Program

We’re pleased to announce the ICIS 2020 program. Click on the tabs below to review the program by day. Expand/close the text boxes to view the session descriptions.

(Please note, program may be subject to change)

09:00 – 16:00

Micro ERP Boot Camp

Led by Steve Luck, Center for Mind and Brain, UC-Davis

The Micro ERP Boot Camp is a 1-day version of the 10-day UC-Davis ERP Boot Camp.  This workshop provides an intensive introduction to the ERP technique, designed for infancy researchers at the graduate, postgraduate, and faculty levels. It will be designed for individuals who have recently started using ERPs, are thinking about starting a line of ERP research, or just want to be able to understand and critically evaluate published ERP research. No prior ERP background is necessary (but it will also be valuable for people with prior ERP experience).

Topics will include:

  • Experimental design and interpretation
  • Filtering and time-frequency analysis
  • Artifact rejection and correction
  • Averaging and baseline correction
  • Quantifying component amplitudes and latencies
  • Statistical analysis of ERP data

Individuals with no prior ERP background are encouraged to prepare for the workshop by reading the first two chapters of An Introduction to the Event-Related Potential Technique, 2nd Edition (MIT Press).

 

Pre-Congress Workshops

More information coming soon…

 


17:00 – 18:00

Presidential Address: Lisa Oakes, ICIS President

More information coming soon…

 


18:30 – 20:00

Presidential Reception: Glasgow Science Centre

ICIS have exclusive access to Glasgow Science Centre for the reception. It’s a great chance for delegates to connect with friends and colleagues, and explore the centre.

Bring the family to Glasgow and come along to this wonderful venue on opening night! See science and technology presented in unique and inspiring ways – for all ages.

Glasgow Science Centre Photograph by Martin Shields Tel 07572 457000 www.martinshields.com © Martin Shields

08:30 – 09:30

Keynote Speaker: Joseph Call

Joseph Call, University of St Andrews

Topic: Comparative Cognition

Click here for more information on Joseph Call…

 


09:30 – 09:45

Transition break


09:45 – 11:15

DARPA Symposium: Machine Common Sense: Using Infant Psychology to Build Better AI

Organiser: Victoria Romero, Next Century

Modern Artificial Intelligence is capable of impressive feats of learning, such as face recognition, voice to text transcription, and predictive customer support. However, it remains remarkably free of common sense. Although AI programs can provide simple factual information quickly, they are notoriously bad at the types of simple comprehension that humans find effortless. Asking Google “Who was president when Lincoln was born?” yields a lot of information about Lincoln, but none at all about James Madison (who was president when Lincoln was born). Asking a machine if an elephant can fit through a doorway results in a lot of jokes, but no information that would help a robot decide if it might reasonably attempt such a deed. To date, even advanced machine learning algorithms provide only narrow, very specialized “intelligence,” and their path to this content is often obscured in a black box.  Common sense—the things that almost all people understand about how the world works—has never been successfully instilled in a machine. This is partly because common sense relies on background knowledge that human beings accumulate as we develop from conception into adulthood. This is knowledge that includes intuitions such as how the physical world works, how people are motivated, and how agents and objects interact. Therefore, in attempting to build more human-like AI systems, we might do well to heed Alan Turing, who asked, “Instead of trying to produce a programme to simulate the adult mind, why not rather try to produce one which simulates the child’s?” A truly developmental approach to AI could yield breakthroughs that might be impossible with any other approach.

In the interest of advancing the science of Machine Common Sense (MCS), the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has funded a large-scale project that will allow close collaboration between developmental psychologists and AI engineers. This project involves three teams that will be working in the coming years to develop machine agents capable of responding in controlled circumstances as infants of various ages would normally respond in those circumstances. These teams represent a variety of theoretical viewpoints on how development and cognition proceeds in infancy. They consist of scientists from Harvard, MIT, IBM, and Stanford (Cora), Berkeley, Carnegie Mellon, and the University of Michigan (MESS), and Oregon State, New York University, and the University of Utah (OPICS). An additional team has been assigned the task of designing the virtual contexts and tasks in which the machine agents will be evaluated; this team, called PIAGET (Psychometric Intelligent Agent Graphical Environment and Testbed), consists of scientists from Next Century Corporation, Barnard College, New York University, the University of California at Davis, and Pitzer College/Claremont Graduate University. Today’s roundtable will feature representatives from DARPA as well as from each of the four teams working on this project. Short presentations by the panelists will be followed by a question-and-answer session. This symposium will keep infancy researchers abreast of the new MCS project, and afford the teams the opportunity to hear a variety of viewpoints at this nascent stage of the program.

