-LeMonda, New York University

The food for thought: Unpacking the everyday language experiences of infants

S31.iii:   Chen Yu, Indiana University

Rethinking input: The infant’s view challenges the problem of referential uncertainty in early word learning

S31.iv:   Emmanuel Dupoux, EHESS

Reverse engineering early language acquisition: Can machine learning help?

S31 Q&A: live questions taking place with all speakers during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST), with some speakers being available during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.32 What can video coding tell us about infant development? Methodological examples and new results from two preterm infant cohorts

Chair: Sue Fletcher-Watson, University of Edinburgh

S32.i:   Bethan Dean, University of Edinburgh

Longitudinal assessment of social cognition in infants born preterm using eye-tracking and parent-child play

S32.ii:   Sinead O’Carroll, University of Edinburgh

Frequency and type of parental gesture during parent-child play is influenced by socioeconomic status and gestational age at birth

S32.iii:   Lorna Ginnell, University of Edinburgh

Reduced emotional response to the still-face paradigm in preterm infants

S.32 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.33 Parent-infant interaction styles in diverse populations and their impact on infant development

Chair: Sarah Lloyd-Fox, Cambridge University

S33.i:   Bosiljka Milosavljevic, Birkbeck, University of London

Mother-infant interactions, maternal mental health and infant cognitive outcomes in The Gambia

S33.ii:   Ciara Kelly, University of Sheffield

The communication of deaf infants with hearing parents

S33.iii:   Evelyne Mercure, Goldsmiths, University of London

Deaf mothers and their hearing infants: Social interaction, maternal sensitivity and language development

S33.iv:   Atsushi Senju, Birkbeck, University of London

Development of social attention and communication in infants of blind parents

S.33 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

05:30-10:00  Poster Session 4 (available on demand)


 

07:00-08:30 Symposium Sessions

 

Invited Session: Solutions for studying early language development (pre-recorded)

Katie Alcock, Lancaster University

Mike Frank, Stanford

Elizabeth Norton, Northwestern

Jessica Horst, University of Sussex (moderator)

Recorded Webinar: Stress and Development webinar (75 minutes)

Marion van den Heuvel, Tilburg University

Dima Amso, Brown University

Natasha Kirkham, Birkbeck, University of London

Brittney Chere, Birkbeck, University of London (moderator)


 

08:30-10:00  Symposium Sessions

 

S.34  Parent-infant interactions and language development in infants with communication disorders

Chair: Yuanyuan Wang, Ohio State University

S34.i :   Yuanyuan Wang, Ohio State University

The effects of hearing loss on the social feedback loop in infants with cochlear implants

S34.ii:   Girija Kadlaskar, Purdue University

Caregiver touch-speech communication and infant responses in 12-month-olds at high risk for autism spectrum disorder

S34.iii:   John Bunce, California State University East Bay

Why do I keep repeating myself? Exploring how parental assumptions of children’s comprehension effects word repetition patterns

S34.iv:   Derek Houston, The Ohio State University

Parent-infant interactions and word-learning skills in deaf infants with cochlear implants

S34 Q&A: live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

 

S.35  Novel approaches to electroencephalogram (EEG) lateralization: Beyond traditional asymmetry

Chair: Maria Gartstein, Washington State University

S35.i:   Maria Gartstein, Washington State University

EEG frontal asymmetry changes during emotion-eliciting tasks and parent-child interaction dynamics

S35.ii:   Ross Vanderwert, Cardiff University

Individual differences in frontal asymmetry while viewing emotion faces: A capability model approach

S35.iii:   Martha Ann Bell, Virginia Tech

Predictors of level of negative affect after arm restraint at 5 months

S35.iv:   Nancy Jones, Florida Atlantic University

Infant neurophysiological patterns and temperament are linked to maternal depressive symptoms

S.35 Q&A:  Ross Vanderwert will be available for questions during Congress Proceedings 1 (BST), with Maria Gartstein, Martha Ann Bell and Nancy Jones available for questions during Congress Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.36 Learning ‘hard words’: The role of conceptual representations when the tough gets tougher

Chair: Laura Lakusta, Montclair State University

S36.i:   Nicolò Cesana Arlotti, Johns Hopkins University

An investigation of the origins of logical quantification: Infant’s (and adult’s) representations of exhaustivity in collective or individual complex actions

S36.ii:   Ariel Starr, University of Washington

Spatial metaphor facilitates word learning

S36.iii:   Laura Lakusta, Montclair State University

Getting support for ‘support’: The privileging of ‘Support-From-Below’ in early spatial language acquisition

S.36 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 2 (PDT) only

 

S.37 Cultural differences in mind-mindedness and infant-mother interaction

Chair: Elizabeth Meins, University of York

S37.i:   Catherine McMahon, Macquarie University

Cross-cultural comparison of maternal mind-mindedness among Australian and Chinese mothers of toddlers

S37.ii:   Yujin Lee, University of York

How does culture and empathy relate to mothers’ mind-mindedness?

S37.iii:  Nao Fujita, University of Cambridge

A cross-cultural comparison of maternal mind-mindedness and speech characteristics between Japan and the UK

S37.iv:   Katie Slocombe, University of York

Cross-cultural differences in mother-infant play behaviour

S.37 Q&A:  Katie Slocombe, Nao Fujita and Yujin Lee will be available for questions during Congress Proceedings 1 (BST), with Cathy McMahon being available for questions during Congress Proceedings 2 (PDT)

 

S.38  Better safe than sorry: Infants’ use of social information to reason and learn about threat

Chair: Shari Liu, Harvard University

S38.i:   Shari Liu, Harvard University

Dangerous ground: Thirteen-month-old infants are sensitive to peril in other people’s actions

S38.ii:   Camille Rioux, Max Planck Institute for Human Development

Social information reduces infants’ avoidance of plants

S38.iii:   Tobias Grossmann, University of Virginia

Friend or foe? Impression formation in the human infant brain

S38.iv:   Zoe Liberman, University of California Santa Barbara

Not all negative emotions are equal: Infants selectively attend to threat

S.38 Q&A:  live questions taking place during Conference Proceedings 1 (BST) only

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