Speakers:

DARPA: Matt Turek

Cora AI Team: Elizabeth Spelke (Harvard University) & Joshua Tenenbaum (MIT)

MESS AI Team: Alison Gopnik & Celeste Kidd (University of California- Berkeley)

OPICS AI Team: Karen Adolph (NYU)

PIAGET Evaluation Team: David Moore (Pitzer College/ Claremont Graduate University), Koleen McCrink (Barnard College, Columbia University), and Victoria Romero (Next Century)

 

Parallel Symposium Sessions

More information coming soon…

 


11:15 – 11:45

Coffee Break


11:45 – 13:15

Invited Session: Nivedita Mani

Click here for more information on Nivedita Mani…

 

Parallel Symposium Sessions

More information coming soon…

 


13:15 – 14:30

Lunch Break (on own)

There are conveniently located cafes and restaurants onsite at the SEC. If you want to stretch your legs, the SEC is a 5 minute walk from Argyle Street in the Finnieston area, considered a ‘culinary hub‘ in Glasgow.

Click here for map

 


14:30 – 16:00

Invited Session: Maria de Hevia

Please click here for more information on Maria de Hevia…

 

Parallel Symposium Sessions

More information coming soon…

 


16:00 – 18:00

Posters and Exhibitors

08:30 – 09:30

Presidential Symposium

Sarah Lloyd Fox, University of Cambridge

Topic: Global Health – Gambia project

Seth Pollak, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Topic: Global Health – low SES in USA

Kim Noble, Columbia University

Topic: Global Health – SES disparities USA

Michael Thomas, Birkbeck, University of London

Topic: Global Health – genetics

Click here for more information on the Presidential Symposium speakers

 


09:30 – 09:45

Transition break


09:45 – 11:15

Invited Session for early stage researchers and students: Diane Poulin Dubois

Diane Poulin Dubois, Concordia University

Working title: Top tips I have learned during my career

Click here for more information on Diane Poulin Dubois…

 

Parallel Symposium Sessions

More information coming soon…

 


11:15 – 11:45

Coffee Break


11:45 – 13:15

Views by 2: Group 1 - Bayesian models vs. Process models

Denis Mareschal, Birkbeck, University of London

Michael Frank, Department of Psychology, Stanford University

Click here for more information on the Views by 2 speakers

 

Views by 2: Group 2 - Infant Social Cognition

Emese Nagy, University of Dundee

Victoria Southgate, University of Copenhagen

Click here for more information on the Views by 2 speakers

 

Views by 2: Group 3 - Language

Larissa Samuelson, University of East Anglia

Judit Gervain, CNRS Paris, France

Click here for more information on the Views by 2 speakers

 


13:15 – 14:30

Lunch Break (on own)

There are conveniently located cafes and restaurants onsite at the SEC. If you want to stretch your legs, the SEC is a 5 minute walk from Argyle Street in the Finnieston area, considered a ‘culinary hub‘ in Glasgow.

Click here for map

 


14:30 – 16:00

Invited Session: Dima Amso

Please click here for more information on Dima Amso…

 

Student led symposium

Organised by the ICIS 2020 Student Committee

More information coming soon…

 

Parallel Symposium Sessions

More information coming soon…

 


16:00 – 18:00

Posters and Exhibitors

08:30 – 09:30

Keynote Speaker: Clare Elwell

Clare Elwell, University College London

Topic: Neuroscience/Methods/Global Health

Click here for more information on Clare Elwell…

 


09:30 – 10:00

Awards / Business Meeting


10:00 – 12:00

Posters and Exhibitors


12:00 – 13:15

Lunch Break (on own)

There are conveniently located cafes and restaurants onsite at the SEC. If you want to stretch your legs, the SEC is a 5 minute walk from Argyle Street in the Finnieston area, considered a ‘culinary hub‘ in Glasgow.

Click here for map

 


13:15 – 14:45

Invited session: Vanessa Lobue

Click here for more information on Vanessa Lobue…

 

Parallel Symposium Sessions

More information coming soon…

 


14:45 – 15:00

Transition break


15:00 – 16:30

Parallel Symposium Sessions

More information coming soon…

 


16:30 – 16:45

Transition break


16:45 – 18:15

Parallel Symposium Sessions

More information coming soon…